Drawing from a vehicle, ie: seated position? - Page 2

Drawing from a vehicle, ie: seated position?

This is a discussion on Drawing from a vehicle, ie: seated position? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Honestly, yourfirst priority should be getting out of your seat belt. If your firing from your car its likely that you are going to be ...

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Thread: Drawing from a vehicle, ie: seated position?

  1. #16
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    Honestly, yourfirst priority should be getting out of your seat belt. If your firing from your car its likely that you are going to be either egressing or at least moving in your car more than your seatbelt will allow for. It may just be my personal opinion but I really think getting out of the seatbelt is the priority. That also makes of much easier to get to your gun no matter how you carry.lt gives you the freedom to move and not get your gun caught up in the seat belt.

    We shot out of vehicles while at partner tactics at TDI. Yes, it was loud, but not much louder than shooting in a room. What was weirder was the brass getting everywhere and the feeling that you were going to blow a hole in your car. We practiced shooting our way out of the car and to cover while communicating with each other. lt's a lot of fun, actually.

    when it comes to carry in the winter l leave my gun where it is and just open my coat for easier access. When I get the seatbelt out of the way the coat Is no longer an issue.


  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post


    DeSantis Kingston holster.
    That's pretty nice, wouldn't be a bad solution for when I'm just in the car. Nice car btw, I used to have an 07 STi with a rotated 3076r from P&L. Never got to install it, plans changed decided a house was more important, sold the car and parts and bought a used 03 Audi instead. Nice and paid off, but I miss the speeed haha.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    Honestly, yourfirst priority should be getting out of your seat belt. If your firing from your car its likely that you are going to be either egressing or at least moving in your car more than your seatbelt will allow for. It may just be my personal opinion but I really think getting out of the seatbelt is the priority. That also makes of much easier to get to your gun no matter how you carry.lt gives you the freedom to move and not get your gun caught up in the seat belt.

    We shot out of vehicles while at partner tactics at TDI. Yes, it was loud, but not much louder than shooting in a room. What was weirder was the brass getting everywhere and the feeling that you were going to blow a hole in your car. We practiced shooting our way out of the car and to cover while communicating with each other. lt's a lot of fun, actually.

    when it comes to carry in the winter l leave my gun where it is and just open my coat for easier access. When I get the seatbelt out of the way the coat Is no longer an issue.

    That seems like sound advice - but when if you don't see the BG coming until they are fairly close? I guess one could argue if they are that close it's too late to draw anyways, but I'm just thinking I may not have time to unbuckle and try to get out of the car. Unbuckling quick and drawing is worth drilling on though.

    Alaska + Winter = big, thick coats. Mine is a damn nice coat and very thin for it's protection, but even then it's still a fairly big jacket and even unzipped it is still pretty much in the way.

  4. #19
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    Drawing from a vehicle, ie: seated position?

    I have a "Driving" holster for a 2" J frame. Sits on left side of waist, butt forward. Attached to belt by a Velcro strap that goes under the belt and surrounds holster. Works fine.

  5. #20
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    Lima, IOW, in any car scenario, your first step is to move out of the driver's seat? If you're blind-sided by an armed carjacker who is high on meth and lowering his weapon? I have carried the FIST cross-draw-to-driving holster (their number, 42). As I scan for threats, I feel much more secure when I can access my weapon and release my belt at the same time, if necessary. If it's good enough for TDI, then, with some personal interpretation, it's probably good enough for me. It's also good that you prioritize the car instead of the weapon for evasion and escape before countering - according to the wisdom and legality of moving up the force continuum. So I'm asking for clarification.
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  6. #21
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    No, I didn't say that getting out of the driver's seat was the first priority. I said that getting out of the SEATBELT was the priority. You can certainly stay in the driver's seat if that's the best place to be but should you have to move suddenly you are juggling a gun and a seat belt. Or if you are taking fire and need to take as much cover as you can by getting as small in your seat as possible you won't be able to do that easily with a seatbelt on,

    I like to think of it as the equivalent of getting off the ×. Yes, sometimes you have to fight from the × but if at all possible you should try to move. If you are belted in that makes it almost impossible.

    Remember, you never rise to the occasion. Rather, you fall to the level of training. I can picture someone getting out their gun, realising they need to move, reaching with their gun in hand to the seatbelt release (as most people are right-handed) and squeezing off a round, hopefully not into their leg. It just seems smarter to practise getting that restraint off as soon as possible and before you have a gun in hand.

    Yeah, if someone is already bearing down on you with a firearm drawn you are just in a bad situation. But you are also in a car-a very large projectile. There are options depending on whether the car is running, etc. That's why it's always a good idea to have other safe vehicle practices like starting the car and putting it in gear, even if you are sitting there for a moment or two. Making sure you have plenty of room to drive around the person in front of you. Keeping your doors locked and windows mostly rolled up, things like that. In which case,if you saw someone bearing down on you with a gun drawn your options are not limited to a gun.

    As for me? I'm getting out of that belt so I can move if I have to and not worry about juggling too much.

  7. #22
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    Lima's advice is sound (as always). You have some other options too. If you are wearing bulky heavy clothes, can you carry in a holster that fits a bit looser and still conceal? If so, can you physically tuck your shirt/coat behind the gun while seated in the car? If yes, check if this is legal in your state before doing it. This used to be required in OH before the legislature changed the law, it was called the Buckeye Tuck as the gun had to be visible while in a car. You had to remember to untuck when getting out of the car, but you could more easily access the weapon while seated.

    Also assess where you are in your car/truck and what your escape options are, both in the car and out of it. If at all possible, don't get boxed in, leave plenty of room in front so that you can move around the car in front if needed. If the MWAG has blood in his eyes and he is drawing down on you, don't worry about the paint job on your car or those around you. You would be amazed how much most vehicles can move those around them if you are willing to play bumper cars. Don't forget to make noise with the horn. If it does not dissuade the BG, others will at least be witness to what you do and why you are doing it. If you run a dash cam/voice recorder, talk to it - tell it what is going on that it cannot see. If you have time, describe the perp and his vehicle to your dash cam/voice recorder. Be careful not to give it anything you would not want to tell a cop directly.

    If I am going for a long trip, I either use a High Noon Under Taker shoulder rig or a FIST driving holster that rotates from cross draw to basically pointing at the driver's door. But let's face it, most of our driving is not on long trips. Usually it is just part of our daily activity, running to the store for something or going to work, church or whatever. Also, most of our time in the car when we could reasonable expect an attack (not just poor driving) is not droning down the interstate, but on side streets and in parking lots. Therefore, practicing enhanced defensive driving skills (not just what they taught you in basic driving school when you were 16, but all the other things you can do to maintain an advantage, plot an escape route and knowing the capabilities of the vehicle you are driving*, as well as knowing who is following you at all times) is just as important, possibly more so, than just being able to get to your weapon.

    * - a Jeep can go over more curbs/obstacles than a Porsche 911, a Smart car can make 3 lanes out of 2 more often than a F-150, a 4WD can go through terrain that a 2WD can't, etc. You get the idea.
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by whoppo View Post
    When I climb into the truck I move my pistol, in its Remora holster, to my 11:00 position (cross-draw)... Still IWB, but with the grip exposed.
    The seat belt does not interfere with drawing the weapon and when it comes out of the holster it's positioned well for defense against a driver side threat.

    When I hop out of the truck I easily move it back to an AIWB position and drape my un-tucked shirt over it for concealment.
    I used this reply because this solves a problem in many states and probably does not apply in AK's Alaska. In SC, you cannot just find a nice location in your car and be ready--it is against the law. The firearm must be on you as your CCW or in a locked glove or side compartment. Wherever you live, do not just follow this forum's advice and know specifically what your state has to say about vehicle carry--if it is illegal in SC to just have the firearm easily accessible hanging from something, it is probably illegal in many states. I do what whoopo does with my Remora holster. I am still CC but the firearm, when I am in the car, is easily accessible, since it is not "tied" to a belt or a clip--it is designed to be worn with pants that do not have any belt and it can be moved, if desired; it has a very sticky sort of covering that, together with a good fit at the waist via the button or velcro or string, stays where it has been placed but can be moved with a bit of effort once you are in car.

  9. #24
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    Basically: Is there any tips or tricks that you've learned over the years to help facilitate a faster response in an emergency?
    The variables involved in this question are almost endless. Type, color and size of weapon etc...
    What works well for me may not work for everyone. Do what works for YOU.

    Emergencies? Such as?
    I submit, if one feels they are unprepared in their auto they are either 1) Not thinking or 2) are unable to recognize a emergency.

    (i.e) if a bad guy is walking up to me while I am in my car in a parking lot 1) I see him coming because situational awareness is quite important when carrying and 2) I WILL have my gun in hand...NOT in it's holster.

    Here's a couple pics of MY simple solution when I am driving. It works perfectly for me, conceals well because my seats are black and so is my gun. It is well concealed because of the color match and size of the gun; but nott so concealed I can't get to it rapidly.gun.jpggun1.jpg
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  10. #25
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    I shove mine next to the right side of my seat between the seat & console. It fits nice & snug but draws easily. All that shows is the grip & is completely invisible from the outside when I'm seated.
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GH View Post
    I shove mine next to the right side of my seat between the seat & console. It fits nice & snug but draws easily. All that shows is the grip & is completely invisible from the outside when I'm seated.
    Not the best idea if you're in an accident. That gun could end up anywhere. However, there is a simple solution that can aid in preventing that scenario.
    GLOCKTECH INDUSTRIES - Home of the Original MIC Holster since 1997 or
    *Multi Holsters ~ Quality Custom KYDEX Gun Holsters for Inside, Outside, Multi 2-in-1 Inside/Outside Waistband, Pocket & Mag Holders both make these.

    here's a video of the TC or MIC holster used in a car.
    MRCOLIONNOIR's Car Concealed Carry Method (Revised) - YouTube

  12. #27
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    I hope that if I am in my car my first option can be to drive. Either away from the threat or over it (if I have to). If I cannot drive off I will want to exit my vehicle, if possible (cars are giant bullet magnets) to return fire or escape.

    I would really hate to be stuck in my cars front seat while engaged in a firefight. So I would follow Lima's (very good) advice and unbuckle my seat belt.

    If I am carrying IWB than I can draw while seating in the drivers seat, when Pocket carrying I wedge the pistol between driver seat and console while I am driving my car.
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  13. #28
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    I don't know about other state's laws, but in South Carolina, most of the ideas described above would be illegal. In SC, if carrying concealed (i.e. with a CWP), the weapon must be "on your person" or in a purse or briefcase. If not carrying pursuant to a CWP, it must be in a closed (not necessarily locked) console or glove compartment. Thus, no seat holsters, under dash holsters, between the seats, etc. are allowed.

    For myself, I carry appendix anyway, so this is the best compromise for accessibility.

    Best answer is try not to get into a situation where you need to draw while seated in the car in the first place.
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  14. #29
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    I have a dash "cubby" that my P238 fits into perfectly with the grip strong side.
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  15. #30
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    As another said, the first option should always be drive away. OR if you can't drive away but you can use your vehicle that is a more likely to stop a threat than a handgun.

    Personally any time I get into a car I switch to open carry. When I add a coat into the equation similar to others it is open and I tuck it behind me slightly. Based on where you keep your gun one option you will have is to lean slightly forward and to the left to get clean access.

    Regarding when to take the seat belt off for me it just depends on the situation. I know some here were taught and prefer to take the seat belt off first. Some big name instructors recommend getting your gun into the fight first such as Gabe Suarez. Personally if the threat is on top of me I know I need to do some hands on work first so I'd want my seat belt off ASAP. If I have distance between us and I have a little time to draw I would bring my gun into the fight first. While I am generally a KISS type student I think there are to many variables to say one way is better than the other.

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