Concealed carry wheelchair user

Concealed carry wheelchair user

This is a discussion on Concealed carry wheelchair user within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Are there any other wheelchair users here that conceal carry? If so what are your methods of carrying? I was going to post a picture ...

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Thread: Concealed carry wheelchair user

  1. #1
    New Member Array TxWheels's Avatar
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    Concealed carry wheelchair user

    Are there any other wheelchair users here that conceal carry? If so what are your methods of carrying? I was going to post a picture of how I conceal carry using a wheelchair holster adapter but for some reason it won't let me.


  2. #2
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    try this out, this guy has a good system

    QUICK HANDGUN ACCESS FOR THE WHEELCHAIR-BOUND

    http://backwoodshome.com/blogs/Massa...elchair-bound/

    http://www.scotworksllc.com/ Price: $44.50 plus shipping & handling



  3. #3
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    I would imagine this would be a nice set up for those who want to carry on a bike too

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    Member Array redbeardsong's Avatar
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    I'm not too keen on having to use your strong hand to pull off the cover before being able to draw.

  5. #5
    GH
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    VIP Member Array GH's Avatar
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    The problem I see with that is what happens if the person in the wheelchair gets dumped unexpectedly? Now he's separated from his weapon.
    Glenn

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  6. #6
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    Some people can find bad in finding a 20 dollar bill. I personally am not in a wheel chair so I can't speak from experience but when you get the endorsements of some of the people like Massad Ayoob and the shooting leagues for use in competition it has to have more ups then downs. When someone comes up with the perfect holster then let us all know.

    the gun locks in to the holster so it is secure. let’s face it someone is in a wheel chair is very limited in the first place so chances are if they are thrown from their chair they are not going to get up and draw their weapon.

    Here is a test; put your gun on and lay down. Without using your legs to upright or rotate yourself tell me how good you do. Make the test fair and make sure you land on your gun side as well as you left or even face down. Yea I know “at least I will have it”… are you sure... you might lose it getting dumped!

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    Member Array BigRay's Avatar
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    When I was confined to a wheelchair for several months following a motorcycle crash, I simply wore a Coronado Leather CCW fanny pack with built-in holster. A fanny pack on someone in a wheelchair is not going to scream "GUN." In fact, most people won't even notice it. The beauty of the Coronado Leather CCW fanny pack is that it is extremely easy to use while seated: simply pull a hidden ripcord and the whole front of the pack opens, allowing you to easily and quickly grab your handgun. Check it out: Original Coronado Stealth Pac
    Now that I'm able to walk with a cane, it's still a very viable means of carry. People notice your cane far more quickly than something you're wearing, like a fanny pack. Occasionally pull your keys or cell phone or wallet, etc., out of one of the zipper pockets, and people won't imagine that you've got a handgun on your waist! Of course, if you can find a carry a cane (I like rustic or exotic wooden canes), that will draw more attention away from your form of carry. To help draw people's eyes away from my fanny pack while in my wheelchair, I had a friend at a local machine shop construct some fake chrome exhaust headers that we bolted on the back of my wheelchair to give it a drag car look. Worked perfectly!
    One more thought on carrying while using a cane: I originally tried cross-draw holsters (I'm right handed, but carry my cane in my left hand), but found that it was awkward to pull up my shirt or push back a jacket while hanging onto the cane. Surprisingly, I found it easiest to wear my fanny pack just to the left of center, where my cane hand could easily grab the ripcord and give it a yank.
    BigRay

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  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array RevolvingMag's Avatar
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    Maybe look into a good shoulder harness. I have a cheap nylon rig that ran me about $50 all told- harness and a replacement holster that would fit my 1911- that I mostly use when driving, or would be perfect on a motorcycle.

    A lot of people don't like them because they call them uncomfortable- and it can be- but it's a lot more comfortable knowing that I can get to my gun quickly without any trouble if I need it.
    "Rock and load, lock and roll... what's it matter? FIRE!!"

    "Gun control means hitting your target every time."

    Please take everything I say with at least one grain of salt- I am a very sarcastic person with a very dry sense of humor.

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    VIP Member Array blitzburgh's Avatar
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    Another plus side to the fanny pack is when somebody looks at you, their first thought will be "who the hell wears those things anymore?"
    "Rebellion against tyrants is obedience to God." - Benjamin Franklin
    "Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn." - C.S. Lewis

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    I have some experience with the topic at hand. That's not to say I'm an expert by any means but at the same time, my advice/critique has some foundation in real world experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by GH View Post
    The problem I see with that is what happens if the person in the wheelchair gets dumped unexpectedly? Now he's separated from his weapon.
    This is a very likely possibility. I would imagine that the first thing that goes through an attacker's mind if he were to attack a person in a wheelchair is to dump him/her. If the attacker can execute this in an expedient manner then he's most likely going to do it because it puts him at an advantage. That's not to say, however, that the chair mounted holster should be abandoned on the "chance" that the person in the chair is going to get dumped. A BUG carried on the person, for example, has the potential to keep a disabled person in the fight.

    I've seen chair mounted holsters before and the biggest concern I have about them has to do with outside/intruder accessibility. In other words, how easy will it be for someone walking by to retrieve the gun from the holster? The pouch disguises it and that's a good thing. When I first watched the guy show how easy it is to remove the pouch from the chair, my first thought is, uh-oh - that looks really easy for a purse snatcher to snag. You're not only out of an expensive gun but now there's a BG with a gun if you were to get snagged! I didn't realize, needless to say, that the holster stays attached to the chair after the pouch is discarded. I would still, however, want to do some testing with this rig though to see how it works with different scenarios.


    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post

    the gun locks in to the holster so it is secure. letís face it someone is in a wheel chair is very limited in the first place so chances are if they are thrown from their chair they are not going to get up and draw their weapon.

    Here is a test; put your gun on and lay down. Without using your legs to upright or rotate yourself tell me how good you do. Make the test fair and make sure you land on your gun side as well as you left or even face down. Yea I know ďat least I will have itĒÖ are you sure... you might lose it getting dumped!
    You make a great example/analogy. I agree that a person in a chair has special challenges. I also agree that special challenges can severely hinder if not completely disable (no pun intended) skill-sets and or motor functions.

    When discussing persons with disabilities, however, we should always keep in mind that functionality/disability will vary from person to person. Persons with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), for example, have varying degrees of balance depending on the level of injury. Lower level paras (T10-L1) are going to have far superior balance than a higher level para (T1-T4). The OP didn't mention his/her disability and out of respect for privacy, I'm not going to ask. I will say, however, that we all need to know or be aware of our limitations. This is no different with persons with disabilities. The OP should make an honest assessment of him/herself and make a decision according to the set-up that will yield the most accommodating solution. Working with an Occupational Therapist (OT) may even be beneficial. Some disabilities can limit muscle elasticity. An OT or Physical Therapist (PT) may even come up with some exercises that can enhance the ability to draw from the holster after a holster solution is selected, etc.

    To go back to your example, some people in this situation are going to be in deep doo and will be helpless/defenseless if they are dumped. Other persons, however, may have the ability to make some recovery. You would think that a guy in a wheel chair wouldn't have great control over his body until you consider this:


    Now I can promise you that most people in wheelchairs can't make this kind of jump but the point is - some can. So long as there's some kind of chance of a person making a recovery after getting dumped, a person should attempt it. It may be difficult but a small chance is better than no chance at all. If you don't try, you don't even have that, etc.

    My points are directed at the thread in general and I used your post as a spring board. Please don't take this as an attack or some sort of reprimand and if it comes off that way then I apologize.


    Quote Originally Posted by RevolvingMag View Post
    Maybe look into a good shoulder harness. I have a cheap nylon rig that ran me about $50 all told- harness and a replacement holster that would fit my 1911- that I mostly use when driving, or would be perfect on a motorcycle.

    A lot of people don't like them because they call them uncomfortable- and it can be- but it's a lot more comfortable knowing that I can get to my gun quickly without any trouble if I need it.
    This is definitely a possibility. OP, keep your options open. As mentioned previously, don't think of these options as an "either or". It's possible to have your EDC holstered onto your chair at the same time you're wearing your BUG in your shoulder holster (or fanny pack).

    I realize that guns are expensive and you may be limited to carrying one gun instead of two. Even when doing this though, you could still carry your EDC in your chair's holster sometimes and wear a shoulder holster at other times - depending on occasions and conditions, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by blitzburgh View Post
    Another plus side to the fanny pack is when somebody looks at you, their first thought will be "who the hell wears those things anymore?"
    I completely agree. Its not uncommon at all to see a person in a wheelchair use a fanny pack. I doubt anyone will think twice about seeing you with one. The only thing that might tip someone off is the brand name. A 5.11 fanny pack, for example, might tip off to someone in the know that you might be carrying a gun. Most people are not going to know what a 5.11 is but someone that is in the gun sub-culture will probably know.

    Please share with us what you decide to go with if its something you care to share. I'm sure it will be helpful to others that are looking for a solution as well.

    God bless,
    DCG
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  11. #11
    Member Array houdini's Avatar
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    dillon had a artical about the holster on the wheel chair

  12. #12
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    this is the holster in use


    DefConGun and staceybrown281 like this.

  13. #13
    New Member Array glockdan1963's Avatar
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    I've been using a chair for 30 years and held a ccw for about 6 years. I have tried just about every method of carry I can think of and have found that a crossbreed in the waistband strong side seems to be the best option for me. I carry a glock 36, and find that it conceals easily even under just a heavy T-shirt. I've tried other IWB holsters and this seems to work the best for me. I'm sure it won't work for everyone, but don't count out the IWB just because you use a chair. I considered many options including chair mount and the fanny pack, but I felt like, for me they were a compromise. My best advise is keep trying until you find something that you are comfortable with and go with it!

  14. #14
    cj
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    It's been a while, but if I'm remembering correctly, the choice the last time this question was asked was a Wilderness Safepacker. There are, of course, a lot of considerations such as a person's size, flexibility, and mobility, but the Safepacker allows a lot of options and attachment or even carrying methods.

  15. #15
    New Member Array staceybrown281's Avatar
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    My uncle is a wheelchair paraplegic. How would he go about getting one if he is just 17 in New York?

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