Help-ideas/tips for post-surgery

This is a discussion on Help-ideas/tips for post-surgery within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm scheduled for surgery to fix a torn rotator cuff. I'm right handed and the surgery will be on my left shoulder. I know that ...

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Thread: Help-ideas/tips for post-surgery

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    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    Help-ideas/tips for post-surgery

    I'm scheduled for surgery to fix a torn rotator cuff. I'm right handed and the surgery will be on my left shoulder. I know that I'll need to be proficient changing mags with with a holstered handgun and need to be sure I do one-handed reload and slide manipulation drills.
    Besides that, what tips or advice do you have for me?
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    VIP Member Array Aceoky's Avatar
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    Pay attention to the doctor's advice and do all the PT that is required post surgery
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    VIP Member Array Easy8's Avatar
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    Had the surgery what a pain in the xxx , biggest tip I can give you is get a nice big recliner. You will not be able to sleep in a bed for awhile. Can not lay flat without pain in shoulder. It really did not bother me at the range after a couple of weeks.
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    Senior Member Array A1C Lickey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
    Pay attention to the doctor's advice and do all the PT that is required post surgery
    I can't stress this enough. The docs really do have your best interests in mind (mostly because they'll get sued for malpractice if you get hurt). So even if you think you can do more, don't push it. A couple of years ago I unfortunately had to have a second spinal fusion after my first deteriorated (through no fault of my own, it ended up being a faulty graft). As hard as it was to deal with, I don't know if I could have handled knowing I caused that.
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    Senior Member Array detective's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkworks View Post
    I'm scheduled for surgery to fix a torn rotator cuff. I'm right handed and the surgery will be on my left shoulder. I know that I'll need to be proficient changing mags with with a holstered handgun and need to be sure I do one-handed reload and slide manipulation drills.
    Besides that, what tips or advice do you have for me?
    As just was said: doctor's advice should determine all that. Put that first, guns second for a bit. You don't want to go thru surgery and then have to be worse and need more surgery because you "jumped the gun" (sorry couldn't help the pun) on your recovery.

    I'm sorry you need surgery and hope and expect you have a successful operation and speedy recovery! PT as was also mentioned and is a GREAT way to aid recovery. I do PT now for a condition and it has taken away 3/4's of what was constant pain in a few weeks. I'm VERY happy with it.
    Best of luck.

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    Distinguished Member Array Black Knight's Avatar
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    In addition to whats already been said get some dummy rounds and pratice loading and reloading drills before surgery. You can use the heel of your shoe or a very stiff belt to rack the slide. Just hook the shoe or belt with the rear sight and push the frame forward forcefully. To reload once the mag is dropped just stuff it into your belt then insert the fresh mag and bring the pistol up. Then and only hit the slide release or you can use the shoe or belt routine from earlier. Use the dummy rounds while practicing this for safety.

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    I was 65 when I had the same surgery, left shoulder, and am also right handed. My surgeon (also a woman who shoots) told me I would probably be ready to go to our previously scheduled intensive shooting school in 3 or 4 months. Wrong. My physical therapists told me I was the best patient they had ever had. They knew my incentive was to get back on the range as soon as possible. After a couple months I could assume my normal shooting position with both arms "up", but it took a full year to get back to being fully functional.

    If you can take the pain pills they prescribe you will get through the first couple of weeks without the excruciating pain I lived with - but if you DO take them you will NOT be safe with a gun.

    You can get back to shooting with both hands in several (depends on your age and recovery rate) weeks. If this was a permanent disability it would be great to learn to shoot and reload with one hand, but as "detective" said, put guns second until you get back in shape. And if you have a revolver, that might be your best bet if you feel you absolutely must carry at all times. Don't worry about reloading until you heal.

    One more thing: For those first several weeks the only places I could go because of the pain were the doctor's office and the physical therapy facility, both of which have "criminals welcome" no gun signs.

    You will do what you personally feel you must do and I wish you the best.
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    Also you can get the laserlyte target trainer lots of fun shoot in your home , check it out
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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    Can't add anything to what's been posted other than best wishes and get well soon.

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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShooterGranny View Post
    ... but it took a full year to get back to being fully functional.

    If you can take the pain pills they prescribe you will get through the first couple of weeks without the excruciating pain I lived with - but if you DO take them you will NOT be safe with a gun.

    .... put guns second until you get back in shape. And if you have a revolver, that might be your best bet if you feel you absolutely must carry at all times. Don't worry about reloading until you heal.

    ....
    You will do what you personally feel you must do and I wish you the best.
    BTDT - Doctor would not let me pick up a golf club for 6 months. I had no problems with the pain medication, but then I had been on 14 different pain medications during the 6 months of PT I went through because they thought I "just" had arthritis rather than a torn rotator.

    A nurse/friend of mine emphasized "Stay ahead of the pain - Take the pain medication as prescribed, not just when it bothers you too much." This is very important for the first 10 days, or so.

    If you must go out and shoot, I have this recommendation; as far as reloading, take someone with you and let them change magazines for you!
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    Quote Originally Posted by high pockets View Post
    A nurse/friend of mine emphasized "Stay ahead of the pain - Take the pain medication as prescribed, not just when it bothers you too much." This is very important for the first 10 days, or so.
    Yeah, my surgeon told me the same thing, so I tried to do that. Unfortunately I have really bad reactions to most prescriptions and wound up puking my guts out, which did nothing for the shoulder pain! So, it was me and plain old Tylenol for the duration.

    It was so miserable that about all I could do other than my assigned PT exercises for over 2 weeks was lay in bed, propped up, and watch TV (which I almost never do) almost around the clock because I hurt too bad to even sleep. My husband told everyone, "I knew she was REALLY BAD when I came home and saw her in bed watching Oprah!"
    Getting old was not on my list of "things to do" in the Golden Years!

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    Distinguished Member Array GunGeezer's Avatar
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    I had both hips replaced and other than the morphine drip, took only one pain pill. One half the normal dose of Percoset gave me me, among other things hallucinations , constipation and ulcer-like indigestion. I toughed it out which extended my PT by several months with the first hip to several weeks for the second. All- in- all, the pain wasn't nearly as bad as it was before surgery. I had been putting up with severe discomfort to debilitating pain for 20 yrs. before finally having it done. Being tough isn't always being smart. Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Easy8 View Post
    Had the surgery what a pain in the xxx , biggest tip I can give you is get a nice big recliner. You will not be able to sleep in a bed for awhile. Can not lay flat without pain in shoulder. It really did not bother me at the range after a couple of weeks.
    I agree....I had the same surgery on my right shoulder and the recovery is a process in and of itself. Don't lay flat, support the arm with good pillows or cushions, avoid movement for as long as the doc tells you, use an immobilizer if prescribed, and watch plenty of John Wayne movies. Therapy is a must or you will likely end up with a "frozen shoulder". My shoulder recovery took up to a year, so don't be depressed if it takes a while. (With all my health issues I never fully recovered from it. My wife had her left shoulder done and is okay now.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkworks View Post
    I'm scheduled for surgery to fix a torn rotator cuff. I'm right handed and the surgery will be on my left shoulder. I know that I'll need to be proficient changing mags with with a holstered handgun and need to be sure I do one-handed reload and slide manipulation drills.
    Besides that, what tips or advice do you have for me?
    Are you a competitive shooter? If so, take a break.

    If not, try not to get into a self defense shoot-out until you have fully recovered.

    Or use a revolver so you don't have to rack the slide.

    I've known many a people with this type of surgery. You'll have that shoulder the rest of your life, don't push it.
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    VIP Member Array GhostMaker's Avatar
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    Oh yeah...said a prayer for you and your recovery. May God bless and keep you.
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