NEW Carriers - A Little Nervous???? - Page 3

NEW Carriers - A Little Nervous????

This is a discussion on NEW Carriers - A Little Nervous???? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I know I was nervous. My previous handgun experience was only military. Family lived in NY so handguns were a no no. Other firearms I ...

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Thread: NEW Carriers - A Little Nervous????

  1. #31
    Member Array uberrogue's Avatar
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    I know I was nervous. My previous handgun experience was only military. Family lived in NY so handguns were a no no. Other firearms I owned and operated since I was a kid... anyways got my CC May of 2012. Didnt really carry the firearm sat in the safe except when I went to the range which was about once every two weeks or so. There were a few things that affected... one was my nervousnous... second was the wifes nervousness. I am a sknny guy and I found it rather difficult to hide a SR9C with the extended mag. Wife wasnt nervous about the actual carrying rather the bulges in various place on my person meaning it wasnt concealed very well. Early Christmas present was a ccw jacket with a pocket for the firearm...

    I "broke" it in by carrying it with her on a shopping trip wo wally world. Wasnt chambered because of my nervousness... in my mind I was imagining the firing pin just popping and having it disharge. Talking with a LEO friend of mine he explained that his dept carries glocks and the only safety is the finger. They have never had a discharge. Then he put it in perpective of fending someonemoff with one hand and drawing with the other... or how fast people can close distance and when you need it loaded I could regret not having one chambered. So I wore it chambered in the house one day and eventually started doing it off and on... was looking for others opinions on carrying chambered and found this forum and many posts on it.. I carry chambered now. Like what they said after doing it repeatedly the nervousness goes away and dont play with it or fidget. Just leave it alone and trust yourself and your gear and if you ever need it you know where it is.
    Last edited by uberrogue; January 13th, 2013 at 12:27 PM. Reason: fat fingers


  2. #32
    Member Array JayHawker45's Avatar
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    A little nervous is a good thing, it helps keep you from becoming complacent. Complacency is what gets many of us in trouble. I've got several friends that were overly nervous starting out carrying, some to the point that they would not carry with a round in the chamber. Getting them to carry around the house for a period of time helped quite a bit in alleviating their hesitance in carrying with a round in the chamber. The other item I tell them is take a reputable tactical pistol course! Just because you can carry, doesn't mean that you know what the hell you're doing, get qualified and proficient in the use of the firearm. Confidence levels go up mathmetically when they've gone through a pistol course and they know how to REALLY run their firearm and keep it running should they ever have to use it. It's more than just showing up at a range and going through the "usual square range routine" and calling it training.

    I guess that's why I enjoy working with female students much more than male. This is a generalization I know, but it seems women tend to listen more and better and focus on what you tell them, they tend to become better shots faster than men do. My experience with male students is that you have to first "unlearn" a few bad habits and deal with the mentality that because we are male, we are genetically programmed to be the next Vasili Zaitsev or something.
    Rattlehead likes this.
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  3. #33
    VIP Member Array smolck's Avatar
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    It took me a week to feel relatively comfortable carrying a fully loaded weapon. Proper holster and belt are the most important things to help you feel safe and comfy. As long as your weapon has a holster with a covered trigger and a solid belt, modern firearms will NEVER just "go off". You need to trust in that.
    As Benjamin Franklin left the hall in Philadelphia, he was asked, “What kind of government have you given us, Dr. Franklin?” He replied: “A republic, if you can keep it.”

  4. #34
    Ex Member Array hartlathers's Avatar
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    You should be concerned. The first day I carried, I was sick to my stomach. I carried an LCP with one round in the mag and not even chambered. I've gotten over the fear, but the responsibilty of carrying a deadly weapon is ever present. Now I carry a CZ fully loaded with 17 rounds of 9mm.

    I have taken a few self defense/cc classes. I had an instructor say something very interesting, and it's something I keep in mind when I am armed in public. He said "don't do anything with a gun you wouldn't do without one".

  5. #35
    Member Array Spovik's Avatar
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    I'm one of the greener members to the CC world, and it was a little awkward. I'm still over fixated with cover and silhouette but I'm getting better. The right holster and clips on my holster made a big difference as well as positioning.

    Thankfully, my state (currently) allows open carry so in the worst case scenario, if it does flash, then I don't have to worry about legal consequences. Look back now and then, I'm way more comfortable carrying now, but I never want to get so comfortable that I lose respect for the potential consequences.

  6. #36
    Member Array violinjim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotGuns View Post
    Hey...if it makes you nervous...


    After you carry awhile and get used to it, it'll make you nervous when you're NOT carrying it...
    Yup. After more than 10 years, this is how I feel. I started with Revolvers and carried a .38 for many years. Definitely a good holster and belt is a must.

  7. #37
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    I was not nervous when I first carried but it took 2 weeks before I carried with one in the pipe. I am an old military fart and just the other day I had a Doc appointment and had to leave it in the car. I felt a bit naked then discovered I left home without my wallet. The combo of the 2 drove me nuts. ( I don't go anywhere without my ID etc, and I wear a belt so my pants are not below my butt )
    I did note the other day I drive a bit slower ( speed limit ) and don't push yellow lights anymore, avoiding a traffic stop.
    As a test for printing etc, I did a wally walk and a few other places with a 357 mag revolver, a 9mm and a 380 all at the same time. Nothing printed and no one knew. Let me tell you, with all that and reloads, it was a bit of weight. I might lose a few lbs if I wore it all the time and walked around.
    You get over the nervous but should never get over the feeling of responsibility.
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  8. #38
    Senior Member Array GreyGhost's Avatar
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    Like most have said, at first it's a nervous excitement. After a while it becomes a natural part of you. At a subconscious level you know it's there but it doesn't intrude as much into your daily habits.
    Question Everything!

  9. #39
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayHawker45 View Post
    A little nervous is a good thing, it helps keep you from becoming complacent. Complacency is what gets many of us in trouble. I've got several friends that were overly nervous starting out carrying, some to the point that they would not carry with a round in the chamber. Getting them to carry around the house for a period of time helped quite a bit in alleviating their hesitance in carrying with a round in the chamber. The other item I tell them is take a reputable tactical pistol course! Just because you can carry, doesn't mean that you know what the hell you're doing, get qualified and proficient in the use of the firearm. Confidence levels go up mathmetically when they've gone through a pistol course and they know how to REALLY run their firearm and keep it running should they ever have to use it. It's more than just showing up at a range and going through the "usual square range routine" and calling it training.
    I guess that's why I enjoy working with female students much more than male. This is a generalization I know, but it seems women tend to listen more and better and focus on what you tell them, they tend to become better shots faster than men do. My experience with male students is that you have to first "unlearn" a few bad habits and deal with the mentality that because we are male, we are genetically programmed to be the next Vasili Zaitsev or something.
    The BOLD above sums it up Sir. Read and re read!!!! JMO
    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  10. #40
    Member Array GunsAndViolince's Avatar
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    Yeah, pretty soon you'll be having to remind yourself to remember that feeling of mindfulness or 'nervousness' if you will. You can carry at home, of course. I found that to be a great help in teaching me to stop fidgeting with it, etc. You can test your carry gear and get used to it.

    The folks talking about training are giving you some really good advice. You kinda think you know what you're doing until someone starts asking you to shoot with your non-dominant hand, or loads your mag with a couple snap caps to test your ability to clear malfunctions, etc., or many of the other things you'll be asked to do by an instructor, depending on what kind of training you're getting. Do it. You really, really won't be sorry. Plus it's super fun!!!

    Best wishes,
    Gav

  11. #41
    VIP Member Array boricua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frado View Post
    I was nervous the first few times carrying but the more I carry the more my gun becomes an extension of my body. I also practice drawing my loaded pistol with my carry clothes on. To me it gives me more confidence and practice in handling a loaded weapon.
    Practicing drawing, presentation, and/or reholstering with live ammo is very dangerous. I would strongly suggest that you use snap caps, instead of live ammo, if you feel the need to have your weapon "loaded" while practicing.
    FloridaBiker likes this.
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  12. #42
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    We're putting guns in holsters and concealing them on our persons, yes. Though, I'll grant you that many just dismiss it as an affectation in which so many are carrying them "in their pants." Nearly all are far more responsible than that.

    Myself, I was hyper-aware of the new responsibility, in all its forms, yes. But I wouldn't say nervous.

    Have carried in three different states, including might-never-issue and shall-issue. Spent 2yrs learning basic pistol/revolver handling, safety and shooting competency while pursuing knowledge about the firearms and use-of-force statutes. Have been carrying nearly 20yrs.

    So long as I felt competent enough, accuracy-wise, to avoid the proverbial 3yr old child across the street if needing to shoot to protect my life, and so long as I could safely handle and keep holstered and concealed my carry weapon, then I have been basically comfortable with the idea of my carrying around others. I've not yet experienced a deadly attack that required firing, but I have drawn and halted a multi-person attack on me previously (once).

    You're correct to be cognizant of your carrying and your responsibility at all times. But it need not overcome you. Carry everywhere you're legally allowed to do so, for awhile. (Ideally, do that, period.) In a relatively short period of time, it should begin to feel comfortable enough to not be concerned (assuming solid competency with the gear, drawing, the statutes and your abilities).

    Have error-free carry gear, ergonomic and quality enough to become a part of you. Practice sufficiently frequently to remain competent in its operation and use, including drawing from your carry clothes/jacket. Train as much as you're able under competent instructors, including in force-on-force situations (simulations).

    Be well aware of the limitations and extent of the use-of-force statutes. Be very aware of just how far you can take things. Review the A.O.J. (Ability, Opportunity, Jeopardy) standards as they pertain to the use of force. (See my signature line for a link.) Consider what you're prepared to lose in this life if forced to actually use lethal force to defend yourself or others, and how hard you'll need to fight to retain those things. In terms of relationships, financially, socially, career-wise ... one can take an awful hit, if it does happen, and very much so if done badly.

    Take plenty of time to think through the various situations you are likely to get into or be faced with. It might be in the car, walking in town, just exiting your home, lounging around in the back yard, playing with your kids at the park, or wherever. The main thing is: you'll never know when it comes, except when it blows sideways right in front of you. Your primary responsibility is to be prepared for that eventuality, and to handle it responsibly and effectively if it does.

    Welcome to carrying.
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  13. #43
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GH View Post
    I was never actually nervous about carrying. However I always have it lurking in the back of my mind that I'm packing a loaded ready-to-go firearm. I like the feeling. I'm nervous when I'm not carrying.
    Honestly, I can't remember ever being nervous about carrying. I remember being uncomfortable when I first started CCing. But, that was about getting used to IWB instead of OC. (Good holster, good belt & good CC garments and everything will be golden.)

    -

  14. #44
    Member Array ElkSniper's Avatar
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    Good Thread. Lots of good advice and information.

    The only thing that surprised me was that it took until post #30 for someone to mention the Wally Walk. I seriously think that it is a good idea - it demonstrates that others are really in their own world, and don't notice others around them, much less whether there is a slight bulge at your waist just above your belt. A Wally Walk removes a little of the natural paranoia that comes with new carriers.
    tcox4freedom likes this.

  15. #45
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    Just wanted to add a couple of things to all of the above. Don't walk around checking to see if your gun is still there, that can "out" you to people who know what you're doing. Make sure you use a holster with good retention. If you're doing something really physical, either at work or some activity, make sure your gun stays where it should. If you do remove it to show your best buddy or someone else, MAKE IT SAFE FIRST! Don't hand them a loaded weapon to wave around and holler "Bang, bang!" And if you remove your gun and lay it down, like in a restroom, make sure you don't leave it behind.

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