Moving Up to the Next Level

Moving Up to the Next Level

This is a discussion on Moving Up to the Next Level within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've got to admit that I am a pretty novice shooter. I've had my carry permit for a year and carry regularly, have joined a ...

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Thread: Moving Up to the Next Level

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array jofrdo's Avatar
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    Moving Up to the Next Level

    I've got to admit that I am a pretty novice shooter. I've had my carry permit for a year and carry regularly, have joined a private gun club and go to the range once or twice a month. I typically shoot about 50 rounds with some of those one-handed strong and one-handed weak, but all shots are taken with aligned sights.

    I'm concerned that just aiming at paper bullseyes doesn't make me a good self-defense shooter. If I get active in IDPA shooting, or ever find myself in a real-life must-shoot situation, I won't have time to acquire a proper sight picture. How do I advance to the next level of shooting profieciency so that shooting becomes a second nature act?


  2. #2
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    Array Team American's Avatar
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    Sounds like you've already taken the first step: realizing that there is a difference between target shooting and defensive shooting...

    Practice drawing from your concealed holster and dry firing with an unloaded pistol...
    And try to find a good instructor in your area for some hands on training to learn the correct methods...better than learning bad habits right out of the gate.
    "I surrounded 'em"- Alvin York

    "They're ain't many troubles that a man can't fix with seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six"- Jeff Cooper

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array tanksoldier's Avatar
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    IDPA or IPSC are both fairly good training for some aspects of combat shooting, especially if your club throws in blind stages from time to time. Shooting under pressure, aquiring targets quickly, the idea that there will be partially exposed targets under hard cover and bystanders downrange are all useful for real-world engagements.

    In the military they have a "crawl, walk, run" concept of training. Right now you're probably at the crawl stage, IDPA or IPSC can get you to the walk stage. The only thing they're not really good at is the tactical aspects of combat.

    Once you're comfortable in your gunhandling and marksmanship, try to find a local CCW tactics course, or if you can afford it spring for one of the big schools like Valhalla, Frontsight or Suarez Intl. Those courses are the best training short of actual combat.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

  4. #4
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    Array P95Carry's Avatar
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    I daresay there are many possible suggestions.

    Mine tho would be - if you are able to do this at your range - or somewhere ........... practice draw and shoot from retention at about 10 feet distance.

    Initially just single shot - draw fire and reholster. Inspect - repeat. Once you start to get a ''feel'' for grip and consistency move to double taps - and use that to progress to bringing gun up toward sighted position and further shots.

    Make sure too - that you make your gun hand get solidly onto the gun for the draw - a sloppy pick-up will leave you with a different grip and hold each time. Main deal - is get web of hand solidly into the area under beavertail.

    If consistency achieved with this then you can begin to imprint muscle memory and make it a more natural and accurate move. Be prepared for quite a lot of ammo use!

    Dry fire can be useful as a prelude. Make sure you are 100% familiar with the gun's manual of arms - so dry fire first is in fact near essential - improves the safety element and saves ammo initially!
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  5. #5
    1943 - 2009
    Array Captain Crunch's Avatar
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    How do I advance to the next level of shooting profieciency so that shooting becomes a second nature act?
    The same way you get to Carnegie Hall.

    Practice, Practice, Practice!


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array razorblade's Avatar
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    To quote Team American, you've taken the first step by realizing the difference between defensive shooting and target shooting. Many people cannot distinguish the difference, and unfortunantly cannot properly deploy their firearm.

    I shoot IPSC every month at my local club. I used to shoot IDPA, but since swore off the organization completely due to irreverent issues not related to the shooting sport. In having knowledge of both, I can tell you that any activity that gets you out and putting rounds down rage is good. What you need is trigger time and a decient instructor. I would not go so far as calling any shooting sport (IPSC, IDPA, PPC, ICORE or whatever) "training". They are shooting sports, and as such, you would be doing (or not doing) things that contradict actual defensive tactics. One example would be IPSC's reloading while moving to cover. IDPA has what they see as "sound defensive tactics" such as tactical priority (shooting from nearest to farthest) and tactical sequence (the sequence you are suppost to engage multiple opponets), but they lack certain aspects that would, to be frankly honest, be dangerious in a competative shooting venue. An example would be to "check your 6" after neutralizing the threat. You cannot face uprange while with a loaded pistol. You are timed, which means you are not only competing against other shooters in points, but you are competing against the clock (hence reloading while moving). But what these sports DO teach are proper firearms manipulation and being able to effectively fire your gun. You'll learn how to acquire your front sight from the draw, to watch the front sight lift out of the notch the moment the gun discharges, you'll learn how to properly hold the gun so that the front sight returns to the exact place in the notch. You'll learn how to pull the trigger straight to the rear, so as not to effect your front sight. You'll learn how to maintian a proper shooting platform, you'll learn how to shoot on the move, around barricades, how to preform tactical/emergency reloads *under stress*. But you know what, all of these things can be learned from a good defensive shooting instructor too. But shooting sports such as IPSC and IDPA put it into a fun, competative forum that allows you to pressure-test your skills. Unfortunantly, it isn't the same kind of pressure that you would experiance in the streets and against an opponent, but it's the closest thing next to Simmunnitions.

    I can also tell you that putting a box of 50 down range once or twice a month won't cut it. Your skills stagnate and it does not reinforce new ones. If your schedule allows, you should AT LEAST go once a week. My schedule is every friday, and 300 rounds down range. I reload and I am able practice with that amount. If $$$ is an issue, continue to use a box of 50, but practice drawing, acquiring that FRONT SIGHT and effectively pulling the trigger straight to the rear as to not disturb the front sight. Let the gun discharge. Watch the front sight lift from the notch and watch it return. Then reholster. Continue that 50 times. That is one thing you can do on a budget. Also you can chamber one round in the gun, have an empty mag inserted, and place one round in a mag on your belt. Do the above routine of drawing, acquiring, and shooting, but now your gun is going to go into slide lock. From slide lock, perform your reload of one round and repeat. That way you can practice reloading.

    At home, like everyone else said, dryfire. You can do it while watching tv, it fits your schedule, and best of all it's cheap.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array razorblade's Avatar
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    Oh also, if you do take up competative shooting, double taps will become second nature. You will also have a pavlovian response to egg timers

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array tanksoldier's Avatar
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    Yep. Toaster oven timer went off, I almost shot the 'fridge. [j/k]


    Quote Originally Posted by razorblade View Post
    Oh also, if you do take up competative shooting, double taps will become second nature. You will also have a pavlovian response to egg timers
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

  9. #9
    Member Array produman's Avatar
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    If you check around alot of ranges are now having some kind of tactical shots. These will help alot....Practice the drawing and dry firing at home, this will help with your grip alot.
    "May God have mercy on my enemies, because I won't."
    General George Patton

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