Stopping power or the gun I can shoot best? - Page 3

Stopping power or the gun I can shoot best?

This is a discussion on Stopping power or the gun I can shoot best? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; If you like the SP101, then it may well be your best bet. I own 3.06" and 2.25" versions, and find the longer version to ...

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Thread: Stopping power or the gun I can shoot best?

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Rexster's Avatar
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    If you like the SP101, then it may well be your best bet. I own 3.06" and 2.25" versions, and find the longer version to recoil somewhat less, and also have somewhat better practical accuracy. I think part of the better practical accuracy is due to the balance point being a bit more toward the muzzle, which help the shooter "feel" where it is pointing.

    There is nothing at all wrong with preferring revolvers! I started handgunning with 1911 autos, have owned and carried many autos, and still love the 1911, but I really do prefer a revolver for a high-stress draw-and-shoot-quick situation. While I can potentially shoot an auto as well as anything, revolvers seem more stress-proof in my hands.

    I recommend Grant Cunningham's book on the subject of revolvers; it is available as an e-book in several formats, as well as the paperback version.


  2. #32
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    I have both a 642 and 640. When I first got the 642, I hated it. It beat my hands up. I put Hogue rubber boot grips on it and it became a joy to shoot 200 rounds at a time. The grips added about 1/2 inch to the height, but cover the backstrap and greatly reduce felt recoil.

    The 640, which is steel, feels almost like a .22 with .38 spcl rounds, but is a lot heavier for carry. If I am pocket carrying, I go with the 642. For belt carry I go with the 640 with .357 SD rounds.
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  3. #33
    Distinguished Member Array grouse's Avatar
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    I'd go with a 3" barrel & a steel frame & then practice, practice, practice.

  4. #34
    Distinguished Member Array Stetson's Avatar
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    I practice with one of my 22lr.I bought a hot banger 38 spl that's designed to take+P'S ammo the model is bodyguard.When you have carry handguns you want them small and light revolver.I bought my bodguard in 38spl,it comes with a laser site;why? and 5 shot bulldog style revolver.One thing I tell people who have the fancy sites and light in a combat situation I'll shot at your lights! I have a charter House Bulldog in 44spl that has a mild recoil because it came with soft rubber grips.
    I tell you if your ever in a shoot the guns bite will be the last thing you'll noticed.

  5. #35
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex3737 View Post
    Kelcarry, Thanks for that suggestion. I like the FN5.7X28, but I'm looking to stay with a revolver. I prefer a revolver for high stress self defense. I know not everyone agrees with that, just my personal preference.
    I actually agree with you. If there was a 5.7 revolver that had the low recoil, I would have purchased it. I like revolvers because all you do is pull the trigger and it goes bang. With a semi ya just never know, although, in practice with many rounds, I have never had any kind of misfire or problem with my 5.7.

  6. #36
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    Stick with the 38 spl, but install a new set of Hogue or Pachmayr grips for under $50. Then practice until you can make consistent hits inside the thoracic triangle at 7-10 yards. Remember...this is not bullseye marksmanship...it's about stopping a potentially lethal attack and surviving to return home to your family and loved ones.
    [T]he unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people. ---Tenche Coxe, The Pennsylvania Gazette, Feb. 20, 1788.

  7. #37
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLMOPE View Post
    It sounds like you need to hit a range that rents guns.
    You need to find something you can shoot but still has enough stopping power to do the job.

    Keep an open mind and find what works for you.
    Yep! Proper practice will help him get accustom to handling recoil. But, It also sounds like he needs to get some REAL instruction.

    OP-
    A little 38 can be snappy. But, (barring some health limitations), a good instructor should be able to help you improve your technique so you can handle recoil better. I have arthritic hands and wrists. But, finding & practicing the correct grip & techniques allows me to handle anything I shoot more comfortably.

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    Last edited by tcox4freedom; December 20th, 2012 at 11:48 AM.

  8. #38
    Distinguished Member Array Rexster's Avatar
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    Be sure to grasp a snubby HIGH on the grip frame. This directs recoil into the palm of the hand, rather than the web of the hand. Most inexperienced revolver shooters that I have seen hold too low on the grip. Holding low effectively raises the bore axis, which gives the recoiling gun more leverage against the hand. If this is couple with a loose hold, the gun gets a running start before slamming into the web of the hand.

  9. #39
    Ex Member Array Stan6406's Avatar
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    I would say if a smaller caliber is all you can accurately shoot then that's what you need. I'd rather get grazed with a 45 then take 6-10 shots to the chest with a 22. My father in law has troubles shooting larger guns and after taking him to the range a few time and shooting a 22. 38, 380. 9mm and 40 He ended up with the 22. He can hit consistently with it.
    MASSIVE likes this.

  10. #40
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    I have four wheel guns to choose from, and my favorite would be the 637 in 38 Cal +p from S & W. It disapperars on my long body.
    My wife likes the smaller version 351PD in 22 Win Mag.
    Since we both have arthritis in hands, and other places in our bodies, the decisions were made with control issues
    accuracy, and comfort all in the mix.
    I have a GP100 in 357 3 inch, and will carry it on the occasions where I can hide it well.
    Getting old (over 65) sucks, but knowing if the occasion arises where we need a firearm, we have what we know we can control,
    Here's hoping that everyone has a happy holiday season. Grandpagus from Oregon.

  11. #41
    Senior Member Array wjh2657's Avatar
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    I also carry a 642 (pocket) or a 640 (IWB). I pick different ammo for each, .38 Spl Std for the 642 and .38 Spl +P for the 640. 7=10 yards is reaching for a snubby. Yes, it can hit at that range but only if you really take your time and expend lots of concentrated effort. Both of which you will never have in a real SD situation. I fire at 10, 15 and 21 feet. Realistically, if you use your head you can avoid most gunfights. It is the surprise attack that will make you use your gun and you will be darn lucky if you have 21 feet between you and the BG by the time you get your gun out. 7-10 feet seems to be the most encountered SD distances in real shootouts. (Most LEOs are killed within the 10 feet envelope!) I also practice with a 317 in .22 almost every day. Doing this saves me ammo at my weekly range shoot with carry guns as I am on target immediately and my trigger work is vastly improved. All three revolvers have the same grip, the S&W "Banana" grip, which I have found to be best for me.

    I find most people who are "down" on snubbies are shooting them outside of the real SD environment. The IPSC 3 BG's and the woman hostage scenarios are not duplicating what most of us are really having to prepare for. If you have the "hero/Rambo" complex where you are going to wipe out the gangs and terrorists all by yourself and have all the foxy blondes throwing themselves at you, then you need a bigger, more "tricked out" high capacity semi-auto. I don't say this loosely or just for sarcasm. Almost all LEO/BG encounters by a single LEO and multiple BGs ends up with a young woman holding a flag and listening to "Amazing Grace" as they bury her policeman husband.

    If your real problem is getting mugged at the ATR or WALMART parking lot (the real problem for most of us) a smaller 9MM single stack auto or a good snubby will keep you alive. I would not go below the .38 Spl or 9MM for SD however. Get a grip and ammo mix that you can comfortably handle and then practice a whole lot.
    Retired Marine, Retired School Teacher, Independent voter, Goldwater Conservative.

  12. #42
    Member Array JasoninSD's Avatar
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    As mentioned previously, you might look at a larger set of grips for the .38. I just use the standard boot grips on my S&W 638 so I am not able to offer any first hand experience on larger grips but there should be some good options out there for you. If that does not help, the .22 would certainly be more effective than strong words.

  13. #43
    Member Array gooseman1991's Avatar
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    Just something to think about, the snub nose .22's that Smith makes are 9 shot. Get a few more shots, ammo is cheap, sacrifice a little stopping power. For defense I would prefer a revolver 22 rather than auto 22 if you have the choice. It's on my wish list lol.

    Goose

    Edit: Also I am hearing impaired and ring easily so I prefer something a little quieter.
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  14. #44
    Member Array tony1990's Avatar
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    A good quality 380 using Remington 88 Gr Hollow point bullets should give you the protection you can handle. Do try to get one that you can try out before you buy since you may not like the feel of the 380.

  15. #45
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex3737 View Post
    I've been concealed carrying a S&W 642 .38 special revolver for about a year now. I love the size of the gun and I like the idea of its stopping power, however the recoil in such a light weight gun is to much for me. I can't shoot it well, and therefore don't feel confident with it.

    I know most people don't like the .22 caliber for self defense, but I really like shooting a .22 revolver and can afford to do it. I'm thinking about getting rid of my 642 and getting a S&W 43c or Ruger LCR 22.

    Is it better to stick with stopping power, even though I can't shoot it well, or should I go with a gun I can shoot confidently comfortably? Is a .22 I can shoot well, better than a .38 that I can't shoot well?

    Any thoughts?
    You won't like my thoughts, but here they are:
    don't use a .22 or .38sp for personal protection. Both are very weak rounds.
    Try a .380ACP or 9x19mm Luger in a gun like the Px4 Storm that has a design specifically designed to reduce felt recoil and make the gun feel softer.
    You really want a round that can penetrate layered clothing, or shatter a pelvis if you aim for the hips to stop a charging attacker in one shot. (no pelvic bone means the legs can't mechanically function. they can't run without working legs, and if they have body armor on, the pelvis is a slower moving, bigger target than the head)

    Try the Px4 at a rental range and see what you think. It's easy to shoot, easy to conceal, nice looking, pretty cheap for ammo, and has stopping power. best of all conditions combined.

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