Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand?

This is a discussion on Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Almost every lethal defense class I've been to has at least touched on being able/ready to render medical aide to yourself or a comrade in ...

View Poll Results: Supplies and Skills

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  • I do not have any gunshot wound/trauma (GSW) supplies or the skills to use them.

    30 34.88%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) but no knowledge of their use.

    1 1.16%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) and basic knowledge on their use but no advanced training.

    29 33.72%
  • I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) and professional training in their use.

    11 12.79%
  • I have above and beyond the basic trauma supplies (please elaborate) and no professional training in their use.

    0 0%
  • I have above and beyond the basic trauma supplies (please elaborate) and professional training in their use.

    3 3.49%
  • I have all of the supplies, the training to use them and have used them in a occupational or volunteer basis.

    12 13.95%
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Thread: Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand?

  1. #1
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    Array limatunes's Avatar
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    Question Supplies to Treat Gunshot Wounds On Hand?

    Almost every lethal defense class I've been to has at least touched on being able/ready to render medical aide to yourself or a comrade in the event of a violent attack or accident in the home or on the range.

    Because one must not only wait for EMS to arrive on scene but also wait for the scene to be secured before EMS can go in, even if they are on top of their game and can respond in less than five minutes, for someone who is bleeding to death it may not be enough time if you don't have the skills/supplies to at least control the wound until help arrives.

    Tourniquet, pressure bandages, QuikClot and the knowledge to use them, I think, are a good bare minimum for anyone with a gun in their home or on their person.

    Now, I will admit that I have never been to a combat medicine course. It's on my list. I am also hoping to go for my EMT certification this spring after Baby B is born. I have, however, seen these items and more in action, demonstrated and am certain that I could use them effectively in the moment of need. I also have enough understanding where I could use other improvised items like tampons, sanitary napkins, plastic bags, belts, etc, if need be.

    I'm curious to see how many people here have the tools (in their home, range bag, car or on body) and the knowledge to use them if need be.

    If you do have the equipment, what do you have (what brand/type of tourniquet, clotting agent, bandages, etc)? How much of it do you have (2 of x, 3 or y, etc)? And where do you keep it (home, car, range bag) or how do you carry it (bag, pocket)?

    Have you been to any combat medicine or trauma classes? What is your experience with using those tools?

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    I don't have a "Kit" per say, but have a good first aid kit in all the vehicles, and enough experience (some old training in first aid) with initial treatment of superficial to moderate injuries (work related). Identify, inspect, clean, stabilize, control blood loss - not necessarily in that order.

    Improvisation with what is available, and most commonly used is athletic tape and clean paper shop towels for those injuries that do not require immediate medical attention (band-aids don't stay on, save the sterile gauze pads for the bad ones).

    Gunshots...never encountered one, hope I never have to. I'll let you know how I deal with it if it does happen. I'd like to think that I will remain calm enough to address/control the situation until the professionals arrive, or get somewhere for the professionals to do their job.
    Last edited by Sticks; October 24th, 2011 at 06:08 AM. Reason: restatement
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  4. #3
    New Member Array rwehnau's Avatar
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    Adventure Medical Kits Trauma Pack with Quick ClotSponge

    I have an Adventure Medical Kits Trauma Pack with Quick ClotSponge that I carry with me here in the big sandbox for those "just in case" events and have one in every car at home as a quick grab item.

  5. #4
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    I carry my entire military trauma kit where ever I go. I have everything I need to sustain multiple trauma patients until paramedics arrive.
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  6. #5
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    Like Sticks I don't have a GSW Kit, but carry a good first aid kit in both vehicles. At home I have most everything that would be in the FAK available. As for training, basic first aid as well as electrical shock training. In an emergency most anything can be used to slow the flow of blood.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member Array bklynboy's Avatar
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    I keep kits in the car and at home with Israeli trauma bandages, abdominal bandages, chest seals, Kerlix, Celox gauze, tourniquets, Nasopharyngeal Airway Kits, gloves, etc. I have basic first aid skills and CPR certification

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    I answered "I have at least basic GSW supplies (tourniquet, clotting agent) and basic knowledge on their use but no advanced training."

    I have a kit that I keep on my range bag that has both a tourniquet (Israeli bandage) and Quickclot bandages (not the granules). It's red with a big + on it so it's obvious to anyone what it is. Two snaps and it can easily be removed and taken where needed without having to grab the whole range bag. I also have a small kit in my gear bag that stays in my car or goes with me while I'm working.

    In the past I have held Red Cross first aid and CPR certifications and were educated in the use of said supplies but never specifically for a gunshot wound.
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  9. #8
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwehnau View Post
    I have an Adventure Medical Kits Trauma Pack with Quick ClotSponge that I carry with me here in the big sandbox for those "just in case" events and have one in every car at home as a quick grab item.
    I have the same for my range bag, as well as a bag of Israeli bandages, a TQ, quick clot and a host of other stuff.

    SIG Saur's 1st aid for range officers was a good class. 1 day, 8 hours. A nice basic class for non-le/mil people who may encounter GSWs or other trauma.

    Combat first aid...no.

    But for accidents and post use of force incidents, it will do better than not having the class.

  10. #9
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    This is something everyone,even if your just a weekend plinker,needs to have and have training in,a simple blow-out kit can save a life with the proper training,and can be had for about the cost of a couple boxes of ammo,an Israeli bandage, tourniquet,(blood clotting agent,I don't recommend if it is the loose granuels,it is a clotting agent,what happens if it enters a vessel or arterie,it clots,and leaves 1&2 degree burns),the red cross offers the classes,and a lot of your National Gaurd medics offer some sort of a class.

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    Duct tape, a belt, a knife, and a smart phone.

    Before the advent of cellular phones, I also carried bailing wire...

    Basic first aid training.

    Stopped my own bleeding out (literally) at the scene of a motorcycle accident (mine), until ambulance arrived (also prior to cel phones).

    I'll probably be okay.
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    It could be worse.
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  12. #11
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockrocker View Post
    This is something everyone,even if your just a weekend plinker,needs to have and have training in,a simple blow-out kit can save a life with the proper training,and can be had for about the cost of a couple boxes of ammo,an Israeli bandage, tourniquet,(blood clotting agent,I don't recommend if it is the loose granuels,it is a clotting agent,what happens if it enters a vessel or arterie,it clots,and leaves 1&2 degree burns),the red cross offers the classes,and a lot of your National Gaurd medics offer some sort of a class.
    Weekend plinkers, especially those plinking alone, need to have a kit with them.

    Screw up with guns, you can die. It's not a trivial danger.

    You can mitigate danger by good safety practices; however, they exist and they are substantial.

    Think of it as 30 seconds more of life, and a little bit more blood volume in you when the EMS arrives. Will it make the difference? Who know, but it would suck to not have the chance to find out.

  13. #12
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    I have a basic first aid kit with a Quickclot and Israli bandage in each car, home and range bag. I have basic instruction in how to use it, but would like to get more training - TDI anyone?
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  14. #13
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    Man, oh, man! This never crossed my mind! I am a newbie and only thought about which gun, which holster, which ammo, etc., etc. I have a first aid basic kit at home but that's it. The range has kits stored at each section but I don't have a clue what's in them. Bad girl. I think I better find out and get equipped. Don't have a clue as to what the items so far discussed are or where to get them but "bing" works for me. Yikes!! Oh, and thank you for this thread!!!!!!
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  15. #14
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    I have several different level and types of first aid kits for at home, in my vehicles, my BOB and my EDC kits.

    Within those first aid/medical kits I have specific GSW Blow Out kits which keeps specific components for treating life threatening hemorrhage and respiratory compromise isolated for quick and organized access without having to dig deep into the various medical kits.

    I have a GSW Blow Out kit in my range bag, my BOB, my EDC bag (which goes to work and everywhere else I go), and in my home emergency medical kit.

    Inside each my GSW kits I keep, a 6" emergency trauma dressing from North American Rescue; a tourniquet (either a CAT or SOFFT); 10 ga 3.5" IV catheter (for treatment of tension pneumothorax); Asherman Chest Seal or Bolin Chest Seal (for sucking chest wound); 5" X 9" ABD dressing; and either Celox or Quik Clot hemostatic agent.

    I have had professional training in all of that and have done 5 surgical cricothyrodomies and 7 chest decompressions on live patients in my career.
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  16. #15
    Member Array Lanner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwehnau View Post
    I have an Adventure Medical Kits Trauma Pack with Quick ClotSponge that I carry with me here in the big sandbox for those "just in case" events and have one in every car at home as a quick grab item.
    I have this plus a generic first aid kit plus I used to be a wilderness EMT.

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