Cross Draw Concealed Carry

This is a discussion on Cross Draw Concealed Carry within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Any carry method is a matter of personal choice. But over my nearly 35 years of involvement in the law enforcement community Iíve seen very ...

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Thread: Cross Draw Concealed Carry

  1. #1
    Member Array Aduc's Avatar
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    Cross Draw Concealed Carry

    Any carry method is a matter of personal choice. But over my nearly 35 years of involvement in the law enforcement community Iíve seen very little said in favor of the cross draw method of carry. Weíll talk here about the belted carry and leave shoulder holsters for another time

    Frequently, the author or lecturer puts down the cross draw as too dangerous, too easily accessed by an aggressor, taken away from the owner and used against him or her. Granted, retention of oneís own firearm should always be a concern, no matter what method of carry is employed. However, should the cross draw method be forgotten? I think not. In fact, itís become one of my favorite methods of concealed carry.

    Why might someone want to use a cross draw belt holster? It would seem to me to be strictly a matter of personal comfort. Any of us who have worn a gun daily, all day knows they are seldom comfortable. In fact, itís been said, guns arenít supposed to be comfortable, rather, comforting. Strong side hip holsters are the mainstay of the industry, but are they the only method to be considered?

    I use the cross draw mode primarily because of lingering shoulder injuries that restrict my ability to reach high for a grip above my beltline on my strong side. I can still make it, but itís never easy, never fast, and is sometimes downright painful. In addition, I spend a fair amount of time seated in my car. Have you ever tried to draw your gun from a strong side hip holster while seated in your car? No? You should, but please use a training gun. Never practice your draw stroke with a loaded gun. A plastic training gun is always the safest...

    Cross Draw Concealed Carry
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  3. #2
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    Array Paladin3840's Avatar
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    Once upon a time a cross draw at 9:00 holster and a Santa Clause belt ruled the day. Today cross draw at any o'clock it is poo-pooed by the uninitiated.

    There are pros and cons to each mode of carry. You have thought out the cross draw issue carefully, and are not alone in using this method where circumstances render it acceptable. Those who limit themselves to only one method of carry because it is the "in vogue" way limit themselves.

  4. #3
    Member Array wdbailey's Avatar
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    Many years ago when I ordered my very first "custom" holster and belt I spoke by phone with Bruce Nelson. He was the inventor of the appendix IWB and was a big proponent of the cross draw. He expressed the opinion that the strong side draw as the main carry position was the result of the necessities of safety on the line at firearm training schools. He invited me to come train with him but sadly he suffered a stroke and passed away before I could ever get to meet him in person

  5. #4
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    Drawing a firearm from any position can cause problems without practice and confidence.

    Cross-draw?
    When on long trips, my Glock-36 rides in this...http://www.fist-inc.com/holsters/holster/42.htm

    Serves two purposes...
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    Member Array tet4's Avatar
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    The three reasons I always hear as cons are:

    1. It can get taken away from you in a confrontation. Personally, if it's concealed, I don't think it matters, and second, I want to carry a gun in a position that I can monitor. It someone is behind me, I have no idea what they are doing.

    2. It's an unsafe draw that sweeps everyone else. This is just bad training. A safe cross draw is done with the hip pointed forward first so when the muzzle leaves the holster, it is already pointed down range.

    3. If you are pressed up against something (like you are belly down on the ground and someone is on top of you, you can't get to it. That's very true, but it can be said for any carry position.

    Personally, I've found in the short amount of time I've carried and experimented that it's the only position that I can wear a gun while seated for long periods of time.

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array zacii's Avatar
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    I've experimented with cross draw, a little. Due to my shape, I'm unable to conceal it very well.

    But I've discovered that it's cousin, AIWB, works for me
    Trust in God and keep your powder dry

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    Member Array jrclen's Avatar
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    I'm new to CCW but I like the cross draw carry. I am in and out of the truck and it's comfortable for me. Anyone grabbing for it is going to be in front of me where I can see them. I am left handed and I place the IWB holster at about 1 oclock or maybe 1:30. Maybe as I learn more about all this I will change my mind, but for now, this is what I like. In spring I will try it on the Harley and see how that works out.
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    Member Array Eaglebeak's Avatar
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    Cross-draw or conventional is a matter of personal choice and comfort like every other aspect of concealed carry; and both have their strong pros and cons in different situations. Personally, I've got as many cross-draw rigs as I do conventional, and my choice of either one or its particular type is always dependent on how I'm dressed and what I'll be doing most of the time.

    During any physical altercation or ensuing wrestling match after suddenly being unexpectedly pounced by someone, there are no substantial pros or cons for either cross-draw or conventional carry because there are thousands of totally unpredictable positions that one could find themselves in that could either prevent drawing the weapon or having it become available to grab by an attacker during the brawl. Only advice there is to keep the SA working and not allow things to get physical because it's a totally unpredictable crap-shoot after that.

    I always use a cross-draw when I'm going to be wearing a jacket or coat because it's much easier for me to simply slip my hand inside my jacket or coat to cover my weapon without opening my jacket (and without exposing the weapon) for an instant pull if necessary; however, that's not possible with strong-side carry unless I completely "telegraph" my intent (and the fact I'm carrying) by pulling the side of my coat or jacket open and back out of the way like a Hollywood western gunfighter does before the big shootout on main street. However, when not wearing a jacket or coat that's in the way of a quick strong-side draw, I usually opt for strong-side carry since my hand can gently slip back toward my weapon in a potentially dangerous situation a lot less obviously than moving my arm across my body would "telegraph".

    Personally, I would prefer either shoulder-holster or left-side "counter-appendix" belt carry all the time if maintaining concealment wasn't such a major issue simply because I can draw and point-shoot much faster than I can with any type of strong-side carry - especially in a confined area or when someone or something is next to me for my elbow to bump when doing the "chicken wing" maneuver to draw from a strong-side belt holster in any position.

    Try wedging yourself into a corner with your strong side or put your strong side against someone standing next to you and try drawing your weapon quickly and efficiently; can't be done because the "chicken wing" movement of raising and extending your elbow far out to the side and/or rear will jam it into the wall or person next to you. Now, put yourself in the same confined position with either side wedged into a corner and/or with someone standing against you on both sides and notice how easy it is to simply slide your arm across your body to cross-draw and swing the weapon forward on point with little or no interference. But, once again, it's all a matter of personal preference for each individual's particular ability, comfort, and practical application.
    wmhawth and jrclen like this.

  10. #9
    Member Array pappou68's Avatar
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    I had never considered crossdraw b4 but I've read some good points here.

  11. #10
    Member Array elad's Avatar
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    It is the most comfortable way to carry in the car and I find myself carrying cross draw most of the time now.
    "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun" Wayne LaPierre

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array CR Williams's Avatar
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    My consideration of the best way to draw from that position:

    Crossdraw.mp4 video by crw0000 - Photobucket
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    Member Array Ksthumper's Avatar
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    Like the OP, I have limited right shoulder mobility and found it impossible to draw right-handed from a strong side OWB or IWB holster. Therefore, I carry cross draw at 10 o'clock in a OWB thumb snap retention holster or a IWB holster.

    This solves the 'while driving' problem and I wear an un-buttoned cover garment shirt, vest or coat. As stated by Eaglebreak', I can simply slip my hand inside the cover garment without having to open and move it out of the way to draw.

    This becomes natural with practice and when you take a right step back as you draw the the 'sweeping' argument is a non-issue.

  14. #13
    Ex Member Array rgbiker's Avatar
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    I OC cross draw. I find it to be more comfortable while driving and less stressful on store clerks, when I don't have to reach around a gun to get my money from front pocket.

    As always - YMMV.

  15. #14
    Member Array DaveT's Avatar
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    Years ago I hit a deer while riding my Harley. Right leg was so badly broken that the ortho surgeon had to take bone from my right hip and transplant it down into my right leg in order to get bone growing there again. The leg was saved by this surgery and I certainly don't have any complaints.

    The scar on my right hip is exactly where my strong side carry is normally located. As scar tissue has formed over the years, I began to find it painful to carry there for any amount of time. Also, the surgery removed a lot of bone from the right hip and I soon discovered that the weight of a loaded gun would soon cause my holster to start sliding downward on that side, there's just not the natural shape of a hip to hold it up any more.

    I started experimenting with different carry methods and eventually settled on cross draw. With practice, it has become second nature and is actually very comfortable. With either a Sig P238, a Kimber Solo, a Kimber Ultra Carry, or a S&W 642, concealment is not an issue and I have discovered that a straight drop in IWB holster designed for the right side can be very comfortable and practical when worn at the 10:00 position on the left side between the pants and belt. True crossdraw holsters are hard to find, this method works very well and no special holster is needed.

  16. #15
    Senior Member Array FastDraw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    Drawing a firearm from any position can cause problems without practice and confidence.

    Cross-draw?
    When on long trips, my Glock-36 rides in this...FIST, INC.

    Serves two purposes...
    Great idea ret....... We take many "long" car trips each year, including a yearly trip CO-FL each year. On long trips having a holster on my right side just doesn't work for me.

    Be Alert and Stay Safe

    FastDraw

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