Bullet set back

This is a discussion on Bullet set back within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Bullet set back. I have always been a revolver person but in the last couple of years I have switched over to semi automatic. And ...

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Thread: Bullet set back

  1. #1
    Member Array Jdp751's Avatar
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    Bullet set back

    Bullet set back. I have always been a revolver person but in the last couple of years I have switched over to semi automatic. And I know not to chamber the same round more than one or two times not to get bullet setback. My question is how will bullet set back affect the performance. What can happen with a setback. I could understand a feeding issue. But what other problems could it present. And how severe wood setback have to be to present a problem

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    Member Array drbald1's Avatar
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    I confess I'm a little under-informed here as well. I know it's a problem, but I'm not sure how much of one or what a good system is to avoid those problems.

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Bullet setback can compress the powder charge increasing the pressure when fired,most severe case can cause your gun to blow up
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

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    In addition to the KABOOM, repeated chambering can loosen the priming mixture and cause an otherwise normal looking cartridge to fail to fire.
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    Member Array drbald1's Avatar
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    So how many setbacks does it take to make KABOOM? One? Three? Thirty?

    In other words, is this low risk/high consequence (getting mauled by a bear in my backyard) or high risk/high consequence (getting hit by MeeMaw in a minivan while riding my Harley)?

    I'm assuming anything titled "KABOOM" is in the high consequence category.

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    Member Array Qtip's Avatar
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    I'm also uninformed in this area, but I was wondering if lowering the slide gently to chamber a round would reduce setback, as opposed to just dropping the slide. Anybody have thoughts on that?
    Last edited by Qtip; March 13th, 2012 at 11:44 AM. Reason: Typo

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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    Just leave the weapon chambered. Why is everyone chambering and un-chambering their rounds?

    Load the weapon. If you must store it, store it with a kydex holster covering the trigger in your safe... loaded.

    The only time you should be unchambering your weapon is to fire at the target or to work on it.

    Train with the ammo you shoot with. I always go through a few mags ( or cylinders) of my self defense rounds to make sure I am proficient with it before I start using range ammo to do extended practice..... then I take it home, clean it, reload it and leave it.

    Leave it loaded! Want to rotate it? Go shoot it.
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    Senior Member Array CowboyColby's Avatar
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    I chamber and unchamber mine quite often due to taking out my defensive rounds to put fmj in for range time. I probably do it weekly at least. I'll rechamber a defenisve round usually five times ( I don't know how many it takes for a set back) then usually shoot that round off just to be safe. Right, wrong, or in different thats what I do.

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    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
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    I just buy a second weapon of the same model to train with. I have three duplicate weapons. That way I keep wear and tear off my carry piece and I don't have to do that. The way I see it, if you can afford to shoot that much then you can afford 5 bills for another weapon.Range gun.

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    Member Array drbald1's Avatar
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    But, since I don't have a duplicate carry weapon right now, I'm working with what I've got. I can afford to shoot enough to feel like I'm being responsible without breaking the bank.

    That's only 200 rounds or so WWB a month...a tad over $40. Letsee...that's 11 months of range time to set aside 5 bills. No, I think I'll rotate, shoot my SD ammo sparingly, and save up scratch for a duplicate range gun. (You're right, azchevy, in that I need to duplicate my EDC).

    Until then....I'm working on a system to avoid KABOOM!

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    Quote Originally Posted by drbald1 View Post
    ...
    Until then....I'm working on a system to avoid KABOOM!
    Just mark the previously chambered round with a sharpie and rotate it to the bottom of your mag. When your top round shows up with a stripe on it, throw them in the range bag. That way you get occasional practice with your actual carry rounds without breaking the bank either.
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    Senior Member Array CowboyColby's Avatar
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    To many firearms I'd still like to purchase before doubling up on them. Its a tool made to be used and abused I'm not going to baby any of them. (Except the old ones from Great Grandpa)

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    It can cause higher pressure to build in casing upon firing & possibly bulge/rupture the firing chamber if bullet doesn't clear the barrel fast enough. Sometimes you can actually see a short bullet as compared to a properly seated one. If you're a reloader, use a bullet puller hammer to remove the thing and recycle the case and bullet. I have just dropped in the case and fired the gun to blow the primer with no powder in it. Too chancy to remove a live one. Anyone using Lee Reloading equipment NOTE: don't load Federal primers if using that hand-loader with a tray. They can explode-Lee has a warning on this. Apparently CCI/Winchester are fine, but Federal has their own super-secret recipe and it's touchy!

    If you cycle it in slowly, must look at gun and physically push back of slide to make sure in battery and not still only partially chambered. You should ideally let the gun cycle the round out of the magazine. Some people I've seen at the local range drop a round into the barrel and drop the slide. It works good with Ruger and such, but wouldn't do it with a custom 1911-A1 model with a custom trigger job.

    I personally rotate mine out as well after a period of time and throw the old one in a ziplock bag for range practice. Ammo left setting in the barrel too long could have the primer go inert from any excess oil, (or get stuck and not cycle out when fired from oil on sides cooking to case in hot environments) especially if it comes in through the firing pin hole and the gun is stored straight up and down-like in a holster.
    Good practice is emptying the magazines about once a week and allowing the springs to keep from getting weak because of the constant compression. When loading them up, I usually smack the back of the mag into the palm of my hand every few rounds, making sure they are nice and seated evenly and correctly in the magazine. Sometimes you may have to remove the baseplate and "stretch" the spring a little if it appears too weak-be sure not to put it back in backwards. On blued magazines there is a compromise of using little oil and somehow trying to prevent them from rusting. One trick I found is to coat them (works well with 1911 mags) with car wax (the kind that is real wax...in a can) lightly. They don't rust and are really fast on reload/dropping free. I keep a touch-up blue pen handy with a #2 lead pencil and a large flat eraser. If you have rust spots and it's a dry mag with no oil, just erase the rust with the eraser, lead it with the pencil, touch-up blue the spot and oil the whole thing. Wipe it down good and wax it a little.

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