Is it important to draw fast - Page 3

Is it important to draw fast

This is a discussion on Is it important to draw fast within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; silvercorvette-really smooth draw, scanning after hitting the bad guy(target) movement when shooting good video. I have seen videos offered from top training sites and of ...

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Thread: Is it important to draw fast

  1. #31
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    silvercorvette-really smooth draw, scanning after hitting the bad guy(target) movement when shooting good video. I have seen videos offered from top training sites and of course its not the real thing watching videos and expect to improve but it seems like they have their place for technique and reference. What say you, anyone.
    :P


  2. #32
    Member Array silvercorvette's Avatar
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    It's the same thing as boxing. You hit without getting hit. Make your shots and use lateral and diagonal movement to avoid getting hit. The video that clubsoda22 posted on another thread on this forum is a good example of how to avoid getting hit. The problem is that most of the time to practice shooting in a range with lanes that donít allow use to practice movement. If the range did allow us to practice moving around we would have a bunch of shooters killing each other so unless we find a safe place to practice shooting while moving use situational awareness to stay away from trouble in the first. When I was a cop I couldnít run from or avoid trouble. But as a civilian I do my best to avoid situations where I may have to draw my gun.

  3. #33
    Distinguished Member Array David Armstrong's Avatar
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    Others have already commented on the fact that a fast draw isn\'t that essential most of the time. What is of interest to me is that a large number of defensive scenarios develop slowly enough that the defender is able to get the weapon from off-body carry (briefcase, in car glovebox. drawer at business place, etc.). That seems to emphasize the situational awareness issue.

  4. #34
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    a fast draw is important, but situational awareness and ability to disract/ foil the BG\'s attack is paramount. We were shown a video of a BG 21 ft. away that closed with a uniformed officer before he could draw and shoot. And he was expecting it. better to learn the quick draw as your falling on your back?

  5. #35
    Senior Member Array KC135's Avatar
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    OODA

    If you are not expecting to draw the gun, you will not be quick. Sorry, but waiting for a timer is not the same thing. Even a cold draw is not the same thing.

    Observation........without it you are way behind the power curve, the other guys OODA is way ahead of you. You will come in LAST.

  6. #36
    Member Array Pyrolyzer's Avatar
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    From what little that I know of self defense shootings, you'll probably either
    a- see the fight coming and have the gun in-hand long before speed becomes an issue, or
    b- not see the fight coming and be in the process of fighting or running for your life when you need to draw.

    I think you need to work on a smooth consistant and reliable draw that will allow you to run, duck, dodge, turn, and fend off tire-irons and sharpened screwdrivers while drawing without sending the pistol clattering accross the pavement.

    Another HIGHLY valuable skill is to work on a surreptitios or covert draw. That is, the ability to draw or place your hand on your weapon without looking like you're drawing your weapon. Pocket pistols are great for this. Appendix carry inside-the-waistband holsters are also good since it's easy to bring your hands to mid-line without drawing attention. Behind the point of the hip holsters are tough to do this with.

    Chuck

  7. #37
    Member Array Erich's Avatar
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    Good post, Chuck. :)

  8. #38
    Senior Member Array Prospector's Avatar
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    Cool

    Although I haven't found a range that'd let you practice this technique, but I certainly would consider it......just turn and run like hell (harder to hit a moving target)....all the while, turning your head to try a halfassed aim and shot ever 1/2 second or so!

  9. #39
    New Member Array Partisan_Ranger's Avatar
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    This has been real interesting.
    I have always tended to the swift but stable,smooth draw. In the course of being engaged it would be of the most benefit in my opinion. Situational awareness, knowing by muscle memory were your carry is...carry often and in the same place on your body so it developes a habit. Being trained in some hand to hand is a huge plus I would think as well.

    If you are truely suprised by a subject hell bent on doing you some dirt the opening second of the attack and how you handle it would probably dictate how the rest of your reaction to the event will be affected or if it will be effective at all. The ability to slip or evade a punch or weapon swung at you is damn important. Developed reflex, reaction without truely needing to think. Anything like a good smooth draw is developed from training, and practice. Which BTW is something I need to get back into.

    As ya'll have stated their are few if any ranges that will allow someone to practice such things. So I guess home or somewhere more private would be the best we can expect. In anycase I think a combination of hand to hand and solid pistol handling is the way to go. Practice, practice, practice...take your time but do it swiftly.

    Just my 00.02 worth,
    Partisan Ranger
    People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence in their behalf.

  10. #40
    Member Array silvercorvette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Partisan_Ranger
    Practice, practice, practice...take your time but do it swiftly.

    Just my 00.02 worth,
    Partisan Ranger
    I think that sounds like I heard something like that once before
    ================================================== =======

    http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?disc=39627;article=105394;title=B.J .'s%20%20Tombstone%20History%20Discussion%20Forum

    That being said, close quarters defensive shooting is a different game than hunting with a rifle. In close quarters, being a good shot means taking that extra split second to make sure your front sight is on the target, rather than snap shooting. As Wyatt said, "Take your time - in a hurry."

  11. #41
    Member Array Pyrolyzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prospector
    Although I haven't found a range that'd let you practice this technique, but I certainly would consider it......just turn and run like hell (harder to hit a moving target)....all the while, turning your head to try a halfassed aim and shot ever 1/2 second or so!
    That seems to be what the force-on-force training is showing in schools all across the country. Draw you airsoft gun as a training partner tries to beat you with an empty, plastic 2-liter coke bottle and you'll have to move your feet or take a beating. Put obstacles between you and the "bad guy" and fire from anything but a shooting stance. When you do fire draw and fire, you find the "bad guy" inches rather than yards from the end of your muzzle.

    Chuck
    When it's time to stomp cockroaches, you don't want to be wearing your fuzzy bunny slippers.

  12. #42
    Senior Member Array Prospector's Avatar
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    Cool

    Perhaps I was being a little too joking in my remarks about running, but the real point is that one should not just stand there and try one of those 'television western shootouts' because that just isn't reality. If there isn't cover close-by, then I'd certainly hit the deck, making a smaller target, and also providing me with support for a more accurate shot. Of course, like others have stated before, unless you practice the various techniques, you'll likely take the wrong action, or worse, no action at all. It is real easy to sit here, safe in the house pecking on this computer and state emphatically what I'd do in a given situation, but fact is, I haven't been there (yet), so I can't say for a fact what I would do, unless I practice!

  13. #43
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    The videos were very good in that they showed the 3 basic componets of gunfight survival. Shoot, move, communicate.
    While a fast draw is certainly important to be able to perform under stress, as stated earlier situational awareness is even more critical. If you are aware enough of what is going on around you, you should be able to either avoid the situation or have your gun in hand when it deteriorates into one where you need to shoot. A gun in hand is better than one in the holster.
    Here is a true example of what I mean.
    Last year the wife and I were moving into a new house. We had obtained the keys and were making an inspection of the inside. Starting in the living room and kitchen then moving down the hall to the bedrooms and baths. When we arrived at the master bedroom the door was closed. I thought that curious and automatically went to a higher state of alert, before I could voice my concern the wife opened the door. Inside the door accross the room was a homeless drug addict lying on the floor. I swept my wife behind me and drew my Kimber CDP Compact from my strong side holster and held it at my thigh. With a loud shout I awoke the BG and questioned him as to why he was in my house. He replyed that it was a vacant house he had been sleeping in for a couple of weeks. (he had jimmyed a window in the kitchen for access), I handed the wife my cell phone with my left hand and told her to call the police. It took another 30 seconds before his eyes widened at seeing the 45 in my right hand. I informed him that I would shoot if he moved in anyway. He saw the wisdom of my statement. Police arrived and found him in possession of crack cocaine and a Kabar knife. With the officer present I informed him that if he ever came back I would shoot him on sight. The police officer looked him in the eye and said "cool".
    My point here is I had the gun in hand prior to seeing a need to have it and that it wasn't nessessary to point it at him or threaten him with it. I don't believe it's neccessary to point the weapon unless I'm ready to shoot.
    This has been a great thread guys.
    Heroes are people who do what has to be done, when it has to be done, regardless of the consequences

    "I like when the enemy shoots at me; then I know where the ******** are and can kill them."
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  14. #44
    Member Array hph1911's Avatar
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    In a self defense class I took the instructor taught to draw as fast as you can.....then slow down enough to make the first shot hit COM and continue hitting COM until the threat is relieved.
    Kinda like the Wyatt Earp saying: Fast is Fine....Accuracy is FINAL

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