glock 19 not chambered or Ruger SR9C safety on

This is a discussion on glock 19 not chambered or Ruger SR9C safety on within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hello, I am new to the site so I apologize if this has already been beat up. I am new to handgun ownership(45 years old ...

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Thread: glock 19 not chambered or Ruger SR9C safety on

  1. #1
    New Member Array msutt1's Avatar
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    glock 19 not chambered or Ruger SR9C safety on

    Hello,
    I am new to the site so I apologize if this has already been beat up. I am new to handgun ownership(45 years old and up till a month ago had never fired a handgun). I have applied for my concealed carry and am currently deciding on my carry. I read Somebody who said the only valuable carry gun is the one you are willing to carry. I am not comfortable carrying my Glock 19 chambered and ready to fire. I am also not comfortable carrying my Ruger SR9C without the safety on, so I would love to hear people's opinions or thoughts on which way I would be best off.
    Thanks

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  3. #2
    Member Array RTTR84's Avatar
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    I just need to ask why are you not comfortable with a Glock?

    A bad holster is a bad holster regardless of how many "safeties" something has. Get a good holster for the Glock that has a solid full covering of the trigger, and you shouldn't have anything to worry about.
    Guest1, Mike1956, rdpG19 and 3 others like this.

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    Member Array Aaron1100us's Avatar
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    I carry my glocks loaded and ready to go, otherwise I might as well cary a brick. Good holster and keep your finger out of the trigger until ready to fire.

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk

  5. #4
    Member Array RTTR84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron1100us View Post
    I carry my glocks loaded and ready to go, otherwise I might as well cary a brick. Good holster and keep your finger out of the trigger until ready to fire.

    Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk
    Maybe someone can also prove me wrong, but I have NEVER heard of a Glock just going off unless the trigger is being pulled, this is why I fully trust the design of them. I've dropped my G26 on a tile floor, the split second in-between impact I was thinking to myself OH crap, but remembered quickly of it's internal design.
    Last edited by SIXTO; November 17th, 2011 at 10:18 AM.

  6. #5
    New Member Array msutt1's Avatar
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    I have a comp-tac MTAC holster for the Glock 19. I would probably order the same holster for my Ruger if I chose that route.

    My feeling of being uncomfortable probably just comes from my lack of experience with handguns. Maybe in time it will go away, but for now I am just not comfortable carrying it that way.

  7. #6
    Ex Member Array Snatale42's Avatar
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    It's preference but I'll tell you this, Glocks are designed to be carried (as all guns are) loaded and ready to go. You need to do some research on Glock's Safe Action system. There are 3 passive safeties in place on Glock pistols, If you don't pull the trigger and it's in an appropriate holster it ain't going bang! I'm not a fan of manual safeties, but everyone is different. If you buy a gun with one, use it. BUT I'd still recommend the Glock or an M&P. If your worried about your gun going off, you need more training. Hands on training with a Glock or other passive safety gun will make you more confident. Make sure you don't cheap out with the holster! You WILL regret it of you do!
    Mike1956, joker1, Bark'n and 1 others like this.

  8. #7
    Member Array Ford's Avatar
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    Why not carry the SR9c chambered with the safety on then?

    Many feel uncomfortable carrying chambered at first. However, an unchambered gun puts you at a severe disadvantage if you were to ever need it, which is the whole point of carrying in the first place. When I started carrying my 1911, I carried for one day with an empty chamber, cocked hammer, safety off. Of course it was in a good holster, and the hammer didn't fall because no one pulled the trigger. After that little test, I carry cocked and locked and have no issue with it.

  9. #8
    Member Array WonderBra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msutt1 View Post
    I have a comp-tac MTAC holster for the Glock 19. I would probably order the same holster for my Ruger if I chose that route.

    My feeling of being uncomfortable probably just comes from my lack of experience with handguns. Maybe in time it will go away, but for now I am just not comfortable carrying it that way.
    Your own assessment of the situation is accurate. Overtime, as you get more comfortable with the handgun you will know what it should and should not do. In the meantime, just to ease your comfort level, try carrying with a snap cap or unloaded gun with no magazine and try different scenarios. You will find that unless you somehow pull the trigger, the Glock will not "fire."

    I did the same to overcome my locked & cocked 1911. I KNOW that it should not fire without both the manual safety and the grip safety on. I've tested this in many scenarios with a snap cap or unloaded gun.

    Since it has only been about a month ago that you fired your first handgun, these concerns are natural, but over time, as you follow safe habits and keep the loaded gun in a good holster, the fears will go away.

    Welcome to DC and please keep asking questions.
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    Member Array Marc1103's Avatar
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    I have a Gen 4 Glock 23 with a DeSantis IWB holster. Always carry it chambered and like everyone else said a good holster makes a huge difference. If you're not going to chamber it all you really have is an eexpensive paper weight. Those few seconds it takes to chamber a round could make a huge difference down the line.

  11. #10
    Member Array RTTR84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc1103 View Post
    I have a Gen 4 Glock 23 with a DeSantis IWB holster. Always carry it chambered and like everyone else said a good holster makes a huge difference. If you're not going to chamber it all you really have is an eexpensive paper weight. Those few seconds it takes to chamber a round could make a huge difference down the line.
    It's not just the few seconds, it's the fact under stress statistics have proven half racking (failure to properly chamber) is the biggest concern.
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    Senior Member Array WC145's Avatar
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    You're far better off with the SR9 chambered/safety on than an empty Glock, it's no different than the 1911 I carry cocked and locked every day. Just be sure that you are well versed in the operation of the gun so that you're not having to fumble for the safety during your moment of need.
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    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    I suggest you draw both empty numerous times until you are sick of it. Move all ammunition and mags to another room. Rack both slides Have the Glock trigger staged to be pulled. Dry firing will not hurt either gun. Draw the Ruger, disengage the safety and pull the trigger. Do this multiple times. If you have a friend with a stop watch it would help, to see which of the two are faster. Then do the same with the Glock. Train your brain to draw with the index finger parallel to the trigger guard and not in the trigger guard the practice will help with both guns and maybe make you less afraid of the Glock.

    My personal chiocewould be to carry the Glock loaded. It is a better choice IMO. More motion and movement takes more time, whether it is disengaging a safety or racking a slide. In a critical incident where you are being attacked your fine motor skills are diminished. A gun where you can draw and fire without hinderance is a better choice.

    What if your attacker is on top of you before you know at bad breath distance? Do you think you can draw and rack or draw and disengage a small thumb safety?

    You should seek out some professional training as well to help you get better at your draws and overall shooitng ability if you are still that wary about a handgun.

    Living in Ohio you should possibly contact TDI. They are highly recommended on this board.

    Tactical Defense Institute -- Ohio Firearms - Gun - Rifle - Shotgun - Pistol - CCW - Concealed Carry Permit -- TDI --www.tdiohio.com -- Cincinnati - Dayton - Columbus - Cleveland - Lexington - Louisville - Wheeling - Huntington - Indianapolis
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    Quote Originally Posted by msutt1 View Post
    Hello,
    I am new to the site so I apologize if this has already been beat up. I am new to handgun ownership(45 years old and up till a month ago had never fired a handgun). I have applied for my concealed carry and am currently deciding on my carry. I read Somebody who said the only valuable carry gun is the one you are willing to carry. I am not comfortable carrying my Glock 19 chambered and ready to fire. I am also not comfortable carrying my Ruger SR9C without the safety on, so I would love to hear people's opinions or thoughts on which way I would be best off.
    Thanks
    First and foremost, welcome to the forum.

    I'd strongly implore you to seek out some additional defensive pistol training. Thinking oneself armed because one has a gun is like thinking oneself a musician because one owns a piano.

    Both of those things said, carrying any pistol without a round in the chamber implies the assumption that if you need the gun to defend yourself, you will have time and ability to chamber a round. That is not a safe assumption. It may well be a fatal error. One of your hands might be injured in the initial attack. You might need a hand to move a loved one or bystander out of the way. You might need a hand to keep the attacker off of you so that you can draw. Any number of things could easily prevent you from having both hands free to chamber a round.

    I would suggest carrying the Glock in a quality holster, completely unloaded, with the striker cocked (i.e. clear the gun completely, cycle the slide and holster with the trigger in the forward position) around the house for a few days. You will notice that the trigger remains in the forward position, indicating that the pistol has not "fired" of it's own accord.

    Chambered versus not chambered is a frequent topic here. Through all the iterations, it remains true that not one single reputable instructor recommends carrying with an empty chamber. In fact, the vast majority of people who advocate carrying unchambered have never taken a defensive pistol course beyond the bare minimum to obtain a CCW permit.

    Matt
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  15. #14
    Member Array tomtsr's Avatar
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    msutt1,

    Welcome to the forum. You have been given some good advice in the previous posts. Firearms comfort come in many stages, or at least it should.

    Many of us here have been handling guns since we little, and some are later in life. Most will take some time getting used to the feel of the gun, the action of the gun, how much recoil is felt, supporting equipment and such. I am an old fart and there weren't many choices in auto-loaders when I came to handguns. The 1911 was king and if you do a search you will find the debate has been going on about cocked and locked for many decades. It took me awhile to warm up to "plastic" guns and Glock in particular. Old mindsets are hard to break. I still have a couple of 1911's hanging around but I carry a Glock primarily now, always with one in the chamber.

    You are going through the early stages of carrying a gun, mindset. As has been listed above, training will greatly enhance your comfort with loaded chamber or safety on type carry. There are some prominent schools that teach a "Heavy" defensive pistol, meaning a 1911 style, and some that believe that every gun should be a Glock, every Glock should be 9mm, and every 9mm should be a model 19. It's their mindset.

    I do not recommend rotating your carry guns as this introduces a different mechanical action to get the gun into battery ready to fire. If you do, I cannot stress enough the need for training and extensive practice with both.

    You will go through a few more stages soon. When you start carrying in public you are going to think "everybody can see my gun." This is normal and usually unfounded. However, you will probably touch it several times and check it's status. This will pass as you get familiar and comfortable carrying.

    My, and several others, suggestion is to get some training locally to you and then branch out to one of the great schools in your region.

    Again, welcome to the forum, and welcome to carrying. Come back often.
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    VIP Member Array joker1's Avatar
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    Ruger chambered with safety on would be quicker to fire than having to use 2 hands to chamber a round in a GLOCK or any other pistol for that matter.

    I EDC a GLOCK 19 in a CBST (Crossbreed Supertuck) holster daily. 15 in the magazine and 1 in the chamber. I have heard of some semi-auto pistols trigger being caught up in and manipulated by collapsed holsters. The CBST is a flat piece of leather or horsehide attached to a Kydex shell molded to fit the pistol. Even under the pressure of a cinched up sturdy Crossbreed belt all day the Kydex retains it's shape and rigidity (I know it has a pistol in it all day too). What this means is the trigger is covered by leather on the inside and Kydex on the outside. The trigger is protected while holstered. After drawing your pistol the Kydex retains it's shape and is waiting there open for reholstering. Reholstering is one of the last things to care about in a defensive shooting encounter but safe and secure reholstering is essential when it comes to competing, practicing, and if you should ever have to leave your pistol in the car to go into a prohibited building and reholstering when you get back into the car. Basically a good holster and trigger finger discipline are critical. External safeties are ok but they can fail and worse they are real easy to forget when you are under stress. I can't knock the SR pistols but I can say the GLOCK 19 is a damn fine reliable pistol. If it has bullets it goes bang when the trigger is pulled. Draw, point, squeeze trigger. Repeat the last one as necessary. A bang is a more comforting sound than a click when your life is on the line.
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