Was this being paranoid? - Page 2

Was this being paranoid?

This is a discussion on Was this being paranoid? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Had it been a tactical balloon, you would've been the only one ready....

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Thread: Was this being paranoid?

  1. #16
    Member Array Dan M.'s Avatar
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    Had it been a tactical balloon, you would've been the only one ready.


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    I wouldn't go so far as to call it "paranoid," but I would say that it's an overreaction.

    Why is the gun the automatic thing you rush to deploying when something that is out of the ordinary happens? Would you handle a gas-line explosion using a gun? Would you handle a blown light-bulb with a gun?

    Some around the gun forums cynically say, "When your only tool is a hammer, you see everything as a nail," or words to that effect. That's what this sounds like.

    Your real tool should be your mind: you should calmly observe what is going on before you decide what tool your hand is going to reach for, if it even needs to reach for anything.


    I have to say that for some reason I don't know, the "jumpy" reflex has pretty much disappeared from me. I very rarely, if ever, get "startled" to where I visibly flinch. I have been in situations where an alarmingly loud noise sounds off (boom, crash, etc.) where others around me nearly jumped out of their skins, and I was calm and steady the whole time from before to after. I didn't do anything to make this happen, it just seems to have naturally occurred. I also rarely get adrenaline jolts anymore -- not even after close calls with things like near-traffic-accidents, or altercations. I sometimes get a little adrenalized. Maybe it's a result of pilot and skydiving training to have adrenaline diminish. I don't know.

    So the happy result is, though, that if loud noises happen, I usually remain quite in control of both my mental and physical faculties, without jumping or flinching or getting the shakes. Perhaps it's a mindset that can be practiced. I'd say you have to start with visualizing yourself being calm through anything. That's one thing I know I've always done. Try to be kinda "Jedi-like."

  3. #18
    Member Array tnoisaw's Avatar
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    I had the same reaction to a car backfiring at Walmart. I held my wife back behind a SUV and put my hand on my gun and then checked to see what it was. I don't believe it was an over reaction on my part but a precautionary reaction. I didn't draw and figured out what it was after the second backfire.

    I would have done the same thing as a military LEO years ago. It's called training and readiness.
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  4. #19
    Member Array oregonshooter's Avatar
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    Moving behind cover without drawing attention to yourself is one thing. Having an auto reflex to postion 1 of the draw because you heard something that you can't figure out is bad tactics IMO.

    NOBODY should know you have a gun until you use it. Period.

    Moving to the "one" just announced to anyone looking that you are armed.

    Then again, maybe I'll light some firecrackers off in the WallyWorld parking lot and see how many newb CHL guys grab their guns, since they all seem to make that their maiden voyage when they start packing.

    Situational awareness is suppose to fit the situation.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    The first public place I ever went while wearing a concealed firearm was a 7-11. I had my S&W 411 in a small-of-the-back IWB holster. Felt weird.

    I now carry something smaller, by the way.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Array gwhall57's Avatar
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    ...and this is another good reminder that it's probably best, if at all posible, to have a wall at your back. Even before I started carrying, I always liked to sit in a restaurant or any public place so that no one could approach me from behind...guess I was the victim of too many wedgies inflicted by my older brother when I was a kid...
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  7. #22
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    The only way i will set with my back to the room is if my wife sets oppisite me ( she is a former deputy sheriff too that i helped train up ) If that cannot be done i make excuses and set elsewhere or forgo the evening . As described here in the first post, I wouldn't have iniated the draw , but folks would have been stareing at me anyway when i stood up and turned to see just what the unexpected noise was . ( get mobile , get armed , get cover ) . If someone i trust sets oppisite me , i can do the back to the room thing and i look to thier reaction to cue off of , if i cant trust someone with a view then as pointed out it can be embarassing .
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gwhall57 View Post
    ...and this is another good reminder that it's probably best, if at all posible, to have a wall at your back. Even before I started carrying, I always liked to sit in a restaurant or any public place so that no one could approach me from behind...guess I was the victim of too many wedgies inflicted by my older brother when I was a kid...
    +1 on that.I came of age in hard core Kansas City bars in the 1960's and learned early to always sit with your back to the wall,preferably close to the door.You only went to your gun ,you didn't pull it.Natural reaction and good judgement, IMHO.

  9. #24
    Member Array walther1's Avatar
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    Kinda reminds me of the time in the movie Ronin when DeNiro sets the "sign ambush" up to see what the security detail of an entourage was like. This could be the same thing.

    I am with peacefuljeffrey on this one. I would simply look around and see what was going on before putting hand on gun or making move. So to answer your question, yes, I think you are paranoid. :)

    The good thing is that my opinion doesn't matter. Do what is right for you.
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  10. #25
    Distinguished Member Array snowdoctor's Avatar
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    no way is that paranoid...but next time you have to sit with a view. It is a must for me, even with friends. I can't relax and have a good time with my back to the 'action'.
    ----DOC-----

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  11. #26
    Member Array LTPhoon's Avatar
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    I have to say that for some reason I don't know, the "jumpy" reflex has pretty much disappeared from me. I very rarely, if ever, get "startled" to where I visibly flinch. I have been in situations where an alarmingly loud noise sounds off (boom, crash, etc.) where others around me nearly jumped out of their skins, and I was calm and steady the whole time from before to after. I didn't do anything to make this happen, it just seems to have naturally occurred. I also rarely get adrenaline jolts anymore -- not even after close calls with things like near-traffic-accidents, or altercations. I sometimes get a little adrenalized. Maybe it's a result of pilot and skydiving training to have adrenaline diminish. I don't know.
    Very interesting, peacefuljeffrey. I'm in the same boat, in every particular, for more or less the same reasons. Plus age. I thought maybe it was just me. I like to get a sense of where I am and what's going on, a seat with a view of as much of the environment as is available and be calm during the assessment phase of any anomalous event.

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