How I realized I really do need training.

How I realized I really do need training.

This is a discussion on How I realized I really do need training. within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I was at the range yesterday practicing with my XDs. I've only been carrying a couple of months and the XDs is my first semi-automatic ...

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Thread: How I realized I really do need training.

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    Member Array Mikemgb's Avatar
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    How I realized I really do need training.

    I was at the range yesterday practicing with my XDs. I've only been carrying a couple of months and the XDs is my first semi-automatic so I was just practicing grip and shooting without using the sights.

    I was running through a box of Remington FMJ, everything was going OK, except I was shooting low, which I'm working on, when suddenly, the gun just went click.

    I froze, I had no idea what to do, yeah, I know about smack and rack but did I remember that at the time? No, I just stood there looking stupidly at the gun wondering what had gone wrong.

    I did know that training would probably be a good idea, yesterday bought home to me how absolutely necessary it is.
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    Member Array CCinaG26's Avatar
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    Bad primer?
    that's what you described anyway. you did all you can do. keep gun pointed in a safe direction and wait a few moments. eject the shell and keep shooting.

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    Member Array Mikemgb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCinaG26 View Post
    Bad primer?
    Yes, I even ran it back through and it failed to fire the second time too.

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    Member Array CCinaG26's Avatar
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    first time it happened to me was last week. For some reason I assumed something broke on my glock, lol, ridiculous. I didnt know how long I should keep it pointed down range. It was 115 grain fed. 9mm.

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikemgb View Post
    ... when suddenly, the gun just went click.

    I froze, I had no idea what to do ...

    I did know that training would probably be a good idea, yesterday bought home to me how absolutely necessary it is.
    Malfunction/clearing drills are very important. You can poke around on Youtube and find a few good examples of the basic drills, and it's easy enough to keep practicing such techniques each and every time you're out shooting.

    Most folks don't work nearly enough on these things. Me included.
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    Distinguished Member Array Exacto's Avatar
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    That mistake would be deadly had you been involved in a self defense situation. Look for a good combat firearms training course in your area.
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    Member Array latentcarry's Avatar
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    Be careful, lots of things I might do in this case would not be considered "range etiquette". Happens to all of us eventually. Its like OMG what happened, first you want to look down the barrel and see whats up but not a good idea. Hopefully you stand there in indecision for long enough that your bystanders think you are holding for long enough to safely decide round is not a "hangfire" and will not go off ( seriously keep it pointed downrange for at least a minute). Clear the round...there should be a bucket of water around a corner and well away from the people for just such things ( I now look around a bit so I know where it is w/o having to ask), gingerly drop offending round in bucket. Check weapon for issues, reload and try again.
    Funny as a youngster I never recall having any misfires but I didn't shoot as many rounds as now and I have had a couple in last few months. I wonder how much the increased incidence is related to the manufacturers going full blast 24 hours a day or could it be related to the number of rounds coming off the lines or is it one in the same?

    I bet you did exactly what I'm saying you should do but took a bit of thinking, I know some things are better trained to the point of doing w/o a thought but I prefer a man that thinks myself. Any sort of clearing drill would be seriously frowned on at most ranges I frequent so I would do those at home with maybe snap caps or something.
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    Member Array Mikemgb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Malfunction/clearing drills are very important. You can poke around on Youtube and find a few good examples of the basic drills, and it's easy enough to keep practicing such techniques each and every time you're out shooting.

    Most folks don't work nearly enough on these things. Me included.
    This evening my wife and I decided that next time we are at the range we will load each others magazines, and every now and then load a random snap cap.

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    Member Array Mikemgb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exacto View Post
    That mistake would be deadly had you been involved in a self defense situation. Look for a good combat firearms training course in your area.
    Exactly, this is a self defense gun, I realized I need the training and muscle memory to make clearing it automatic.

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    Member Array ZOMBIEvs42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikemgb View Post
    This evening my wife and I decided that next time we are at the range we will load each others magazines, and every now and then load a random snap cap.
    I do this too, its good training.
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    I agree with latentcarry. I believe tap-rack-bang is an emergency-only thing you want to practice with snap caps, not with an actual failure on the range. A hangfire is not the most common thing, but it would suck for the cartridge to detonate right when it's traveling past your face. Also, if you have a squib, the LAST thing you want to do is try to fire another round without thinking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZOMBIEvs42 View Post
    I do this too, its good training.
    It's also eye opening.... if you have a flinching problem like me.

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    Distinguished Member Array Nmuskier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikemgb View Post
    This evening my wife and I decided that next time we are at the range we will load each others magazines, and every now and then load a random snap cap.
    I do this, but we set up a misfire drill sequence. For some reason, perhaps leftover habits from the military, if I'm in a combat/defensive fire mode, I can do the clearing drills. If I'm in a "range" mind set, I default to "diagnosis" mode. I want to know why I had a failure.

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    Try competing. That is how I got to the point of quickly recognizing what type of jam I had and if necessary do the tap, rack, bang drill quickly as the clock was running. Not all jams can be cleared with the drill so you need to be able to glance at your pistol and determine if the drill will work or if you have to drop you mag to clear a stuck round. This is why I always preach to carry a spare mag. Not for the ammo but for those jams that require you to remove the magazine to get the stuck bullet out.

    Competing it also excellent to learn to manipulate a manual safety quickly and without thinking about it. When I stopped competing I used to swipe non existent manual safeties off of all my guns that did not have them. That is how automatic it can become when you compete every weekend. :)

    Otherwise practicing the drill once in a while is not going to help much. Repetition until it becomes automatic is the only way to go and you can pay money for training every month or get into one of the many gun competitions in your area. My favorite was Steel Challenge as it is pure draw and fire with any hit counting.
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    VIP Member Array Phaedrus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by latentcarry View Post
    Funny as a youngster I never recall having any misfires but I didn't shoot as many rounds as now and I have had a couple in last few months. I wonder how much the increased incidence is related to the manufacturers going full blast 24 hours a day or could it be related to the number of rounds coming off the lines or is it one in the same?
    +1, quoted for truth. It seems like in the effort to improve volume of manufacture, QC has fallen off a bit. Understandable but not good in a product that's inherently [marginally] dangerous to begin with.
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