Is it important to draw fast

Is it important to draw fast

This is a discussion on Is it important to draw fast within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Pleezeee, serious question! Is it important for a person carrying concealed to draw in say 1.5 seconds?? I understand that shooters compete in various events ...

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Thread: Is it important to draw fast

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Is it important to draw fast

    Pleezeee, serious question! Is it important for a person carrying concealed to draw in say 1.5 seconds?? I understand that shooters compete in various events IDPA, etc where time is important and police officers need draw speed at times but what about the normal guy? I have read reports where having the gun or hand on the gun and getting it from the holster prior to the need is important. What do you all think of this???


  2. #2
    Member Array Jacob Lee's Avatar
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    I would tend to agree with having it available prior to need (aka-before it hits the fan:)) I know depending on my dress and carry mode on a particular day, it would be near impossible to get a fast enough draw if someone was charging me for example, so I would have to go empty hand or improvised with other available objects first.

    With a flat bottom shirt I can usually clear quickly enough, but again, if I have to untuck?:huh: Not so simple when the adrenaline hits. I don\'t consider myself blinding fast on draw, so I tend to focus more on positive grip and acquisition with the drills I practice. Awareness, avoidance and anticipation is still the number one option I would think.

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    Member Array silvercorvette's Avatar
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    NO



    It isnt the first horse out of the gate that wins the race, it is the first one to cross the finish line

    The total time it takes to get the gun out of holster and put a hole in the target is what is important. Shooter A may get the weapon out of the holster slightly quicker than shooter B, but although shooter B is slower getting the weapon out he may be faster getting the weapon on target an have a faster smoother trigger pull. Or maybe Shooter A got the weapon out faster but he had to adjust his grip before he could fire, and shooter B already had the proper grip while the weapon was still in the holster. It isnt a contest as to who can point the fastest, the winner is the one that delivers the fastest most accurate shot.

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    A smooth, consistent, RELIABLE draw is better than pushing speed to the point of \"missing\" the draw or shot.

    I would always prefer to have my gun in my hand rather than my holster, but not every situation will permit that. But even if having the gun in your hand saves one second, the BG can still shoot you. Incapacitation times can be 10 seconds or more. How many shots can be fired in 10 seconds? That\'s why tactics are so important.

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    All well thought out response, thanks hope we get some more.
    :P

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    I agree, you need to be the victor in placing the first accurate shot. That may or may not be the awarded to the first one to clear leather. If you and the BG are both good on first shot placement (in a stressful situation) then being the fastest out of the holster would, obviously, be more important, and possibly THE most important. I believe one needs to practice getting prepared positionally to draw your weapon. In the academy they drilled it into us to always maintain an \"interrogation position\", turning your weak side slightly toward the BG, weak foot forward and positioning your hands at the beltline, with the strong hand as close to your weapon as necessary. If you suddenly find yourself in a situation where you need to draw your weapon, you are already set up in the Weaver stance, the taught method of Denver PD when I went through. I maintain 99.9% of the time whether I am talking to a potential BG or my wife.

    When you find yourself in a SHTF situation, you need any and all advantages at your disposal.

    Someone start the Weaver vs Isosceles issue in a new thread, please. I know it\'s coming :P

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    Senior Member Array jdsumner's Avatar
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    You guys may have figured this out already, but I like Randy Cain\'s teachings. One of which is: \"don\'t take the curve any faster that you can make the curve\".

    Dan

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    Member Array RandyC's Avatar
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    The most important thing is to have a gun.

    After that, the speed of your draw may or may not be important. Because it MAY be important, it may be very very important. I\'d definitely practice putting your gun into play quickly.

    Bad guys aren\'t stupid: they will try to close ground on you and put you at a disadvantage before disclosing their purposes. Speed of presentation could be important for your survival. But I try to remember the old adage -- smooth is fast.

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    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    I forget where i read it but i would like to say a book on Wyatt Earp.. Its not how fast your are its how fast you can put the first shot accuratly on target. A person who can slap leather fast but not hit what there aiming at with first shot or make a kill shot on the first shot isnt the winner...



    Went something like that anyways..

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    Member Array hummel's Avatar
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    i feel same as allot of you as well...its not so much speed as it is keeping your head on straight and making a smooth and accurate shot:kay::kay: even if it has to come from the hip...

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    Fortyfive, fundamentals of a quick draw can be broken down into a step process. From there you can analyze where in teh process you are tripping up and work on it from there. I worked with a guy who was a driver coach for an F1 driver (also ungodly fast presentation of a pistol and a tactical pistol afficianado who has attended schools across the US) who said they do not view a race track as a whole but rather in segments. He coached me on my pistol presentation and I have seen marked improvements. As such they would time given portions and see where improvements can be made.

    ~A

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    FortyFive, . . . on another site, one of the signatures goes something to the effect: Old age, treachery, and a .45 will win over youth and speed every time.

    That is pretty correct too. Remember that you have to regain control once you are becoming victimized. Treachery, and slight of hand can help.

    Can you knock over a stack of boxes between you and the bg?:D

    Can you fake a heart attack to throw him off guard (while covertly reaching for that .45)?:huh:

    Can you raise your left hand, look 10 feet to his right, and say \"Over here officer\"?

    These routines are in my bag of tricks, may not fit yours, but they are a better plan than no plan. \"No plan\" is a failure to start with, . . . even a bad plan is better than it. Use your thinking process to develop different \"helpers\" and practice them.:kay:

    May God bless,
    Dwight

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    Member Array AZG23's Avatar
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    I think its important to draw quickly and hit accurately..there is a fine line between speed/accuracy....

    Practice the motions..and the speed you need will follow. You cannot say a blanket statement like yes you need to or no..you dont know the situation you may find yourself in...and may have time to slowly draw it..or it may have to have been in your hand an hour ago. Said it before, I\'ll say it again...practice,practice,practice.

  14. #14
    Member Array silvercorvette's Avatar
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    Situational awareness is more important than a quick draw. If you recognize a problem long before it becomes a threat you wont have to rely on a quick draw. If you have to draw quickly you have failed in recognizing a potential threat. Had you paid attention to what was going on around you, you could have removed yourself from the area or you could have discreetly had your weapon in hand and hidden discreetly from view.
    I look at it the same way with driving a car. If you have a newer car with an ABS system you should never or at least rarely have the ABS come into play. Anytime you need to push the break pedal hard enough to activate ABS you have failed to recognize a dangerous situation and didnt take defensive action so you had no choice but to jam on the brakes and activate the ABS. The same thing applies to weapons. If you needed to do a fast draw you failed to take notice of what was going on around you. So you had to resort to a fast draw.

  15. #15
    Member Array AZG23's Avatar
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    This is VERY true silvercorvette...but you should still have the skill set.

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