Surviving a traffic stop

Surviving a traffic stop

This is a discussion on Surviving a traffic stop within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I started a blog about 3 weeks ago that focuses on the 1st 72 hours after an incident and not TEOTWAWKI situations. It is also ...

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Thread: Surviving a traffic stop

  1. #1
    Member Array NC Buckeye's Avatar
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    Surviving a traffic stop

    I started a blog about 3 weeks ago that focuses on the 1st 72 hours after an incident and not TEOTWAWKI situations. It is also not strictly firearms, although that has been the beginning to build traffic.

    Today's post is about surviving the a traffic stop as an armed citizen and looks at the stop from both sides. I took the position that your job during the stop is to not get shot, but I know a number of people don't believe a cop has the right to disarm you. It should be a good topic for debate and discussion and I would appreciate any comments or viewpoints I may have not fully considered.

    Let me know what you think...

    When the Balloon Goes Up!: Surviving a Traffic Stop
    DamYankee likes this.


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    Informative, accurate well-written piece. The initial "must inform" speech can vary a bit, since in Ohio it must include the declaration of being currently armed, but very nicely done. Thanks

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    Member Array maat's Avatar
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    Good information. I had originally not considered turning off my vehicle and had considered retrieving my wallet before the officer approached my vehicle. I thought this might eliminate the getting my wallet near my gun problem. Turning on the indoor lights is also a good idea. Thanks for sharing.

    P.S. I consider seatbelt laws, for adults, an infringement on freedom.

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    Member Array NC Buckeye's Avatar
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    Maat, I clearly think they are BS too!

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    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    FWIW, I have never had an issue retrieving my wallet before the stop or license check. And I believe that it makes the stop go smoother. Once it is retrieved I generally have it in my hand at 12 on the steering wheel. Lets them know what I was doing.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

    "Our houses are protected by the good Lord and a gun. And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son." Josh Thompson "Way Out Here"

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    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefjason View Post
    FWIW, I have never had an issue retrieving my wallet before the stop or license check. And I believe that it makes the stop go smoother. Once it is retrieved I generally have it in my hand at 12 on the steering wheel. Lets them know what I was doing.
    ^^^^^TRUE, Ive always had wallet out & licence in hand with reg&Ins card on viser ; )PS Never a problem
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    A Native Floridian = RARE


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    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Hey NC and maat: I agree on your comments on seat belts AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT EXPECT ANYONE BUT YOURSELVES TO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY AND ALL BILLS RELATING TO INJURIES YOU MAY HAVE RECEIVED BASED ON NOT WEARING YOUR SEATBELTS and that includes your insurance company. You want to talk the talk and talk about your "rights"--guess what responsibities come along with those rights--it is up to you alone to now the walk the walk for your injuries, particularly if they came as you went thru the windshield. You play, you pay. If you can agree it is your right and it is also your responsibility, then we are in total agreement. Problem is too many want their cake and want to eat it too.

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    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
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    It may be just semantics but NC does not require you to notify that you have a permit, they require you to notify when you have a permit AND you are carrying a concealed handgun. If you are not armed there is no requirement to notify that you have a permit. Some people have misunderstood this point in the past.

    In NC not all agencies have the same information system and as a result, some may know the registered owner is a CHP holder but on some it's not on the first page of info they get. As others have mentioned just because the registered owner has a CHP doesn't mean they are driving the vehicle. LEs know that it could be family members, friends, or co-workers, etc. behind the wheel so don't assume they know you have a permit.

    If you have the red book from your CHP class it has a good step by step that you've covered pretty well. They do mention to roll the window halfway down so that you can communicate well with the officer but any aggressive movements on your part would be hindered by the window.

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    VIP Member Array 9MMare's Avatar
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    I dont know, I think ya'll make a bigger deal out of this than necessary. How often do you get pulled over? Do you act weird if you are carrying? Put your hands on the steering wheel and 2 and 10 oclock and proceed as your state laws proscribe.

    What cop is going to freak out just because you are a legal permit carrier with your firearm? It's not uncommon. If they do, you continue to obey them and the law and deal with them in court later.

    I think ya'll just want to feel like you are part of some secret club or something. Or you assume so much disapproval in society that you are looking for reasons to self-righteously assert your rights. I'm kinda amazed....here in liberal W. WA state, way more people have guns, and carry, than I would have thought.

    I've been pulled over 4 times (none for speeding), only 1 ticket written...expired registration...and not one even asked if I had my gun. And all would have known I had a permit when they ran my plates. They didnt ask, didnt act any different. Non-issue.
    Fortune favors the bold.

    Freedom doesn't mean safe, it means free.

    The thing about "defense" is that it has practically nothing to do with guns. (As passed on by CCW9MM)

  10. #10
    Member Array Ishmael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    Hey NC and maat: I agree on your comments on seat belts AS LONG AS YOU DO NOT EXPECT ANYONE BUT YOURSELVES TO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY AND ALL BILLS RELATING TO INJURIES YOU MAY HAVE RECEIVED BASED ON NOT WEARING YOUR SEATBELTS and that includes your insurance company. You want to talk the talk and talk about your "rights"--guess what responsibities come along with those rights--it is up to you alone to now the walk the walk for your injuries, particularly if they came as you went thru the windshield. You play, you pay. If you can agree it is your right and it is also your responsibility, then we are in total agreement. Problem is too many want their cake and want to eat it too.
    Also, while your car is spinning out, a seat belt keeps you in the driver's seat, better able to get the car back under control/avoid further impacts by accelerating or braking/etc. In other words, the seatbelt helps you not hit me, so I don't think this is entirely a "personal freedom" situation.

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    VIP Member Array Majorlk's Avatar
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    I find all the traffic stop threads interesting. Until I retired four years ago, I was driving 30,000+ miles a year. Since the early 60s I have driven well over a million and a half miles. Other than a dozen or so DL and sobriety checks over the years, I have been stopped exactly TWICE - once on my honeymoon for doing 10mph over the limit (turned out the speedometer was bad and the ticket was later dismissed) and once in the late 70s for an improper lane change (to avoid hitting an animal).

    It is my considered opinion that if people would actually obeyed the posted speed limit instead of driving like you THINK it should be, the need for interaction with a LEO would be pretty much non-existant. I feel no sympathy for the person who gets nailed for speeding.
    An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life. - Robert A. Heinlein

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    Quote Originally Posted by 9MMare View Post
    I dont know, I think ya'll make a bigger deal out of this than necessary. How often do you get pulled over? Do you act weird if you are carrying? Put your hands on the steering wheel and 2 and 10 oclock and proceed as your state laws proscribe.

    What cop is going to freak out just because you are a legal permit carrier with your firearm? It's not uncommon. If they do, you continue to obey them and the law and deal with them in court later.

    I think ya'll just want to feel like you are part of some secret club or something. Or you assume so much disapproval in society that you are looking for reasons to self-righteously assert your rights. I'm kinda amazed....here in liberal W. WA state, way more people have guns, and carry, than I would have thought.

    I've been pulled over 4 times (none for speeding), only 1 ticket written...expired registration...and not one even asked if I had my gun. And all would have known I had a permit when they ran my plates. They didnt ask, didnt act any different. Non-issue.
    The letter of the law we are discussing are for "must inform" states. It is a very big deal in Ohio, for example if one does not "promptly inform" and/or then subsequently behave in a very exact, prescribed manner. Do it wrong and go to jail, pay the fine and lose the permit. Just how it is.

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    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Majorlk View Post
    I find all the traffic stop threads interesting. Until I retired four years ago, I was driving 30,000+ miles a year. Since the early 60s I have driven well over a million and a half miles. Other than a dozen or so DL and sobriety checks over the years, I have been stopped exactly TWICE - once on my honeymoon for doing 10mph over the limit (turned out the speedometer was bad and the ticket was later dismissed) and once in the late 70s for an improper lane change (to avoid hitting an animal).

    It is my considered opinion that if people would actually obeyed the posted speed limit instead of driving like you THINK it should be, the need for interaction with a LEO would be pretty much non-existant. I feel no sympathy for the person who gets nailed for speeding.
    FWIW, I have had one interaction with LE for speeding in the last 18 years and one accident where I was not at fault. There were a few in high school, guess I learned a lesson. But NC, and this area in particular, has a fascination with DL and DUI checkpoints. I've probably been through a dozen in the last few years, I work late hours though. Not to mention my wonderful encounters with DOT while driving a tractor trailer. So I've got my system pretty down pat at this point.

    For the most part you can lesson your encounters by playing by the rules. But not completely around here.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

    "Our houses are protected by the good Lord and a gun. And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son." Josh Thompson "Way Out Here"

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    Ex Member Array MP9NewMexico's Avatar
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    Very nice blog. Here in NM, it is legal to carry a concealed weapon in your car and home without a CHL, so I routinely do so.
    At my last traffic stop (speeding + missing tail light + late at night driving home from school), I had a very positive interaction. It went something like this:

    The officer asked "Are there any illegal substances or weapons in this vehicle that I should be aware of?"
    I answered, "Yes sir. I carry a 9mm semi-auto in my glovebox."
    The officer then said, "Ok, please place your left hand on the doorframe, take your right hand and open the glovebox. Then take the weapon, barrel first, and hand it to me, slowly."
    I complied, and he took the pistol back to his car. He then returned for my license, insurance card, and registration. Once he had ran these, he returned them to me. Then he returned my pistol, unload, with the slide racked and locked, and the magazine out. Finally, he said "Make sure to get that light fixed, ok?" and then let me go.

    All in all, a pretty stress-free stop. I think the key, as the OP states, is to be polite, let the officer know you are armed, and move slowly. And comply with their instructions.

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    VIP Member Array 9MMare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    The letter of the law we are discussing are for "must inform" states. It is a very big deal in Ohio, for example if one does not "promptly inform" and/or then subsequently behave in a very exact, prescribed manner. Do it wrong and go to jail, pay the fine and lose the permit. Just how it is.
    Well how hard is it to do all those things? Today, many cops traffic stops are video taped and almost all are audio taped (except in more out of the way places). If an officer reacts improperly, go thru the chain of command and see it made right. But I find the whole 'surviving traffic stops' thing and 'dont get shot when stopped' thing a bit dramatic.

    Many people carry, cops should be trained to deal with it. Is it really that 'wild West' in Ohio with car stops? You have my sympathies if it is.

    But no matter what the laws, I dont know why cops in different states would freak out more or less over people carrying, no matter if they must inform or not.
    Fortune favors the bold.

    Freedom doesn't mean safe, it means free.

    The thing about "defense" is that it has practically nothing to do with guns. (As passed on by CCW9MM)

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