Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger? - Page 5

Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

This is a discussion on Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by GeorgiaDawg I understand the intent, but believe it to be a potentially hazardous and unnecessary precaution. I don't think any step in ...

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Thread: Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?

  1. #61
    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaDawg View Post
    I understand the intent, but believe it to be a potentially hazardous and unnecessary precaution. I don't think any step in the safety check process should have, as a potential consequence, the unintentional discharge of the weapon. Removing the magazine should not discharge a loaded firearm. A visual inspection should not discharge a loaded firearm. A physical/finger inspection should not discharge a loaded firearm. Pulling the trigger will almost certainly discharge a loaded firearm (allowing for misfires, engaged gun safeties, etc.)

    There's a reason why we should not put our finger on the trigger unless we are ready to destroy whatever the gun is pointed at, and that's because we always assume the gun is loaded. If you have your wits about you, you should be able to properly determine whether or not a gun is hot without having your finger on the trigger. If your mind isn't focused, you shouldn't be handling the firearm to begin with. I'm sorry, but this method just isn't for me.
    Agreed.
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  2. #62
    Member Array Simonsay's Avatar
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    For those that don't want to do this, I certainly understand. For those of you thinking this is a step in unloading the gun, you missed the point.

  3. #63
    Ex Member Array walleye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZJD1968 View Post
    Agreed.
    1) It's set up - like the container of sand - so an actual shot will not destroy anything.

    2) I agree, no one should have gun accidents, car accidents, snow-blower accidents, power-tool accidents, cut themselves, fall down stairs, take the wrong pill by mistake, have fires in houses from lit candles and worn wires, trip on the rug, fall off a cliff, swim too far out and drown, crash their boat into rocks, smack their heads on open kitchen cabinets or anything that they do have accidents doing unless it is from faulty mechanical equipment which they should not have had checked.

    And obviously, no one ever has any of these things occur because they shouldn't and don't. And therefore:

    gun accidents, car accidents, snow-blower accidents, power-tool accidents, cut themselves, fall down stairs, take the wrong pill by mistake, have fires in houses from lit candles and worn wires, trip on the rug, fall off a cliff, swim too far out and drown, crash their boat into rocks, smack their heads on open kitchen cabinets or anything that they do have accidents doing unless it is from faulty mechanical equipment which they should not have had checked and a thousand more:

    never happen or ever have.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I think it's fine if you don't want to do this last check of an "unloaded" gun, but predicating it on some prediction of infallibility is always dangerous.

    For me, I mentioned avoiding loading and unloading outside of the range anyhow - and storing Carry guns loaded in the safe - most of the time.

    So, I'm suggesting what I believe is an ultimate fail-safe. But I've no stakes in it so will leave all to choose as they will - which most already have - with no problem at all here.
    Last edited by walleye; May 15th, 2012 at 03:46 AM.

  4. #64
    Distinguished Member Array AZJD1968's Avatar
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    I was taught to keep my finger off of the trigger until I wanted to shoot or strip. I will not waver from this. If I get in the habbit of pulling the trigger every time I unload it, if I screw up dropping the mag and racking the slide a few times, then looking inside, I'm not going to pull the trigger to verify. If I feel I need to check again I will repeat the process with my finger off of the trigger.
    By the way, I store my guns with the slide locked back, bolts open, so the trigger can't be pulled and you can see in the chamber and breach. Sometimes I lock them open.... I dont need to pull the trigger. If the guns slide or bolt is closed , in my opinion, it is loaded = finger off the trigger. If anyone wants to pull the trigger to check if it's loaded....thats your prerogative.
    GeorgiaDawg likes this.
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  5. #65
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonsay View Post
    For those of you thinking this is a step in unloading the gun, you missed the point.
    The title of this thread is "Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?", which leads me to believe this is another safety check for making sure a gun is unloaded. If this isn't a step in unloading the gun, or the point was something other than to discuss the benefits of a trigger pull test, I must have misunderstood the topic and I apologize. If If this is a step for making sure a gun is unloaded, I will stand by my stance that the trigger should not be pulled as a test to see if a gun is loaded. Pulling the trigger, to me, means I already know it's loaded or unloaded based on a multi-step verification process that does not include a trigger pull.
    AZJD1968 likes this.
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  6. #66
    Ex Member Array apvbguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaDawg View Post
    The title of this thread is "Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by Pulling the Trigger?", which leads me to believe this is another safety check for making sure a gun is unloaded. If this isn't a step in unloading the gun, or the point was something other than to discuss the benefits of a trigger pull test, I must have misunderstood the topic and I apologize. If If this is a step for making sure a gun is unloaded, I will stand by my stance that the trigger should not be pulled as a test to see if a gun is loaded. Pulling the trigger, to me, means I already know it's loaded or unloaded based on a multi-step verification process that does not include a trigger pull.
    I'll repeat my earlier comment which was a trigger pull is an unnecessary and redundant step.

    dropping the mag then racking the slide open and visually inspecting the chamber to be sure that no round is present is sufficient to be sure your weapon is empty and safe to handle.
    I believe that this process is RULE #1 and I do it whenever I touch a gun, doing this each and every time has saved me from an ND and IMHO it should be a part of everyone's gun handling procedure.
    GeorgiaDawg and AZJD1968 like this.

  7. #67
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Pulling the trigger to check if it's unloaded is ridiculous in my opinion. I hope nobody ever finds out it was loaded through this procedure.
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  8. #68
    Senior Member Array taseal's Avatar
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    I'm gonna start a new thread

    Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by looking down the barrel?

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericb327 View Post
    Pulling the trigger to check if it's unloaded is ridiculous in my opinion. I hope nobody ever finds out it was loaded through this procedure.
    I can't tell if it's sarcasm / humor or not, but I did laugh, then scratched my head (confused). Guys, this ain't rocket surgery.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    If you have a glass of water on the table in front of you and you pick the glass up and drink the whole glass of water...it is not necessary to turn the glass upside down just to be absolutely certain that the glass is empty.
    Agreed. And another thought to consider:

    Say it's an opaque glass and you take what you believe to be the final drink. You tip the glass to your mouth a second time to double check. Not only do you not have to turn the glass upside down to ensure it's empty, on the off chance you were wrong it'll spill the water. Why take even the smallest risk? Assuming you left water in it somehow and didn't notice, if you never tip it upside down and just store it properly till the next time it's to be used, you'll either check it then and discover you were incorrect, having made no mess, or you'll just load it up with more water until it's full, again having made no mess.

    Just store the gun with the slide locked back, or closed if you like. The next time you insert a mag, rack the slide to load it. If a rounds chambers and none ejects, you were right. If a round ejects, you were wrong about it being unloaded. But because you didn't pull the trigger, you still don't have a problem.
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  11. #71
    Senior Member Array DoctorBob's Avatar
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    At IDPA matches we do an "unload and show clear," then "slide forward," then "hammer down," "holster," while pointed in a safe direction. after each COF. It's a double check and just in case there's somehow a round in the chamber that got left in despite the 'show clear' command, it verifies that the pistol is now empty. Even then, you should assume that the gun is loaded !
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  12. #72
    Senior Member Array Slim_45's Avatar
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    NO...not to confirm empty but i do have to pull the trigger on the Glock & Diamond Back (after confirming its empty) to disassemble them but dont like it
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  13. #73
    Senior Member Array Slim_45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taseal View Post
    I'm gonna start a new thread

    Do You Do A Final "Unloaded' Check by looking down the barrel?
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  14. #74
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    I'm not even going to ask if the people opposed to this practice, ever dry fire their guns. It has an been entertaining thread. My thanks to the OP.

  15. #75
    Senior Member Array GeorgiaDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonsay View Post
    I'm not even going to ask if the people opposed to this practice, ever dry fire their guns. It has an been entertaining thread. My thanks to the OP.
    The issue isn't about pulling the trigger when you know the gun isn't loaded, but pulling the trigger to make sure it isn't loaded, as a safety check. I believe I mentioned dry firing as a reason to pull the trigger in a previous post. I have no problem pulling the trigger for practicing (with live rounds at a range or dry fire practice with or without snap caps), but I don't think it should done as an empty-check.
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