Physiological Changes Brain/Body During A Shooting: - Page 2

Physiological Changes Brain/Body During A Shooting:

This is a discussion on Physiological Changes Brain/Body During A Shooting: within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; "Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals" by Michael Martin, chapter 5, has the best discussion of the effects mentioned in the OP that I've read. ...

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Thread: Physiological Changes Brain/Body During A Shooting:

  1. #16
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
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    "Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals" by Michael Martin, chapter 5, has the best discussion of the effects mentioned in the OP that I've read. I think a version of that book is the text book for the required MN concealed carry class. At least it 's the book my buddy in MN had in his class.

    I've been in situations hunting where I fired a .30-06 standing off hand and only knew it went off because the deer went down and the scope picture changed. I didn't hear it, didn't feel it. I've not had it happen with the same intensity hunting varmints or small predators. But there is an intensity to hunting that isn't there on the range and I know I don't shoot as well hunting as I do at the range.

    Fitch
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryball View Post
    You dont train away negatives, you train to what your body does in these types of situations. Train to it, not away for it....
    I really like that, much easier way of looking at the task in front of us.

  3. #18
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Personally, most of the words and comments listed above are just that--words and comments. I do not subscribe to any of that--my thought process is KISS--keep it simple stupid and situational awareness. In a home invasion I will not leave my locked and secured bedroom (only wife and I so no one else in house in worry about). I know exactly where I will be and what I will do and it is simple and straightforward---KISS---you force open the door, you die. I am not worried about any physiological changes etal--I am ready, I have my position, I know my bedroom and I will first discharge with a 12g at that door as it opens. When you talk about potential for problem outside my home I embrace wholly and completely situational awareness. I am 71 and have never ever ever had an altercation that even required my yelling at someone (please no what ifs). I am careful where I go, when I go and what I do--this is not confining in any way--it is just plain common sense--I am aware of where I am and what is around me--odds are I am not even CC. There have been several threads on psychological and now physiological experiences---I have a very focused attitude on my safety--the only changes that I can see experiencing are the need to replace a door jamb and carpet in my bedroom and the need to probably change my underwear. I am not trying to make light of the discussion--just providing my take on this as far as I am concerned. This is an interesting thread but I do not subscribe to it.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5lima30ret View Post
    Fine motor skills are dramatically reduced during the stress of a shooting! This is where you will revert to your training...which should focus on gross motor skills.
    Spot ON Lt.

    I had this drilled into me for years as a rookie cop by the veteran officers who had actually "earned their spurs" in rough old days.
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  5. #20
    Distinguished Member Array BadgerJ's Avatar
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    Kelcarry,

    Good to see you have nailed your options down to a very few, defend in place. Only quibble is 'open the door and die' is that sometimes it's a family member - so you still need to positively identify your target.
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  6. #21
    Distinguished Member Array Hodad's Avatar
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    I would think that the most extreme physiological and brain changes occur in whoever is on the RECEIVING end during a shooting.
    Secret Spuk likes this.
    "Life is tough but it's really tough if you are stupid"

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hodad View Post
    I would think that the most extreme physiological and brain changes occur in whoever is on the RECEIVING end during a shooting.
    Which could be either party, depending on who best responds to their respective adrenaline dump.
    "If I had my choice I would kill every reporter in the world, but I am sure we would be getting reports from Hell before breakfast."
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    Personally, most of the words and comments listed above are just that--words and comments. I do not subscribe to any of that--my thought process is KISS--keep it simple stupid and situational awareness. In a home invasion I will not leave my locked and secured bedroom (only wife and I so no one else in house in worry about). I know exactly where I will be and what I will do and it is simple and straightforward---KISS---you force open the door, you die. I am not worried about any physiological changes etal--I am ready, I have my position, I know my bedroom and I will first discharge with a 12g at that door as it opens. When you talk about potential for problem outside my home I embrace wholly and completely situational awareness. I am 71 and have never ever ever had an altercation that even required my yelling at someone (please no what ifs). I am careful where I go, when I go and what I do--this is not confining in any way--it is just plain common sense--I am aware of where I am and what is around me--odds are I am not even CC. There have been several threads on psychological and now physiological experiences---I have a very focused attitude on my safety--the only changes that I can see experiencing are the need to replace a door jamb and carpet in my bedroom and the need to probably change my underwear. I am not trying to make light of the discussion--just providing my take on this as far as I am concerned. This is an interesting thread but I do not subscribe to it.
    Keep your fire extinguisher handy.
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  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array Hodad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    Which could be either party, depending on who best responds to their respective adrenaline dump.
    Excellent point!!

    If I were involved in a shooting I think I would probably be dumping more than adrenaline.
    Secret Spuk likes this.
    "Life is tough but it's really tough if you are stupid"

  10. #25
    Distinguished Member Array kelcarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadgerJ View Post
    Kelcarry,

    Good to see you have nailed your options down to a very few, defend in place. Only quibble is 'open the door and die' is that sometimes it's a family member - so you still need to positively identify your target.
    Only my wife and I in house--period/end of story. I am in my locked bedroom listening to whoever is in other rooms. The idea that my daughter, who lives 5 minutes away will have broken into my house at 3am in the morning and did not yell out to her parents, particularly if she is in the process of trying to break my bedroom door down is utterly ridiculous. I will not shine a light on whoever it is so I can appreciate whether they are a family member and then allow the BG to know where I am and I will not call out my daughter's name with a "Hi darling is that you?". You defeat my door that is locked and jammed shut with a large stopper and you will be sorry as soon as the door opens.
    I do agree that under other circumstances you ID, if you can, before you decide to discharge at whatever you are aiming at.

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