Stoopid Confessions: Breeches in Gun Safety

This is a discussion on Stoopid Confessions: Breeches in Gun Safety within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hello All, I figured I'd start this thread after another thread began diverging into this realm. The question is, what are some of the stupidist, ...

Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 102

Thread: Stoopid Confessions: Breeches in Gun Safety

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Joshua M. Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wabash IN
    Posts
    675

    Stoopid Confessions: Breeches in Gun Safety

    Hello All,

    I figured I'd start this thread after another thread began diverging into this realm.

    The question is, what are some of the stupidist, most idiotic experiences you've personally had, or personally witnessed, with firearms? I'm sure we've all done something, whether it be from sheer negligence or being a bit gung ho after receiving our permits.

    I was a particularly bad example, though I always knew my backstop.

    Here's the quote from the other thread:

    'm sure I've told this before, or some of it anyway.

    Let me preface by saying that, when I was younger, I was more than a bit reckless and there are very few things I did then that I would do now.

    My first incident was with a person. My dog alerted in the middle of the night and ran silently to the front door. I grabbed my Ruger Super Single Six that wasn't officially loaded with .22 mag HP ammo and chased after. There was a guy pulling the front door shut to avoid my dog. I called my dog off, opened the door, aimed above the guy's head, and fired. He stood there... so I leveled it at his chest while cocking and began to slowly squeeze off. His paralysis broke and he ran, saving himself from a trigger-happy 16 year old. Dad found me in the morning barricaded behind the sofa, which I had pushed out, with all my .22s and shotguns. Not recommended.

    I had several run-ins with feral dogs as a teen, and I consider them all valid self-defense situations. I chased one into the woods, found myself facing the pack, fired a couple at what I figured to be the alpha male, and ran. When I cleared the firezone I yelled to my friend to loose the 12 gauge with buck. We had pulled my Jeep's motor, were trying to rebuild it, kept getting stalked, and got tired of it, so the long guns came out in addition to our pistols. We later did some exterminating. None of this pack had collars.

    The big one came when I was running security for a cab company while in college. I had gone on a high-risk run with the cabbie at night and when we got back to base, I saw that the plate glass window was busted in. I saw movement, so I told the cabbie to lock the doors and call the cops on the radio phone, then I got out and gave chase, pulling my pistol as I entered the shadows. I almost caught the guy too. But, that was just plain stupid. I was too gung ho, though in all fairness, I saw it as a personal failure and wanted to put it right in my employers' eyes, and my own. However, I should have stayed, secured the scene (meaning, kept everyone away from the place), and kept an eye on the cabbie.

    The big one was the attack dogs charging me (documented several places already, no need to revisit on yet another post), years after I wanted glory, and just wanted to be left alone.

    To those new to carrying, looking at my lessons learned, I would say this: Don't go looking for trouble. It finds you often enough as is. Keep a lower profile than you have in the past. You have a moral, if not legal (in your state), obligation to not escalate the situation. Example: In college I lived off campus. I took my clothes to a laudrymat where I encountered a bunch of young guys dressed in biker black with cheap knives strapped on everyplace. I was semi-surrounded and told that all the washers were taken (which they obviously weren't. I just said "Ok," and left. I was in the prime of my shooting skill at that point: a 20 year old body with no fat and all quick nerve and reaction. Though I wasn't as experienced in cover and concealment at the time, I could have likely made up for it with raw speed and talent. I'd already picked a spot on each gang member's body that I would hit, all likely lethal. But I didn't want to fight. I didn't even want to do laundry. I only did it because it needed to be done. I really wanted to go home and relax after classes and work.

    Having a CCW permit is not a license to kill. It only lets the police know that you're a good guy, and as such, you're expected to act accordingly.

    Just don't do anything that would fuel the anti-gunners or make a neutral party favor the criminal. I did this for too long and still regret it.

    As for the physological effects of fight or flight, I experienced auditory exclusion and time dialation, but that was really it. I saw my sights and indexed them. There were a couple times I actually aimed. My hearing isn't the best but it's by no means bad yet. I have it checked monthly (Mom's a speech pathologist and has an audiometer). I don't show symptoms of firing a 9mm three times, rapidly, in an enclosed space. Some people are just like that: The bones in the ears separate and keep damage from occuring. Or maybe I was just lucky. I don't know. I don't remember being numb; I definitely felt the trigger, and I don't think I mashed it, though I'm not 100% sure I didn't. I don't remember feeling anything; I did think right beforehand, "S***, here we go!" (Mods, that was my exact thinking; I usually do not swear), and the pistol "jumped into my hand." That comes from countless draws and practice. I don't remember drawing; it was just there.

    The least number of shots I've fired in 'defense' were two, with the max being six. The six were received by a 'possum that tried to climb my leg. Not knowing if it had rabies I shot it and kept at it until it stopped moving. The attack dogs got three.

    I was a person who took way too many risks. I'm not like that anymore; I've mellowed. I hope you, the new CCW permit holders, read this and make sound judgements.

    I am writing all of this in fear of being ridiculed. On another board when I posted something similar as a response to the same question as asked above, I was called a liar and fairly shunned from then on out. I hope this does not turn out to be the case here as I'm fond of this board. Maybe some just can't believe a person's capable of so many stupid moves. I dunno.

    At any rate, read, read, read, and PRACTICE. Shoot skeet with your handgun. Your scores won't be high but you'll hit them now and again and you'll learn. For shear speed, pinshooting is good. I think the best practice is vermin elimination, but few of us are lucky enough to have a place to do that.

    Josh <><
    In the words of Eastwood in Unforgiven, "I ain't like that no more. I'm just a fella now."

    In one of my first gunsmithing exeriences I did blow a hole through my windowsill with a .22. A week magazine spring was to blame. I had unloaded it and closed the bolt, and I pulled the trigger as this one was safe to dry fire once-in-a-while. I somehow missed the round going in and the round fired. I was however assuming it was loaded and keeping it pointed in a safe direction. I avoided shooting my friend with his own rifle. I still consider the NG stoopid though.

    Those are my confessions of a firearms enthusiast.

    Anyone care to add theirs?

    Josh <><
    12+ years accident free

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member Array SammyIamToday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    2,087
    I flagged my dad with a .410 when I was rabbit hunting at the age of 9. The subsequent beating and essay I had to write on gun safety have kept me clean for 15 years now. I'm very glad to have a good father.

  4. #3
    JD
    JD is online now
    Administrator
    Array JD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    18,887
    Well this happened to my dad at a match he was shooting, he borrowed a Colt 1911 in .38 at the last minute for some reason or another, instered the mag pointed the pistol at the deck, dropped the slide and sent all 5 rounds in the dirt....full auto, apparnetly the sear and action were so smooth you had to ride the slide down with your hand, not just hit the slide release and let slam home...

    Needless to say he got a lot of dirt looks from the range staff.

    Moral of the story:
    Never borrow a gun that your not ENTIRELY familar with and if you do, ask if anything special instructions to occur for proper operation.

  5. #4
    Ex Member Array Todd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    189
    Dumbest thing I ever did was when I was about 15. I was dragged deer hunting (I never enjoyed hunting, never will, not my thing) in Vermont with my uncle . Anyway, I was sitting out in the woods cross-legged with my .30-06 across my lap, bored and freezing my a$$ off, and started playing with the safety, which was right behind the trigger.

    Click, click.

    Click, click.

    Click, click.

    Click, BOOM!

    Scared the living crap out of me! I learned a valuable lesson that day.

  6. #5
    Member Array everalm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    22
    Scariest one that happened around me but not to me.....

    Section came back in from a long nights street patrol on Belfast, all the men dog-tired and edgy, been a nasty little riot.

    The chaps once back in the sangar have to unload weapons, L1A1 rifle, 7.62mm FAL's basically, 20 round mags, in the unload bays.

    Basically these are U shaped concrete bays you stand in, check safety is applied, unload mag, clear working parts 3-4 times, inspect chamber, let working parts fly to front, squeeze trigger, apply safety, call "weapons clear", rinse and repeat with the next chap.

    I was walking to the comms room, past the bays, when we had a "little problem".

    Remember I said the guys were dog tired, 4 hours on, 4 off, back to back, little sleep etc.

    One of them had, before patrol, diligently stripped and cleaned his rifle, so far so good. Unfortunately he decided to go past the normal basic strip and had removed the firing pin from the block and was cleaning the pin before suddenly being screamed at by his corporal to get his arse into gear we going NOW!!!!!

    He re-assembled, unfortunately he also got a chunk of wadding stick behind the firing pin which in a hurry he rammed closed. End result is the working parts now have the firing pin in a fully extruded position.

    When he is now back from patrol he steps into the bay, and is so shattered he forgets to drop the mag before he starts to work the action. Normally this isn't a problem, stuff happens, so the bay has a trough to catch ejected brass just in case. If either you or the NCO hears the tinkle of brass you know to stop (and get screamed at).

    Trouble is the protruding firing pin......

    First pull back, no problems, no rounds chambered, working parts go forward, strip a round from the magazine and just keeps on going. Round chambers, firing pin does what it is supposed to do, round fires, and away we go, 20 rounds rip out.

    The poor bugger is an example that God looks after fools....the weapon is moving around like a bloody snake, 20 rounds of military 7.62 are ricocheting around and out of the bay he doesn't get a scratch........from the weapon.

    He wished all 20 rounds had hit him after the Company Sergeant Major had finished BEFORE having to stand in front of the Colonel who was less than pleased about filling in a lot of reports about not 1 but 20 ND's.

    Oh, it wasn't me I swear !!
    As one of my old sergeants used to say. "WE do not play at spray and play.......Do we.... Sir....."

    Remember children, when we have removed the pin from Mr Grenade, Mr Grenade is no longer our friend......

  7. #6
    Member Array PolarBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Garland, NC (About 25 miles east of Fayetteville)
    Posts
    231
    During a yearly firearms training class (at work), my instructor was demonstrating the proper loading and unloading of a revolver during a firefight. Mind you, this is all done in a classroom setting NOT at the range. To remain "safe" he used empty brass for the demonstration (he did not have any dummy rounds). At this time he proceeded to load the revolver. He "clicked" through 6 rounds (while pointing the gun in a "safe" direction), dumped the brass, quickly loaded 6 more "used" brass, and then repeated with a click click BANG. I never thought a primer sounded so loud in a small classroom. You should have seen the look on this guys face. We then took a "scheduled break". After our chief heard about this, he does not "click" through the brass anymore.
    "Personal weapons are what raised mankind out of the mud..."
    -Jeff Cooper, "The Art of the Rifle"

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Doc Holliday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,675
    Well since I was one of the more vocal ones on the other thread I am not without sin as well.

    I had a ND when I was shooting clay targets one afternoon when I was about 17-18 years old. I let my trigger finger get too close to the trigger and BOOM the old 870 goes off. I had the barrel pointed downrange thankfully and nobody got hurt. It was embarrassing and I learned a very important lesson that day. Finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
    Why Ike, whatever do you mean? Maybe poker's just not your game Ike. I know! Let's have a spelling contest!

  9. #8
    Member Array Huzar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    470
    Speaking of handling other people's weapons. I went shooting with a buddy of mine and he handed me his revolver (can't remember specificaly what it was but a ruger 357 somehow seems to make sense). Anyways, as I was drawing down on the target (I started with the gun pointing slightly upwards and I was in process of lowering it) I feathered the trigger and it went off. Scared the hell out of me, nailed the hanger for the target and made the whole target setup do the boogie. Turns out that it had a feather trigger and he forgot to warn me. So I was guilty of two things:
    1. touching the trigger when I was not yet ready to shoot
    2. not finding out more info about the weapon I was just about ready to shoot

    I can say that next time I handled someone elses gun I asked a loooooooooooooooooot of questions before I even set my eyes on it

  10. #9
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    34,578

    Exclamation This One Is True

    It's from another forum & it happened years ago.

    The guy who slept with his firearm on the nightstand & dreamed that he heard the telephone ringing and woke up to discover that he had (in reality) "Answered His Glock" and had his finger on the trigger and his firearm pointed at his damn dumb head.

    I couldn't make that one up folks.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  11. #10
    Member Array PolarBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Garland, NC (About 25 miles east of Fayetteville)
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    It's from another forum & it happened years ago.

    The guy who slept with his firearm on the nightstand & dreamed that he heard the telephone ringing and woke up to discover that he had (in reality) "Answered His Glock" and had his finger on the trigger and his firearm pointed at his damn dumb head.

    I couldn't make that one up folks.
    A "wake up call" in more ways than one.
    "Personal weapons are what raised mankind out of the mud..."
    -Jeff Cooper, "The Art of the Rifle"

  12. #11
    New Member Array primer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Great N.W.
    Posts
    12
    well this happed to me and my friend when we were 18, we were driving over the 405 bridge and he handed me his fully loaded and cocked 1911 .45 acp needless to say that made uneasy that he would hand me his gun to look at in this state, so I proceeded make the gun safe by decocking the hammer, oops hit a little bump in the road, and blew a hole right threw his floor. We both learned something that day

  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array lowflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Posts
    1,221
    I saw a gunner drop the barrel of an M240 from a moving helicopter.

    I also witnessed a Marine lose part of his index finger in the breech of an M2 while flying over Kuwait.
    Whatever doesn't kill you postpones the inevitable.

  14. #13
    Ex Member Array Ghost Who Walks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    79
    I was standing next to a guy on a busy firing line, one time, when I heard his Ruger Blackhawk go off with a muffled sound. Naturally, I assumed he was going to stop shooting, put the gun down, and take a look.

    Nope, as I watched, he drew the hammer back, again, and began to take aim. I lowered my own pistol and threw out my left-hand to grab his Ruger before the hammer fell. He pulled the trigger just as my thumb went between the hammer and frame. (Ouch, that hurt!)

    He looked at me with this, 'What, the H, are you doing' expression on his face? I told him that last shot he fired didn't sound right! When he opened the cylinder and looked, sure enough, there was a lead slug stuck half-way down the barrel.

    I expected to get a reward, or something. Maybe a new gun, dinner for me and the wife - something! Fact is, he never even stopped to say, 'Thanks!' Guess he was, still, mad at me for grabbing the gun!

    (That's people.)

  15. #14
    JD
    JD is online now
    Administrator
    Array JD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    18,887
    ouch, we had a neglegent discharge from a SAW gunner...someone for got the whole open bolt thing when clearing a weapon and chambered a round, BANG

  16. #15
    JD
    JD is online now
    Administrator
    Array JD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    18,887
    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost Who Walks View Post

    I expected to get a reward, or something. Maybe a new gun, dinner for me and the wife - something! Fact is, he never even stopped to say, 'Thanks!' Guess he was, still, mad at me for grabbing the gun!

    (That's people.)

    It never fails, the ones you save are too stupid to realize it.

Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Montana - Public Safety v. Private Safety
    By DOGOFWAR01 in forum The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 15th, 2009, 04:34 PM
  2. Smart or Stoopid
    By ppkheat in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: July 18th, 2008, 08:26 AM
  3. Ricochet: Confessions of a Gun Lobbyist
    By biasedbulldog in forum Defensive Books, Video & References
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: January 12th, 2008, 05:08 AM
  4. S&W 1911 grip safety/FP safety problems?
    By sheepdog in forum Defensive Carry Guns
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: December 8th, 2007, 12:24 PM
  5. Ricochet: Confessions of a Gun Lobbyist
    By danalog02 in forum Defensive Books, Video & References
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: August 31st, 2007, 02:07 PM

Search tags for this page

safety breeched rifle

,

shottings stingers in mossberg 702

Click on a term to search for related topics.