Employer policy what would you do

This is a discussion on Employer policy what would you do within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; You might want to ask management what steps they have taken to ensure the safety of their employees from an armed intruder. Also, perhaps asking ...

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  1. #16
    Member Array Richekay's Avatar
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    You might want to ask management what steps they have taken to ensure the safety of their employees from an armed intruder. Also, perhaps asking about insurance coverage for wrongful deaths that they might be responsible for. Have them start thinking about external threats.

    OTOH, like the others have said, check with an attorney and make sure you are in compliance, don't say or show anything and enjoy your job.

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  3. #17
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitBri View Post
    What my plan is to openly bring it up to my direct manager that I don't feel his boss's understanding of our very large national company's policy is incorrect due to the policy wording and request he dig deeper. My other thought was to go to the HR dept with is out of state and ask their opinion of the policy. Might do both. Will obey by what they say just don't like someone making an opinion to something that the company appears to support from their wording
    You SURE you want to identify yourself as a gun nut? Some other issue just might be found soon, for which you may find yourself escorted to the door.
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  4. #18
    Member Array daffyduc's Avatar
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    Getting an upfront informed answer in writing from hr is the way to go. Sounds to me like they allow carry with permit.

  5. #19
    Ex Member Array pscipio03's Avatar
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    Unless you plan on showing the thing off to your buddies at work, how will they know you have one in your car? My work has the same policy-- I simply park in the street instead of the parking lot.
    I would question the denial of weapons in your POV if being used for work purposes. They can make a rule against you bringing a weapon onto company grounds-- fair deal. However, extending that to your car when not on property seems sketchy to me.

  6. #20
    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitBri View Post
    What my plan is to openly bring it up to my direct manager that I don't feel his boss's understanding of our very large national company's policy is incorrect due to the policy wording and request he dig deeper. My other thought was to go to the HR dept with is out of state and ask their opinion of the policy. Might do both. Will obey by what they say just don't like someone making an opinion to something that the company appears to support from their wording
    I'm not sure I understand you completely but I believe you are saying that the policy isn't clear in that it leaves room for interpretation. I'm betting that if your questions get enough attention the policy will be re-worded in a manner that will leave no doubt as to its intent.

  7. #21
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    Fortunately, except under very limited circumstances, FL has enacted a "parking lot" law to protect gun owners from cases just like this. While "except as allowed by law" may cover you legally (not saying either way knowing nothing about Iowa law), if a company wants you gone, they will find grounds to do so.

    To approach supervisors or HR may certainly put you in the spotlight. You may find that, yes, you are authorized by law--with a cc permit--to carry at work. Or you may find company policy quickly changed to delete the "except as authorized by law" clause.
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  8. #22
    New Member Array WhitBri's Avatar
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    Employer policy what would you do

    What I am saying is the policy states one thing and one manager stated different. I believe he is wrong as why would they add "except as allowed by law" to the policy if they did not want me to carry with permit. They would just leave that out and state no employee is allowed to have a weapon. Think I will call hr without giving my name and get an answer
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  9. #23
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    I cannot believe I am about to type this, but I agree with everything Yeager said in the video linked earlier.
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  10. #24
    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitBri View Post
    What my plan is to openly bring it up to my direct manager that I don't feel his boss's understanding of our very large national company's policy is incorrect due to the policy wording and request he dig deeper. My other thought was to go to the HR dept with is out of state and ask their opinion of the policy. ...
    Rant on!

    Speaking with your direct supervisor and perhaps that person's supervisor is probably not a bad idea, depending on your relationship with those people, But DO NOT GO TO HR. They are not your friend. They are in place to insure that company rules are observed. HR is a department that only exists to insure the company does not run afoul of government regulations. While I realize this is a jaded view of HR, I have always found it better to run issues past people who are superior to HR, that way the directions come down to them, rather than allowing HR to develop more policy that will, in their opinion, protect the company better. I have never seen an HR department take a stand favorable to an employee against the wishes of senior management.

    Rant off!
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    Quote Originally Posted by high pockets View Post
    Rant on!

    Speaking with your direct supervisor and perhaps that person's supervisor is probably not a bad idea, depending on your relationship with those people, But DO NOT GO TO HR. They are not your friend. They are in place to insure that company rules are observed. HR is a department that only exists to insure the company does not run afoul of government regulations. While I realize this is a jaded view of HR, I have always found it better to run issues past people who are superior to HR, that way the directions come down to them, rather than allowing HR to develop more policy that will, in their opinion, protect the company better. I have never seen an HR department take a stand favorable to an employee against the wishes of senior management.

    Rant off!
    I tend to agree. HRs are there to protect the Co.
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  12. #26
    Member Array BamaAlum97's Avatar
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    Employer policy what would you do

    If it's a job you like, do your best to comply with company policy...if you get caught you'll be fired...even if you get reinstated due to the "except allowed by law" clause, you'll eventually be fired for something else.

    In my job, I am regularly on-site at and inside schools...so carrying at work or even in my car is not really an option.

  13. #27
    Member Array TVille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitBri View Post
    What my plan is to openly bring it up to my direct manager that I don't feel his boss's understanding of our very large national company's policy is incorrect due to the policy wording and request he dig deeper. My other thought was to go to the HR dept with is out of state and ask their opinion of the policy. Might do both. Will obey by what they say just don't like someone making an opinion to something that the company appears to support from their wording
    As an individual, this will just bring attention to you. No doubt your boss is a busy (enough) guy - why should he care to make waves for you? Even if you are the best employee he has, he would probably much prefer you just be quiet and not make waves. From my experience, HR types don't have much sense of humor, and tend to be by the book type of folks. If the policy is no weapons, they probably won't care that you have a permit.

    Basically, what everyone else has said is correct. Make your own decision and recognize the potential consequences of that decision.

  14. #28
    Senior Member Array Lish's Avatar
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    Employer policy what would you do

    My work is one that no weapons are allowed - even in personal cars in the parking lot. Makes me nuts and even though FL is very explicit that employees can carry in their cars on company property I believe my work falls under the exemptions listed. So I abide by company policy, even though it makes me crazy, and leave my gun at home in the safe. I don't like it, but I do like my job and don't want to find another one, so I play by the rules.
    guitarzNgunz likes this.

  15. #29
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    It sounds as if you're trying to find a loophole by looking for discrepancies in the "wording". If you get caught, you're not going to win this battle because you are violating the spirit of the law. The very fact that you're trying to find a way around it is proof enough. You may not go to jail (depending on what your local laws are, etc.) but you can be legally fired for violating company policy. This can then hinder you from finding employment elsewhere.

    If you don't like the policy then find employment somewhere else. In the mean time, you may want to develop skills that can be deployed as defensive measures. The mind is the ultimate weapon and although they can limit you in what you can carry, they can never limit your mindset. The best way to stay out of harm's way is to use de-escalation strategies, self-awareness and making good decisions on how to travel so you don't unnecessarily put yourself in harm's way. Most people do not consider a pen to be a "weapon" per-se but with proper training, you can get something like a Benchmade pen and defend yourself and not violate company policy at the same time.

    Best of hope with whatever you decide to do with your situation.
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  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by high pockets View Post
    Rant on!

    Speaking with your direct supervisor and perhaps that person's supervisor is probably not a bad idea, depending on your relationship with those people, But DO NOT GO TO HR. They are not your friend. They are in place to insure that company rules are observed. HR is a department that only exists to insure the company does not run afoul of government regulations. While I realize this is a jaded view of HR, I have always found it better to run issues past people who are superior to HR, that way the directions come down to them, rather than allowing HR to develop more policy that will, in their opinion, protect the company better. I have never seen an HR department take a stand favorable to an employee against the wishes of senior management.

    Rant off!
    Hey! I resemble that remark! I have been in HR for almost 30 years now. I can tell the OP that the intent of that policy is to prevent anyone from carrying at work ("except as permitted by law' - means police officers).

    Why do businesses have these rules? One reason is insurance. I know no carrier would give us liability insurance if we allowed even valid permit holders to carry. And since most insurances are bundled, we would be unable to get any property, fire, or possibly workers comp coverage.

    Also, who is going to check every day to see who is carrying? and if they are legally permitted? And just like not all licensed drivers are good drivers, who is to say that every CC'er is a 'good guy"? Or at least not a good guy having a bad day? It's one thing to take personal responsibility for self defense, it's another thing for a company to take legal responsibility for others to do the same. Not much upside, a lot ot potential downside. Good discussion, however...
    Honor is self-esteem made visible in action. - Ayn Rand

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