Unholstering practice

This is a discussion on Unholstering practice within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Here's an option of practicing the draw that I recently came up with. Everyday when I unholster, I make a point of treating it like ...

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Thread: Unholstering practice

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    Unholstering practice

    Here's an option of practicing the draw that I recently came up with.

    Everyday when I unholster, I make a point of treating it like a draw.

    Basically, I pick a spot that is "safe" to point the firearm. I draw just like I would if it were a real event, with the same concealment issues. Safety disengaged, target acquired, finger off trigger. Then I re-safety and store the weapon.

    I figure as long as I have to pull it out of the holster, I might as well make it as real as possible, no sense in building bad habits, mainly forgeting the safety.

    Anybody think this is a good or bad idea?
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    Member Array LTPhoon's Avatar
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    It might not be the best thing to do as it increases the opportunity for an AD. Maybe unloading the gun, checking, checking one more time and then doing a dozen in front of a mirror would be better....

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    VIP Member Array rodc13's Avatar
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    +1 on unloading the gun when practicing.
    Cheers,
    Rod
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    I carry DA/SA and so do not consider draw practice with that loaded as too risky - bearing in mind full compliance with rule #2.

    I am often walking back yard to or from house to office and will draw while walking - probably looks real funny to anyone if I was seen but - does hone the fluency a little.
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    Ditto the above and do "way more" than one...to include replacing your cover garment exactly as carried for each draw and presentation.

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    VIP Member Array SammyIamToday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post
    I carry DA/SA and so do not consider draw practice with that loaded as too risky - bearing in mind full compliance with rule #2.

    I am often walking back yard to or from house to office and will draw while walking - probably looks real funny to anyone if I was seen but - does hone the fluency a little.
    Same, do it at random times around the house. My old lady probably thinks I'm crazy.

    Also, I think it's plenty safe as your finger is your real safety.
    Last edited by SammyIamToday; August 25th, 2006 at 01:51 PM.

  8. #7
    Member Array Falsemap's Avatar
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    IMO emptying the gun and practicing several in front of the mirror is the way to go, especially in the house.

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    Probably not the best thing to do, let me give you and example of a friend of mine who used to do just that sort of thing.

    He used to practice drawing and firing with an unloaded gun in front of the full length bathroom mirror. One day he was one his way to work, loaded up, and decided he was going to draw a couple of times.

    BANG, he shot the medicine cabinet mirror on the bathroom wall, the rd passed through that wall [ 45 GD ], into his bedroom closet, ripped through several of his wifes silky things hanging up, passed through that closet wall and lodged on the other side of the bedroom in the wall, 3 feet from where his wife had just been standing herself.

    Unloaded gun draws are safe practice. Loaded guns make for mistakes and AD's over time.

    Have I ever practiced drawing with a loaded gun myself? Of course, every day, several times a day, with speed and with the clothes I'm wearing while walking around the back yard or in the house myself, so I'm not preaching don't do it, but know that the possibilities are there for problems one day.

    Like Chris, rule #2 is followed.

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    Member Array Blackhawk6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramedic70002 View Post
    Basically, I pick a spot that is "safe" to point the firearm. I draw just like I would if it were a real event, with the same concealment issues. Safety disengaged, target acquired, finger off trigger. Then I re-safety and store the weapon.

    I figure as long as I have to pull it out of the holster, I might as well make it as real as possible, no sense in building bad habits, mainly forgeting the safety.

    Anybody think this is a good or bad idea?
    I do something similar. I do not subscribe to the notion of having seperate administrative and tactical (for lack of a better word) gunhandling techniques. I strive to have my adminstritative gunhandling duplicate my tactical (there's that word again) gunhandling as much as possible. Consequently, every time I remove my weapon from the holster, I do so using my draw stroke. My loading sequence looks identical to an out of battery reload and my unloading process looks very similar to those used when I perform remedial action to clear a malfunction.

    Where I differ from what it is that you do is that I draw to the ready and I do not disengage the safety. I only disengage the safety as I advance the weapon toward a threat, not upon the gun leaving the holster. As there is no "threat" when I "deholster" the safety stays on and the finger stays straight along the frame.

    I believe there is an enormous amount of value in not conditioning yourself to conclude every draw stroke with a press of the trigger or the disengagement of the safety. Every draw stroke will not be in response to an immediate threat.

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