Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

This is a discussion on Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I don't. The only time I pull the trigger when not actually firing or dry-firing my Glock 30 is when I'm disassembling it. (I wish ...

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 126
Like Tree71Likes

Thread: Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

  1. #31
    VIP Member
    Array BenGoodLuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,254
    I don't. The only time I pull the trigger when not actually firing or dry-firing my Glock 30 is when I'm disassembling it. (I wish Glock could have figured out a better way to prep the gun for disassembly!)
    Ben

    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.
    I think, therefore I am armed.


    (Don Mann, The Modern Day Gunslinger; the ultimate handgun training manual)

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #32
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,084
    When I drop the mag or open the wheel. On the Auto pull the slide back eject round look in chamber there is no reason to pull the trigger to prove it is empty.
    Now if you need to drop the hammer fine but not to prove it is unloaded it is.

  4. #33
    Member Array jrclen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    342
    No I don't. My final check is to look.
    Shall not be infringed means - shall not be infringed.
    Member - NRA
    John

  5. #34
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    erie PA
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by darbo View Post
    I'm not sure if this relates to your question but in IDPA and USPSA matches part of the exercise when you are done with the course of fire is that you release the mag, rack the slide to eject the round and show the SO the chamber is empty, hammer down (pull trigger, not decock) and finally holster firearm.
    Yes, I've read that - interesting!

  6. #35
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    erie PA
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    It doesn't matter to me if one pulls the trigger or not. But I don't understand your logic. If they have ND's at IDPA and IPSC events then they did not clear the gun to begin with. If you clear your gun properly then how can their be an AD/ND by pulling the trigger? I guess what I am saying is under your logic, if someone did not clear the weapon properly then they are walking around with a loaded weapon with a round in the chamber anyway. Sooner or later THAT is an accident waiting to happen. Now, I am assuming for those that use it as a final check that they at least have the muzzle facing in a safe direction.

    I pull the trigger after clearing but not as a check. Call it habit or the original way I was taught.

    Either way, one should always follow the safety rules.
    FROM OP:

    The purpose of pulling the trigger is a fail-safe, in case you made an error with other checks. The mere fact that there were discharges from supposedly empty guns would prove that, a mistake was made.

    HERE'S AN EXAMPLE of WHY YOU SHOULD ALWAYS CHECK TO SEE IF A GUN IS UNLOADED- NO MATTER HOW YOU ANSWER MY ORIGINAL QUESTION: When i first got my Colt WWI Reproduction, after about a month, the slide would stay back as it does when a gun is empty. SURPRISE! It WASN'T EMPTY! It still would have one live around in it, all chambered and ready to go. So, say I don't know that yet and I do a very human thing, I'm in a hurry, decide to go and check the gun later. Then forget later. THEN............ well you can fill it in.

    (The present gun now, 10 months later, has another little safety glitch: the hammer DROPS with no finger being anywhere near the trigger - it drops when the slide cycles, and a live round gets jammed - in the barrel. In other words, rack the slide and the hammer falls.)

    Going back to Colt, on the night-train.

    MY POINT: GUNS CAN SCREW UP: ALWAYS CHECK FOR UNLOAD. !!

  7. #36
    Distinguished Member Array shockwave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,789
    How does one "decock" an SR9c?
    It's a lot easy after you remove the mag-disconnect safety. Then you can drop the mag, clear the chamber, and drop the firing pin.

    To remove the safety, just follow the procedure to remove and clean the firing pin. When you extract the pin, the mag-disconnect safety will pop out of its channel and you can lose it. Improves the trigger feel, too.

    To the OP: No, pulling the trigger would only be to release the hammer or firing pin tension. If you have any doubt as to whether the gun is really empty or not, obtain additional instruction - by an NRA instructor or similar, who can show you how to make your gun safe, safely.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  8. #37
    Member Array craze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    430
    I don't do it but on a Glock and other striker fired pistols pulling the trigger on an empty chamber provides a visual indication the gun is not hot because trigger is in the rearward position.
    "The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference - they deserve a place of honor with all that's good.
    --George Washington

  9. #38
    Member Array Simonsay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by tcox4freedom View Post
    same here. I only pull the trigger on an empty gun when i intend to disassemble. One reason i've stayed away from idpa & ipsc is this practice. I have seen nds at every event i've been to because of this.

    Imho; it is a pointless & potentially dangerous practice. Clear your firearm the way it supposed to be done; visually & physically check the chamber to be certain it is empty; then let it be. There is no practical reason to pull the trigger on an empty firearm unless it's to disassemble for cleaning or repair. (even dry fire practice can be done with a snap cap. So, there's no need to practice it on an empty chamber.)

    -
    really... I've got to call horse apples on this one. ADs at every event? I've competed in action pistol for 8 or 9 years. I'm in my 6th year as a USPSA RO, have worked one of the largest matches in the Nation for 5 years, multiple Area matches, regional and countless club matches, and I've yet to see a single AD during the ULSC. I have heard of it happening, yes, but every event... is exactly how many?

    There is a specific reason for the hammer down at the ULSC. It verifies what two sets of eyes should have already seen, an empty chamber. The shooter hammers down with the gun pointed at the berm, the same one they were just shooting into. It cant be pointless to confirm, so I'm not even going to ax, but please tell me how this is dangerous? I dry fire damn near every day, and I'm in the habit of dropping the hammer/striker when I unload, in a safe direction. Safety first.
    Last edited by Simonsay; May 13th, 2012 at 06:34 PM.

  10. #39
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    erie PA
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by Simonsay View Post
    really... I've got to call horse apples on this one. ADs at every event? I've competed in action pistol for 8 or 9 years. I'm in my 6th year as a USPSA RO, have worked one of the largest match in the Nation for 5 years, multiple Area matches, regional and countless club matches, and I've yet to see a single AD during the ULSC. I have heard of it happening, yes, but every event... is exactly how many?

    There is a specific reason for the hammer down at the ULSC. It verifies what two sets of eyes should have already seen, an empty chamber. The shooter hammers down with the gun pointed at the berm, the same one they were just shooting into. It cant be pointless to confirm, so I'm not even going to ax, but please tell me how this is dangerous? I dry fire damn near every day, and I'm in the habit of dropping the hammer/striker when I unload, in a safe direction. Safety first.
    Right. If you screwed up your visual/touch check, a round going off with the gun pointed towards a large container of sand will be loud, may bring the LEOs, and will be very embarrassing. But that is MUCH better than failing the checks with eye and finger and not knowing it - especially if you shoot yourself, a family member or anybody with your "empty" gun the next day.

  11. #40
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wetumpka, AL
    Posts
    915
    Quote Originally Posted by discoboxer View Post
    I don't do it to verify the gun is unloaded via "unload check".

    I do however consider it as releasing the pin, thus to add an extra safety measure, the slide has to be racked again when intending to load and shoot. Maybe it's just semantics or a difference in intention.
    Me too, though I point the barrel into the mattress!
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

    "To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them..." George Mason

  12. #41
    Member Array ccwillinois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    ILLINOIS
    Posts
    42
    My chamber is always left open while stored in the safe, this way on all my weapons. Open chamber can always be visually checked and can't be fired.

  13. #42
    Distinguished Member Array Burns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Oshkosh, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,330
    I only pull the trigger after re-assembling after cleaning to ensure everything is in working order. There's no need to pull the trigger after taking a round out of the chamber.

  14. #43
    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Posts
    3,216
    No pulling the trigger like that for me. Visual inspection of the chamber/cylinders and if needs be feeling inside with a finger should suffice.
    "Was there no end to the conspiracy of irrational prejudice against Red Ryder and his peacemaker?"

    Revolvers, “more elegant weapons for a more civilized age.”

  15. #44
    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wichita Falls Tx.
    Posts
    1,294
    No, I don't pull the trigger to check if the gun is loaded/unloaded.......ever.......Thats just stupid.
    Stop whining and go make a difference!
    If you think that I may be talking to you, then I am.

  16. #45
    Member Array garwha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Lindale, Texas
    Posts
    100
    Unloaded, what's that? On the question, not so much, there are better ways, but some require hammer down for field strip, and some of my guns I store with the springs uploaded.

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

are you supposed to pull the trigger after unloading gun
,
do you pull the trigger when clearing weapons
,
how do u call the gun's trigger
,

is it bad to pull the trigger on an unloaded gun

,

is it bad to pull trigger of unloaded gun

,
pull trigger storage
,
pulling trigger on glock after unloading?
,
pulling trigger unloaded shotgun
,
the only way to test a gun is to pull the trigger
,
when a glock is unloaded and u pull the trigger dose the trigger stay back
,
why do people pull the trigger when clearing a gun
,
why pull the trigger after racking an empty glock
Click on a term to search for related topics.