Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

This is a discussion on Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; To me, a trigger pull is never part of the is it loaded or unloaded question. It is part of shooting, dry firing practice, and ...

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Thread: Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

  1. #46
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    To me, a trigger pull is never part of the is it loaded or unloaded question. It is part of shooting, dry firing practice, and part of the takedown procedure on certain firearms. I have a procedure where I pull the mag, cycle the action numerous times, perform a visual and tactile check and can then get on with whatever needs to be done. Storage, cleaning, dry fire practice. I always perform this check again first off when handling a firearm. It doesn't matter if I unloaded it 10 minutes before I fielded the phone call telling me to pick up cat litter, ice cream and Hoppes #9 on my way home or was handed it in a gun shop or whatever. This ensures that every weapon that is intended to be loaded is actually loaded before hanging on my hip or unloaded where appropriate.

    Dry firing is really good practice, smooths a trigger pull and is generally well tolerated by most firearms. I'm sure there are very specific exceptions to that rule though.

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  3. #47
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZJD1968 View Post
    No, I don't pull the trigger to check if the gun is loaded/unloaded.......ever.......Thats just stupid.
    No, it's not unsafe - some would say NOT pulling the trigger was stupid. See what I already posted:

    "If you screwed up your visual/touch check, a round going off with the gun pointed towards a large container of sand will be loud, may bring the LEOs, and will be very embarrassing. But that is MUCH better than failing the checks with eye and finger and not knowing it - especially if you shoot yourself, a family member or anybody with your "empty" gun the next day."

    I'm not absolutely sure but I believe most gun accidents involving injury/death occur with guns "that aren't loaded"

  4. #48
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    Unless I missed something we are all agreeing on this:Nobody pulls the trigger as a check to see if the gun is unloaded. Some will do it for maintenance or because they think it is good for any springs involved. But they have already checked to see it is unloaded and pointed in a safe direction. Just don't see what the big deal is.
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  5. #49
    New Member Array dmont's Avatar
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    If I have ANY suspision that the gun might, could possible be in any way, shape or form loaded, I ain't touching the trigger just to find out. I can assure myself by visual and tactual inspection. It's a "rule #1" thing.

    I will however, having confirmed the absence of chambered rounds, pull the trigger to release the striker/hammer, especially when field stripping the sidearm for cleaning or maintaince.



    ...whittled wit my Razr Maxx...
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  6. #50
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    As others have said, pulling the trigger is done for firing or for dry-fire practice after I have checked to make sure the gun in unloaded. I don't pull unless I'm sure that it's loaded or that it's unloaded; never when I'm unsure (as a check).
    AZJD1968 likes this.
    "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." - Ephesians 2:8-9

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  7. #51
    Ex Member Array apvbguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walleye View Post
    Just wondering, how many do a an "unloaded check" of their semi-autos with a final one of pointing the weapon in a safe direction and pulling the trigger, the ultimate test of whether a gun is empty.

    I don't but thought maybe I should start the practice. Now I check visually after I drop the mag and eject the chambered round, and stick my pinkie into the barrel opening as a second check. And that's it.

    How about you?

    Thanks

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I drop the mag, rack the gun and visually make sure it is empty, pulling the trigger is not necessary. I do this anytime I handle any pistol

  8. #52
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    Unless I missed something we are all agreeing on this:Nobody pulls the trigger as a check to see if the gun is unloaded. Some will do it for maintenance or because they think it is good for any springs involved. But they have already checked to see it is unloaded and pointed in a safe direction. Just don't see what the big deal is.
    No, some think you should as the final check, including me whose moving that way - fact I did it the last two times I unloaded my gun home.

    The rationale is what I wrote previously:

    "No, it's not unsafe - some would say NOT pulling the trigger was :

    "If you screwed up your visual/touch check, a round going off with the gun pointed towards a large container of sand will be loud, may bring the LEOs, and will be very embarrassing. But that is MUCH better than failing the checks with eye and finger and not knowing it - especially if you shoot yourself, a family member or anybody with your "empty" gun the next day."

    I'm not absolutely sure but I believe most gun accidents involving injury/death occur with guns "that aren't loaded" "


    I also avoid the whole unloading and loading cycle usually by keeping semi-autos that I use for Carry loaded in the safe. Most can be cleaned at the range - or if I want to home, well then I do unload/load.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    My general philosophy for gun-safety is the less you handle them outside of a range with the gun pointed down range, the less chance you have of an accident to start with. So, the less the better.

  9. #53
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    While better than shooting someone, I really don't want to put holes in my ceiling or floor by pulling the trigger on a loaded gun when I thought it was unloaded. I'd rather be extremely thorough with my visual and finger check, thereby negating the need to purposefully pull the trigger as part of my routine.
    AZJD1968 likes this.
    "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." - Ephesians 2:8-9

    “The purpose of the law is not to prevent a future offense, but to punish the one actually committed” - Ayn Rand

  10. #54
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaDawg View Post
    While better than shooting someone, I really don't want to put holes in my ceiling or floor by pulling the trigger on a loaded gun when I thought it was unloaded. I'd rather be extremely thorough with my visual and finger check, thereby negating the need to purposefully pull the trigger as part of my routine.
    Well, there are people who have accidents that either did (1) what they remember as being a careful check or perhaps (2) were tired, carrying on a conversation, thinking of a serious problem in their life etc., etc., all the things we say we won't do - but, being human....

    So, it's a fail-safe -- something that will, out of 1 in a 1000 times maybe, give us a bad situation rather than a tragedy. That's all it is. It's like the little red seat-belt icon that goes on on your dashboard if your seat-belt isn't fastened. After all these years, fastening my seat-belt is both automatic and something I notice in 2 seconds if it's not.

    BUT..... every once in a while: the little red light goes on.

  11. #55
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    @walleye:If you feel the need to pull the trigger to ensure the gun is unloaded IN YOUR HOUSE then you need to rethink your confidence in guns. JMO

  12. #56
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walleye View Post
    Well, there are people who have accidents that either did (1) what they remember as being a careful check or perhaps (2) were tired, carrying on a conversation, thinking of a serious problem in their life etc., etc., all the things we say we won't do - but, being human....

    So, it's a fail-safe -- something that will, out of 1 in a 1000 times maybe, give us a bad situation rather than a tragedy. That's all it is. It's like the little red seat-belt icon that goes on on your dashboard if your seat-belt isn't fastened. After all these years, fastening my seat-belt is both automatic and something I notice in 2 seconds if it's not.

    BUT..... every once in a while: the little red light goes on.
    I understand that it's perceived as an additional safety check, and I understand the justification behind it. But, I think accidentally discharging a firearm is a failure to apply proper and necessary safety measures. If an accidental discharge is the direct result of a safety measure, then it's not an adequate safety measure, IMHO. I won't be utilizing a trigger pull as a final safety check but will make a conscious effort to not do anything distracting when handling my firearms so that such a measure should not be necessary. I'd rather visually and physically inspect the chamber a dozen times than have an accidental discharge. I won't bash anyone who does a trigger check so long as they don't rely on it as their primary means of ensuring an empty chamber (not that anyone here is doing that).
    suntzu and AZJD1968 like this.
    "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." - Ephesians 2:8-9

    “The purpose of the law is not to prevent a future offense, but to punish the one actually committed” - Ayn Rand

  13. #57
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    @walleye:If you feel the need to pull the trigger to ensure the gun is unloaded IN YOUR HOUSE then you need to rethink your confidence in guns. JMO
    Lookit, skip it. You don't understand that such errors cause plenty of accidents - simply by nature of being human - and while the odds are small this will happen to any one person, they happen. The fail-safe trigger-pull is designed for human error - and is done in a setting and into something absolutely safe should there be a discharge, and your ceiling is not one of those places.

    If you don't want to do it, don't.

    I posted what I do to avoid most problems - so the above is not my usual practice either, but for different reasons.

  14. #58
    VIP Member Array Thunder71's Avatar
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    No, I don't 'check' by pulling the trigger... if I pull the trigger I've already checked to the point I know the gun isn't loaded. The only time I pull the trigger is:

    1. Dry fire practice
    2. At the range
    3. For some guns it's required for a field strip

    All gun safety rules still apply.

  15. #59
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaDawg View Post
    I understand that it's perceived as an additional safety check, and I understand the justification behind it. But, I think accidentally discharging a firearm is a failure to apply proper and necessary safety measures. If an accidental discharge is the direct result of a safety measure, then it's not an adequate safety measure, IMHO. I won't be utilizing a trigger pull as a final safety check but will make a conscious effort to not do anything distracting when handling my firearms so that such a measure should not be necessary. I'd rather visually and physically inspect the chamber a dozen times than have an accidental discharge. I won't bash anyone who does a trigger check so long as they don't rely on it as their primary means of ensuring an empty chamber (not that anyone here is doing that).
    It's not done to ensure you won't have an unintential discharge. It is done to ensure you won't have an unintentional discharge into someone's face.

  16. #60
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walleye View Post
    It's not done to ensure you won't have an unintential discharge. It is done to ensure you won't have an unintentional discharge into someone's face.
    I understand the intent, but believe it to be a potentially hazardous and unnecessary precaution. I don't think any step in the safety check process should have, as a potential consequence, the unintentional discharge of the weapon. Removing the magazine should not discharge a loaded firearm. A visual inspection should not discharge a loaded firearm. A physical/finger inspection should not discharge a loaded firearm. Pulling the trigger will almost certainly discharge a loaded firearm (allowing for misfires, engaged gun safeties, etc.)

    There's a reason why we should not put our finger on the trigger unless we are ready to destroy whatever the gun is pointed at, and that's because we always assume the gun is loaded. If you have your wits about you, you should be able to properly determine whether or not a gun is hot without having your finger on the trigger. If your mind isn't focused, you shouldn't be handling the firearm to begin with. I'm sorry, but this method just isn't for me.
    "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast." - Ephesians 2:8-9

    “The purpose of the law is not to prevent a future offense, but to punish the one actually committed” - Ayn Rand

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