Forming a disaster plan

Forming a disaster plan

This is a discussion on Forming a disaster plan within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; While participating in another thread I realize how many people dont have a disaster plan. I have a plan for many likely possibilities....

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Thread: Forming a disaster plan

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Secret Spuk's Avatar
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    Forming a disaster plan

    While participating in another thread I realize how many people dont have a disaster plan. I have a plan for many likely possibilities.
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    OK??? Thanks for sharing, I guess???
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    Great idea having multiple plans, but I promise you if something does go south, its going to be different than we all planed . Being able to adapt to the specific disaster will be key for many of us. The good thing is most of us do plan :) The bad news we are in the minority in the scheme of things . The Takers will fall first . We shall overcome, most will just wait for Big Government to save them ....Good luck with that
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    OK, I found the post in the other thread that puts your post in this thread in context


    Quote Originally Posted by Secret Spuk View Post
    Although all my kids are grown and gone... I have been there so I'll participate. I have talked about this kind of a thing happening with the family. Maybe not just a shooting but a power outage, or other emergency. Unless it's a weather emergency we'll meet at the car. I would call the girls first, and get their location, and proximity to the shooting. I'll either direct them to leave via an emergency exit, or to hunker down in place depending on what I'm hearing from them. Next call to wife with similar sit-rep. Same instructions bug out through an emergency exit, or hunker down. Both will have standing instructions to call me every 15 minutes if possible. what ever group is in the most danger is who I'm going for. Or if in equal danger I'll go for the closest first.

    In florida we have a lot of water. I'd instruct them change of plan and to meet at the canal behind/next to/ or near the mall. Standing instructions get to a body of water ASAP. Being the person I am once I know my family is safe I'd probably work at helping others escape... If I came across a/the shooter I'd take my best shot. And I am a good shot.
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    I wish you and your plans all the luck in the world.

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    I understand what the OP was saying here. When I was stationed in Florida, hurricanes were top on my mind. In November of 2004, we were in the TLF at Minot AFB with the wife having orders to Hurlburt Field. So here I am, a native North Dakotan used to white-outs and blizzards watching hurricane Ivan chewing up the area we were moving to! The great thing about blizzards is that we don't evacuate from them and we damn sure don't name them! So there I was in 2005 in lower Alabama during hurricane season. I bugged out for both hurricane Dennis that went right over my house (fortunately it was a fast mover and Ivan already took down the trees and structures that were already weak so I didn't have any damage) and Katrina that was supposed to make landfall in Tallahassee so yeah, we passed right through the gun sights on that one!
    My disaster plan involved watching the weather channel every evening for any storms in the Atlantic that had a track that looked like it might bring it into the gulf coast. Once that happened, my hurricane shutters went on (clear plastic ones so it wasn't like living in a cave), water and fuel cans were filled and an inventory of important papers, pictures, etc were made. Once the storm would cross a line between Cuba and Florida, guns were cased and staged in the garage, travel kennels for the dog and cats were staged along with their bug out bag of food, water and bowels, important papers and documents were boxed up and staged as well and fuel tanks on the jeep and truck weren't allowed to get below 3/4 full. Then it was onto watching the weather channel most every waking moment watching the storm track. Within 24 hours of the storms predicted landfall, the decision would be made weather to ride it out or bug out to the mother in laws in Jasper, Alabama. In both bug out cases, it was only a matter of a few hours to load the truck, the wife's SUV, pull my jeep into the garage, lock the storm bar in place and be on the road. This is my example of having a disaster plan that I have actually put into practice.
    What I learned from this sort of thing is that most disasters do come with some sort of sign that things can go bad, if you pay attention to it. Here a few days ago in SE Wyoming, I ran my first "tornado drill" for this area. Bad weather was coming in from the west and the weather radio was putting out tornado watch and warnings. While it was still a ways out, I took the time to once again, move all my guns, important pictures and papers into the basement long before the storms got out here. Turned out the storms went further south as their tracks progressed so once they were east of me, I hauled everything back up again! Yeah, makes for a bit of work and all but I looked at it as running a pretty good drill of what to do when an impending disaster like this comes up again and have a good time line of how long it will take to accomplish any preps like this. We all like to think on this board of having a plan ready to go should we have an encounter with the boogey man on the street or in our home but another important thing to consider in keeping either ourselves or loved ones safe is having a plan in place, ready to go when that boogey man turns out to be a disaster be it man-made or the work of mother nature as well.
    BlueHawk76, Tutapper and Bad Bob like this.

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    We just had a scenario here during this last and latest thunderstorm. A nearby home was struck by lightning and the attic caught fire.
    The family had to quickly exit their home in the dead of night. The time was approximately 2:30 in the wee hours.
    The house suffered smoke and water damage.
    Some sort of a Bug Out Bag or Grab It And Go Bag equipped with some family essentials, cash, clothing changes, etc etc. would likely have come in real handy for them...I'm sure.
    I do not live in a "disaster prone" area AKA no flooding or hurricanes, or tornadoes, wild fires, earthquakes, and so on but, completely unexpected events can always happen.
    It's wise to be prepared for an emergency evacuation.
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    There always them pesky asteroids to worry about
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    I have found when talking to many people is that most have wishes and hopes when it comes to their plans.
    In just the few postings I read here, I saw words like (watch TV) (Call on the phone) (load my truck) etc..etc...assuming these items will still be of use or [should] be used.

    Preppers don't share the crux of planning. Why would they?

    I remembered when I began a survival plan "in the event of." The number of (things) one needs to account for is staggering.

    If you are (John Rambo) all is well..if you have kids, a spouse, someone requiring meds or a long term infirmity, you are essentially SOL.
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    Thanks for responding everyone. My intent was to start the conversation... Not to brag about my own plans.

    I live in south Florida.... A disaster plan is a good idea for several reasons. Hurricanes, Other weather, Brush/forrest fires, Long term power outages. I'm not a prepper, though I respect the position they take.

    HURRICANES... In the case of a hurricane I have enough warning to make some plans. I can bug-out if I choose to. So far I've hunkered down and rode out 5 of them. A hurricane can cause all the above. With a hurricane if yiu decide to hunker down... you have to stick with that decision. There is no leaving once it's on you. My hurricane survival kit includes
    plenty of bottled water
    three cases of MRE's
    plenty of canned foods
    an extensive first aid kit
    a camping stove and fuel
    Water/wind proof matches
    sleeping bags for everyone in the home
    Flashlights with extra batteries
    a blue tarp

    Once a hurricane has passed there are other issues to be dealt with. Usually there will be a period of no power.. It may last for hours, more likely it will last for weeks. It seems to me that electrical power is the glue that holds us civilized. When it's gone, those who take advantage of others will begin to... take advantage of others. Depending on the length of the outage others will begin to go feral. I can live without electrical power. I'll miss the A/C but I'll get over it. So I have a security plan as well. Not just firearms but intrusion alarms (fishing line and tin cans), trip lines, simple things like this. (any suggestions?) At the beginning of the season I fill up four jerry-cans with 20 gal of gas. I've also been thinking of getting a really small generator, but they IMO are almost more trouble than they are worth. I believe my hurricane kit will see me through any disaster with a bit of tweaking here n there.

    If I bug out it will be in my truck. I'll be able to load up my hurricane kit and a preselected list of my most favored firearms, then more supplies I may have on hand. Then the rest of my gun accumulation.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    When I started to become prepared the possibilities seemed, and probably realistically are, astronomical. B.o.b was priority #1. Still working on those for each of the family members. Having young ones presents its own challenges in that regard. I believe as others have stated, some preparation is physical and the other is mental.

    One of those things I enjoy doing, but hope to never need.
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    Member Array .45acpguy's Avatar
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    OP, good start on your preps.

    I would like to suggest that you add the following:
    A Katadyn Hiker Pro Water Filter (takes most undrinkable water and renders it safe/good to drink)
    Either a Rocket Stove (uses twigs the thickness of your finger to efficiently cook meal, boil water, etc.) or
    A Vargo Titanium Hexagon Stove (uses smaller twigs to cook meals/boil water)
    Potable water is the single most valuable resource. Without it, you die in 3 days or less.
    Oh yeah, for starting fires go to FireSteel.com - Best FireSteel and buy one of their fine products--works even in subzero weather or after it gets submerged and then wiped off. Also, for firestarting: real petroleum jelly kneaded into individual cotton balls. A plain cotton ball will burn for about 30 seconds but with the petroleum jelly they will burn for up to 5 minutes each.

  13. #13
    Member Array fredg53's Avatar
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    I keep around the basics and as much ammo as possible not gonna lose sleep over it I am better prepared and have better skills than 90% of our country

  14. #14
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    Don't get me started in this thread. It's Thursday Night. I could type until Sunday morning and still have more to say.

    If you live in a hurricane prone area you really need to add a decent quality combination battery/Solar Powered/and Crank portable radio w/ Weather.

    Also buy some gallons of plain Bleach and have those handy. You may need to disinfect lots of things and neutralize human waste material.
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    Good advice on the bleach!

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