Gun Control is about to become obsolete.

This is a discussion on Gun Control is about to become obsolete. within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; No thread hijack here but the leftist anti-gunners are going after ammo because ammo ISN'T expressly mentioned in the Constitution. It's simply another legal loophole ...

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Thread: Gun Control is about to become obsolete.

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    No thread hijack here but the leftist anti-gunners are going after ammo because ammo ISN'T expressly mentioned in the Constitution. It's simply another legal loophole the little weasels are trying to accomplish their ultimate goal without drawing undue attention to the scheme. Criminals like the cover of darkness. Mouse-hearts like misdirection.
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    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

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  3. #17
    Ex Member Array bmglock23's Avatar
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    Holy cow, I could carve a gun-looking thing out of a bar of soap and have as much toward a real gun as this 3-D printer gives you. I'm betting against the OP's prediction that gun control will become a moot point anytime soon.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    Remember when all the experts said you would never be able to write, then overwrite, your own CDs?
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  5. #19
    VIP Member Array livewire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmglock23 View Post
    Holy cow, I could carve a gun-looking thing out of a bar of soap and have as much toward a real gun as this 3-D printer gives you. I'm betting against the OP's prediction that gun control will become a moot point anytime soon.
    Remember that this tech is in its infancy. The stuff you can print now wouldn't be strong enough to form the barrel, but give it some time. Just remember, five years ago, people wouldn't believe you if you told them your "phone" was a personal computer and videoconferencing device and that people would be doing HD video editing on them...
    There are four boxes to be used in the defense of liberty: soap - ballot - jury - ammo

    “The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie: deliberate, continued, and dishonest; but the myth: persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic.”
    -- John F. Kennedy

  6. #20
    Member Array Bardo's Avatar
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    "Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons."
    - Popular Mechanics, 1949

    "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers."
    - Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943

    "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home."
    - Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of DEC

    And so it goes...

    Buy stock in 3d printing now.
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  7. #21
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    Array PEF's Avatar
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    I guess this will stop people from complaining about MIM parts...

  8. #22
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    I must be missing something here. To me, this is so far fetched it seems ludicrous. I do not believe ANY "printer" can conjure steel and plastic out of the air(or what ever) and replicate a functioning firearm. Of all the things we need to be worried about, this is way down the list.

  9. #23
    Distinguished Member Array ArkhmAsylm's Avatar
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    I don't see it. The schematics for programming, the computer equipment required, the sheer cost of the printer and the materials needed, not to mention the metallurgical particulars of making a decent firearm all make this a very long shot. IMO, we're talking centuries.

    Quote Originally Posted by oldnfat View Post
    I must be missing something here. To me, this is so far fetched it seems ludicrous. I do not believe ANY "printer" can conjure steel and plastic out of the air(or what ever) and replicate a functioning firearm. Of all the things we need to be worried about, this is way down the list.
    oldnfat: See this Wikipedia article on the subject for a primer.
    "Historical examination of the right to bear arms, from English antecedents to the drafting of the Second Amendment, bears proof that the right to bear arms has consistently been, and should still be, construed as an individual right." -- U.S. District Judge Sam Cummings, Re: U.S. vs Emerson (1999)

  10. #24
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    We had machines at the last place I worked before retiring , that we could scan every part of a gun, and then make it, cut it, etc. ... out of any material you wanted to. A bit expensive to buy for criminals, but easy to do. If you want the exact duplicate of the outside of a BMW, it would do that too. They wanted some tires for a parade float, took the tires off a guy's car.... and soon had exact duplicates cut out... every little detail including the PSI and Size lettering on the side.
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

  11. #25
    Member Array Bardo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnfat View Post
    I must be missing something here. To me, this is so far fetched it seems ludicrous. I do not believe ANY "printer" can conjure steel and plastic out of the air(or what ever) and replicate a functioning firearm. Of all the things we need to be worried about, this is way down the list.

    Quote Originally Posted by ArkhmAsylm View Post
    -
    I don't see it. The schematics for programming, the computer equipment required, the sheer cost of the printer and the materials needed, not to mention the metallurgical particulars of making a decent firearm all make this a very long shot. IMO, we're talking centuries.
    If you don't see it, then you are, sad to say, simply wrong.

    In its simplest form, imagine a zipgun but with a much more refined handle/trigger mechanism attached to it. This can be done today.

    The schematics can be downloaded from Internet for free today. The computer to run it can be bought at Best Buy for under $400.

    The technology available today is not able to do anything amazingly fancy like fashioning an entire firearm from thin air, but it's only a matter of time. Can you print an 1894 Remington today? No. But you can print the lower receiver for A.R. 15. (http://haveblue.org/ & http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygree...print-at-home/)

    This is the future.

  12. #26
    Member Array Bardo's Avatar
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    Please forgive me for indulging in the following story, which may sound like a lot of patting of myself on the back. If it does, I apologize.

    This is actually kind of funny. I have had these discussions pretty much every few years for the past 20 years.

    In 1993 I sat outside of a sign shop with a friend of mine and I told her that I thought that it would be wise to get involved with the Internet, because I thought that businesses would want to get on there and use it to sell products. I remember her distinctly telling me, "Why would they want to do that? I can't think of any reason that any business owner cares about the Internet in anyway."

    She was the manager of the sign shop and she knew more about business and what business owners wanted than I did. So I foolishly listened to her.

    In 2001, I sat with another friend in a coffee shop and I said to him that I thought that Microsoft was on the ropes. That Apple computer had been doing amazing things with the quality of their products and that Microsoft had done nothing but anger their customers for years. I told him that I could see a future when Apple was becoming the dominant platform.

    My friend shook his head, he said, "You don't understand, Microsoft has this machine that they just pull a lever and money spits out (windows and Microsoft office). It would be almost impossible for Apple to unseat them."

    He was a smart guy. He knew a lot about business. I respected his response, but I was just beginning to trust my instincts. I began hedging my bets by learning more about the Apple platform. I'm a professional programmer, so I spent a lot of time learning to program the Mac. I didn't commit fully because I still didn't fully trust my gut. I kept my day job, but I hedged my bets.

    In 2004, I had just watched a TED talk on touchscreen interfaces. I told my coworkers, this is the future of computing, this is where computing is headed. Interfaces that can be manipulated by Multi-Touch. My coworkers were nothing but naysayers.

    They couldn't see past the fact that a multitouch interface doesn't make sense in a desktop computing environment. It only makes sense in other computing environments, such as mobile. I ignored them. By now I knew my instincts were right. I watched the industry carefully waiting for the technology to mature and be used in a product.

    When the iPhone came out in 2007, it's biggest differentiating factor, was it's touchscreen interface. The use of multitouch is what has transformed mobile computing into what it is today on the iPhone and the iPad.

    In 2008 the iPhone SDK was made available to developers like me.

    Because I had been hedging my bets, watching the industry, and learning Macintosh programming, I was able to be one of the first developers who was able to use the it and I begin programming for the iPhone.

    I launched my first iPhone apps on the opening day of the iPhone App Store. After a few days, I called up a business advisor friend of mine and I said to her, "I really think this iPhone thing is going to be big. What advice can you give me for how to maximize the success of my apps?"

    I'll never forget what she said to me. She said: "Don't bother making iPhone apps. No one's going to get rich from the App Store. You should make your current apps free, get a bunch of users, and then figure out how to monetize it later through other services."

    By this point, I had really come to trust my instincts. I felt in my heart that she was wrong and I ignored her advice.

    Six months later I was making enough money from my apps on the iPhone that I was able to quit my day job. I've been successfully writing iOS apps full-time ever since.

    Anyway, make a long story short: You can choose not to believe me. You can make fun of this all you want. You can doubt the technology, you can doubt whether the technology will advance to the point that I say it will. But I'm telling you right now, that 3-D printing technology is at the exact same stage computers were when the homebrew computer club was active and Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak formed Apple Computer. I personally know of people involved in technology who are building their own 3-D printers today and using them to fabricate all kinds of interesting things. Some of the smartest people that I know are using this technology today and are learning about it. People who have the brains and the resources to turn 3-D printing technology into the next personal computer revolution.

    Will it always be the same rickety, wooden, noisy, plastic extruding technology that it is today? Probably not. But within 20 to 30 years every house will have some form of technology derived from the 3-D printing technology that we are developing today. And those who are resourceful enough, and determined enough, will be able to use that technology to fabricate almost anything out of almost any kind of material.

    Wow, this was a real novel. I apologize again for being so long-winded.

    Interestingly enough, I'm posting this by using my voice to dictate to my iPad, while I lay on my couch, accessing this bulletin board over a high-speed Internet connection funded primarily by eCommerce. There's no wires connected to my iPad. It's all happening in the air. And all of that, 20 years ago, would have seemed like magic.

  13. #27
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    Does anyone know where I can get 3D schematics for a concealed carry badge?
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  14. #28
    Member Array beararms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardo View Post
    Buy stock in 3d printing now.
    Which companies are heavily involved in 3d printing?

  15. #29
    Ex Member Array FireStar M40's Avatar
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    You Can't Be Saying That...

    Quote Originally Posted by ghost tracker View Post
    Crime seems more a function of "being criminal" than having access to the technology of tools.
    Whoa now. Ya'll can't be saying that. Ya need to put your "common sense" and "good thinking" away before some folks thinks you're too smart for your own good.

    Geez.. you mean to tell me I've had this wrong all these years? And here I thought "Criminals" were the way they are not because of who they are.. but rather what they are. Who'da thunk..!!..?

    FireStar M40

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array SFury's Avatar
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    If anyone thinks you can't make a working gun with some of the current 3D printers, you are dreaming.

    Sure, they are not the heavy duty guns that you can put hundreds of rounds through. They will fire a round, maybe two. The biggest issue comes with parts that have a lot of tension put on them. Springs most notably for guns.

    Being able to make a short use firearm is possible today. Making a gun of the same quality of a manufactured one, not so close.

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