Book Review: Defensive Revolver Fundamentals by Grant Cunningham

This is a discussion on Book Review: Defensive Revolver Fundamentals by Grant Cunningham within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I'm half way through this book and all I can say is this guy makes a ton and a half of common sense. His realistic ...

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Thread: Book Review: Defensive Revolver Fundamentals by Grant Cunningham

  1. #1
    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    Book Review: Defensive Revolver Fundamentals by Grant Cunningham



    I'm half way through this book and all I can say is this guy makes a ton and a half of common sense.

    His realistic view of probable SD scenarios and how to train for and prepare for them really resonates with me.

    Some key points in his book:

    Train for the probable scenarios first and most often. Limit training of "possible" scenarios. Everyone has a limited amount of time and money: train for the surprise assault outside your neighborhood grocery store more than a mall shooting or North Korean paratroopers, because a mugging outside a store is simple more probable.

    He emphasizes the importance of reality based training. Beyond just putting lead thru paper. And not going as far as qualifying IDPA matches as training.

    He promotes point shooting, the isosceles stance, the realistic use of dry fire training and, for the revolver aficionados out there, a very good grip and trigger control technique.

    This book is only partially about revolvers. But the training, technique and mindset chapters apply across the entire spectrum of civilian self defense.

    It's a great read and highly recommended.


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    Grant Cunningham is a great read, and he's a regular on "The Gun Nation Podcast" with Doc Wesson. Good stuff.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DetChris View Post
    I'm half way through this book and all I can say is this guy makes a ton and a half of common sense.
    <snip>

    This book is only partially about revolvers. But the training, technique and mindset chapters apply across the entire spectrum of civilian self defense.
    Tapatalk
    This is good to know - I would have taken a pass on the book based on the title alone. Even if you pick-up one or two good ideas a book is a great investment, so for only $16 Amazon will be getting some business from me.
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    The book is much more about training and tactics, than about revolvers per se. He advocates training to work with the body's natural responses.

    Thus, he wouldn't have a student upright, slightly bladed to the target, concentrating on his front sight and chewing a tight little hole in the middle of his target. Rather, because this is the way your body is going to go anyway, you'd be squared away with the target, in a slight crouch, isosceles grip, shooting a lot of rounds with a situationally appropriate accuracy.

    Training for gun games works against this.

    Yes, he makes a lot of sense.
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    New Member Array GCunningham's Avatar
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    Hey DetChris - glad you’re getting something out of the book, and thanks for reviewing it!

    One point I’d like to clarify, only because it’s a hot button issue in the training world and I want to be absolutely clear: I don’t advocate point shooting in the way that most people think of it. (If you’ve been around shooting forums much you're probably familiar with certain folks noisily advocating methods like hip-shooting using your middle finger to manipulate the trigger, and that’s definitely NOT what I talk about!)

    Except for shooting while in contact (obviously), I teach students to bring the gun fully into and parallel with their line of sight. The only difference between this and the orthodox manner of shooting is that it doesn’t necessarily require the use of the sights all of the time. This is why I say that you should use your sights whenever you *need* to, and learning where that need point occurs is why we train and practice.

    You might recognize this as not all that dissimilar to Jim Cirillo’s “silhouette aiming” concept, or what some trainers today refer to as “meat-and-metal” -- with the distinction that I don’t advocate specific distances for the transition to the use of sights, because that varies quite substantially from student to student.

    In class I go into a little more detail explaining that the gun is always visually aligned, and we use the sights to increase the precision of that alignment when it becomes necessary. In fact I’ve gotten to the point where I call sights “alignment guides”, because that’s what they really are. You can have alignment without using the guides, but when you need better (finer) alignment you use them with increasing precision as necessary.

    Thanks again, and glad to see some of the material resonating with folks!

    -=[ Grant Cunningham]=-

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    Hey Grant, welcome aboard... but hurry back to the guns, mine's been on your list for 5 years now!!!

    For the rest of the DC folk that don't know of Grant, he's one of the top Colt revolver specialists in the country as well as a writer and trainer. You can also follow what he's up to over on Facebook.
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    Welcome to the forum!

  9. #8
    Ex Member Array DetChris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GCunningham View Post
    Hey DetChris - glad you’re getting something out of the book, and thanks for reviewing it!

    One point I’d like to clarify, only because it’s a hot button issue in the training world and I want to be absolutely clear: I don’t advocate point shooting in the way that most people think of it. (If you’ve been around shooting forums much you're probably familiar with certain folks noisily advocating methods like hip-shooting using your middle finger to manipulate the trigger, and that’s definitely NOT what I talk about!)

    Except for shooting while in contact (obviously), I teach students to bring the gun fully into and parallel with their line of sight. The only difference between this and the orthodox manner of shooting is that it doesn’t necessarily require the use of the sights all of the time. This is why I say that you should use your sights whenever you *need* to, and learning where that need point occurs is why we train and practice.

    You might recognize this as not all that dissimilar to Jim Cirillo’s “silhouette aiming” concept, or what some trainers today refer to as “meat-and-metal” -- with the distinction that I don’t advocate specific distances for the transition to the use of sights, because that varies quite substantially from student to student.

    In class I go into a little more detail explaining that the gun is always visually aligned, and we use the sights to increase the precision of that alignment when it becomes necessary. In fact I’ve gotten to the point where I call sights “alignment guides”, because that’s what they really are. You can have alignment without using the guides, but when you need better (finer) alignment you use them with increasing precision as necessary.

    Thanks again, and glad to see some of the material resonating with folks!

    -=[ Grant Cunningham]=-
    Hello Mr. Cunningham! You're welcome and thanks for putting together such a great read!

    I stated most of your points in more mainstream terms such as point shooting and the isosceles stance. I thought it would be too hard explaining your more refined techniques in a forum thread. I figured most people would buy your book and learn the details!

    This is one book I'll find myself rounding back around to very often for reference. And I'll be closely considering force on force classes before signing up for them, based in what you're advocating.

    In any case, brilliant literature. 5 stars from me :)


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  10. #9
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    Welcome to the forum Grant!

    You've done a couple Colt's for a good friend of mine, a Chicago copper named Dave Gxxx, he thinks you walk on water.
    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

    "Diligentia Vis Celeritas"

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    Hello and Merry Christmass everyone.

    OK so I just ordered the book. I'm real happy the My Cunningham is kind enough to give us all some personal time. Thank you sir. Some of the regulars may remember that I have a preference for revolvers. I STAND VINDICATED!!!... LOL.

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    Grant - thanks for jumping in! I really look forward to your discussions on "The Gun Nation" podcasts and have picked up a lot. As someone who often carries a J Frame as my primary, your advice and knowledge has been invaluable.

    Cheers!
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    Hey Grant, Welcome to the Forum I look forward to getting your Book and reading it..

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    Picked up this book last night on Kindle based on this thread, and so far it's been a great read. Now I want a snubbie...I smell an LCR for my birthday. Or any other available excuse between now and then.

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    Chris,
    I think you need to rethink your possible and probables...
    Did you see what the North Koreans did to the White House? If it hadn't been for that one guy with a glock, all would have been lost!



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    Senior Member Array CR Williams's Avatar
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    For those of you that do carry or work more with revolvers, Grant's other book is also good. (Link is to the Kindle edition.)

    Amazon.com: Gun Digest Book of the Revolver eBook: Grant Cunningham: Books
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