Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns)

Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns)

This is a discussion on Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns) within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am right handed, but I like to carry my firearm in a left-handed holster at 5:30. This has never been an issue when carrying ...

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Thread: Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns)

  1. #1
    Member Array R040607's Avatar
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    Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns)

    I am right handed, but I like to carry my firearm in a left-handed holster at 5:30. This has never been an issue when carrying striker-fired pistols or revolvers. But if f I am carrying a 1911 cocked and locked, should I be concerned that the safety would be exposed to possibly disengaging accidentally?? My gun is in excellent condition and takes a deliberate movement to disengage the safety, but I wanted your opinion.


  2. #2
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    If the gun is in good operating condition and the holster fits it properly, it shouldn't matter what position it is carried in.
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    "I am right handed, but I like to carry my firearm in a left-handed holster at 5:30. This has never been an issue when carrying striker-fired pistols or revolvers. But if f I am carrying a 1911 cocked and locked, should I be concerned that the safety would be exposed to possibly disengaging accidentally?? My gun is in excellent condition and takes a deliberate movement to disengage the safety, but I wanted your opinion."

    If you have done a function check and everything is operating correctly then your 1911 still cannot fire because the thumb safety needs to be OFF - AND...the "grip safety" needs to be depressed before the trigger can move rearward. The grip safety physically blocks the trigger.

    Also any time you draw your 1911 from the holster your index finger should be off the trigger so if that index finger is off the trigger..
    How could the pistol discharge even if the thumb safety was in the OFF position?

    Answer: It cannot.

    Your thumb safety should have a very positive "click" on and off. It should not ever move to the off safe position until you intentionally click it off.
    If your thumb safety seems mushy and without a positive click then your firearm should go to a gunsmith to have that fixed.
    It would be a very easy and minor repair.

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array hardluk1's Avatar
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    I guess I look at this a little differently. It should allways be on your mind. You do still have a grip safety and a finger safety as back up. Why left side, Some kind of cross draw thing.

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    I have carried a 1911 frame for 40 years, never cocked. It is too easy to have an accident. Getting it out to the ready and cocking can be done in 2-4 seconds if you have to use it. just getting it out for show, better it isn't cocked. If you are not very experienced in combative situations, a cocked single action with a trigger pull under 4lb WILL go off without you even thinking about it. For those who have never been in combat, better with a double action trigger, you won't accidently shoot someone or yourself.

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    Member Array NorthernVandal's Avatar
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    Are you saying that you carry it with the weapon's grip on your right side and slide top on the left? Essentially, the left side of the gun is outward facing when in the holster? There are two ways to carry it, that is more preferable when SOB carrying for me. As to your concerns, it's a 1911, be confident with it in condition one, that is the intent of the weapon. But always be aware of that fact.
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    New Member Array HYDRO's Avatar
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    Unless a person is combat experienced they should never carry a 1911 frame gun COCKED, with or without the safety on. Inexperienced shooters, (combat inexperienced) will be nervous, and up on adrenalin, won't have time for or be very able to locate the safety, and have the gun IN BATTERY in 2-4 seconds. Much longer and you are probably dead anyway, gun goes off prematurely or can't get the safety off, your dead. For me, no safety and first click, hammer off the pin.
    Last edited by HYDRO; January 27th, 2013 at 01:35 PM. Reason: add a few words

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    Cocked & Locked Carry (Safety Concerns)

    I've been carrying 1911s for years.......everyday usually from September thru early summer. I'm left-handed & have ambi safeties on all of them.

    I also carry with the hammer cocked & safety on. Every now & then the safety on the left side gets knocked off, no big deal. The function of a good 1911 will ensure that it won't go off unintentionally.

    If you're not comfortable with cocked & locked on a 1911, then carry something else. If you ever need your firearm, you shouldn't depend on having enough time to thumb the hammer back or rack the slide. You may not have the extra hand to work the slide.....When you need it fractions of a second could make the difference of going home or not.

    The progression I have seen over the years with handgun carriers (especially with older shooters) is this:

    1st gun is usually a revolver or now a days something in semi auto like a Glock with a heavy trigger.
    2nd gun semi auto that is a little more complex, like maybe a Sig 228, 229

    3rd gun usually a 1911, the 1911 may not be for novices, but with some or a lot of training.....NOTHING BEATS the trigger on a 1911.

    YMMV
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    Just...Wow!?
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    Member Array NorthernVandal's Avatar
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    You are in the minority, Hydro. What you recommend goes against every aspect of a 1911. Not to offend, but that is not good advice.
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    New Member Array HYDRO's Avatar
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    I just wonder how many of the "good advice" writers have been in combat, drawn a 1911 and used it in action. I have, that's how I carried it, and I'm still here to talk about it.

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    Member Array NorthernVandal's Avatar
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    Boasting about being "in combat" is not relevant to a concealed carry scenario, nor does it lend credibility to poor advice. A prerequisite for carrying should not be one's history of whether or not they carried an OWB pistol in a situation knowing full well they were already in a life or death environment. I am happy you made it through combat but that is not healthy advice for anyone carrying a 1911. If it works for you, awesome, it is still not the safest or intended way to carry a 1911.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HYDRO View Post
    I have carried a 1911 frame for 40 years, never cocked. It is too easy to have an accident. Getting it out to the ready and cocking can be done in 2-4 seconds if you have to use it. just getting it out for show, better it isn't cocked. If you are not very experienced in combative situations, a cocked single action with a trigger pull under 4lb WILL go off without you even thinking about it. For those who have never been in combat, better with a double action trigger, you won't accidently shoot someone or yourself.
    Ummm... please refer to post #3 in this thread.

    How often do you get your gun out "for show"?

    If you carry a 1911 "never cocked," I certainly hope you don't keep a round chambered - THAT is more dangerous than cocked and locked.
    Smitty
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    New Member Array HYDRO's Avatar
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    I was offering my opinion not boasting, I don't boast about my experience, was just trying to help the guy out. for show means show of force, at times is used hoping not to have to use deadly force, drawing your gun with a warning as opposed to drawing and firing. There is nothing "dangerous" about a chambered round with the hammer on first cock, can not be hit to fire, trigger will not release it. For me, this is the best way to carry a 1911 frame gun. People in an actual combat situation are very nervous with a lot adrenalin flowing. Drawing a 1911, releasing the safety and firing and hitting the target,(a person not a piece of paper) is not easy in a short amount of time. A customized 1911 can have a 2.5lb pull with 1.5mm travel to stop and fire. A harder pull, 4-5lb and 5mm or more travel lessens the accuracy added to the action of releasing the safety verses just cocking and firing (to me) can be disastrous. You know guys, interesting opinions here, interesting
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    VIP Member Array Stevew's Avatar
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    I always test any new holster / gun combination before carrying cocked and locked by making sure the there is not a round chamber and carrying cocked and locked on an empty chamber until I am confident that everything is staying the way I want it. While doing this I carry another gun as a primary.
    R040607 likes this.
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