What to do when your workplace does not allow you to carry? - Page 2

What to do when your workplace does not allow you to carry?

This is a discussion on What to do when your workplace does not allow you to carry? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; and when you have people crawling all over you and staring at your waistline and examining the contents of your pockets all day it would ...

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 88
  1. #16
    Member Array Fjolnirsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oregon, the rainy part.
    Posts
    271
    and when you have people crawling all over you and staring at your waistline and examining the contents of your pockets all day it would be somewhat difficult.
    I just can't imagine this happening. When I went to High School, putting hands on a teacher for any reasonwas simply not done. (With the notable exception of a 50 person brawl my Junior year where the Principal got his arm broken).
    "Water can flow, or it can crash. Be like water, my friend."-Bruce Lee

    My Blog

    "Luck, often enough, will save a man if his courage does hold."


  2. #17
    Member Array mrshonts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by F350
    Well; I have a couple questions…
    1} Do you drive a company vehicle?
    If yes; do you have take home privileges?
    2} If you drive your own vehicle, is anyone likely to ride with you?
    3} Do you go into peoples houses/businesses?
    4} Has you place of employment ever done any vehicle searches?

    The answers here would determine what I would do.

    I forgot to mention a few other facts that slipped my mind. I work as a case manager for mentally I'll adults and I have to travel to their homes everyday. Every now and then I do transport my clients to different appointments. As to answering your questions here; 1. I drive my own vehicle, 2. yes I do transport clients usually on a weekly basis, 3. I travel into their homes, 4. No my place of employment has never done a vehicle search.
    Hope this helps out! :sheildsmi

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Coral Gables, FL
    Posts
    5,802

    Unhappy Assaults on Teachers

    Quote Originally Posted by Fjolnirsson
    I just can't imagine this happening. When I went to High School, putting hands on a teacher for any reasonwas simply not done. (With the notable exception of a 50 person brawl my Junior year where the Principal got his arm broken).
    Happens with nauseating regularity. But as an observation, it only seems to happen to folks who act like grasseating PREY. The touchy feely sheeple Democrat liberals most often get "split" by an angry kid. Never happens to JROTC sergeants or teachers who also happen to be ex military. Wonder what that says?
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  4. #19
    DC Founder
    Array Bumper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    20,045
    I would probably carry my gun concealed in my car and a knife, OC and/or other weapon on my person if I liked my job. I cannot carry at work (in a State building) but I do carry in my car and keep my Benchmade on me, which is not a problem. But if there should ever be an incident at work, nighthawk and I have both agreed we would be the first ones down the back stairs to the parking garage and the first ones back up the elevator. We'll stop and get the Capitol Police officer in the lobby on our way back up.
    Bumper
    Coimhéad fearg fhear na foighde; Beware the anger of a patient man.

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Away - Health Problems
    Posts
    17,353
    Quote Originally Posted by F350
    Well; I have a couple questions…
    1} Do you drive a company vehicle?
    If yes; do you have take home privileges?
    2} If you drive your own vehicle, is anyone likely to ride with you?
    3} Do you go into peoples houses/businesses?
    4} Has you place of employment ever done any vehicle searches?

    The answers here would determine what I would do.

    F350 your response decribes my job almost to a T


    1.yes yes
    2.no
    3.yes
    4.yes



    So sure it dixtates how i carry do i like my job that much no i hate it righ now im stuck doing what i transfered out of ... Do i carry sometimes most of the time i run a country route when into the hood ya go though ...

  6. #21
    Senior Member Array Prospector's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    615

    Red face

    Although a lot of professions have stumbling blocks to carrying on the job, many of those are simpler to overcome, all of which probably violate the company policy. But, the teaching profession has got to be the most difficult one to decide whether to carry or not. Assume that concealment is not the primary issue. The bigger problem is the "general public" and govt regulations that look at the school environment totally different. Just look at all the "don'ts"...selling liquor, drugs, etc. within a specified distance of a school. Same goes for topless bars.....and "a gun". The GP and Law are just not going to be tolerant, period. These same groups will point to statistical data to justify why these constraints should remain. The Columbines just don't occur often enough to "wake up" the sheeple to alternative methods of protecting students. They will again use statistics to determine that there is more of a risk of accidental injury or death caused by the presence of a firearm and that is a risk they are not willing to take. Yes, it is mostly nonsense, but unfortunately that is the way things are. I am not a teacher, but, if I were, I would not carry while in the school. I would, however, risk disciplinary/legal action by leaving the gun "well secured" in my vehicle. My defense would have to be that I am lawfully allowed to carry protection while not at school, and it is "reasonable" for me to have that protection to and from my place of work. I do work for a Defense Contractor at a highly classified and secured facility (armed guards), and our company does have a policy against carrying weapons onto the plant. I leave mine in my truck, which is parked in a pretty secure area, so slim chance of vehicle being broken into. THat presents the other problem in a school parking lot. If you decide to leave the weapon in the car, it is absolutely imperative that it be secure from break-ins. With that, I'd suggest one of the bolt down gun safes for vehicles. Although not perhaps the best solution, it does provide a means for a teacher to obtain his/her weapon in an emergency....obviously assuming that you aren't a hostage in your own classroom. This is a sticky one.

  7. #22
    VIP Member
    Array Scott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    The Old Dominion
    Posts
    5,050
    mrshonts, Carrying a firearm in violation of company policy is a personal decision that you have to make. It sounds like you are on your own a lot in the field. No searches of your person or vehicle and likely no metal detectors encountered. So carrying concealed would likely be an option for you.

    Now the other questions you need to answer are: Would being fired for carrying a firearm cost you any certifications or licenses? Could you lose your ability to work in your chosen field entirely? Can you live without your income for 3-4 months or longer while finding another job? If your job takes you to prohibited areas, meaning places where it is illegal to carry concealed, that is a whole different level. I can't advocate or support violating the law.

    It is your life, and you have to do what you believe is best for you in your situation. For me that means home alive and well. The job is just a job for me. I like and enjoy what I do, but I don't love it. In other words, at 40 years old I still don't know what I want to be when i grow up.

    -Scott-

  8. #23
    Ex Member Array F350's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Rocky Mountain High in Colorado
    Posts
    1,706
    Scott; those were pretty much my followup questions too.

    1. I drive my own vehicle,
    2. yes I do transport clients usually on a weekly basis,
    3. I travel into their homes,
    4. No my place of employment has never done a vehicle search.
    If I were in your shoes I would fix some kind of secure storage, possibly in the trunk where you could leave the piece while in a cliant's home(unless you know him to be violent)/your office there are a couple gun safes for cars out there. One used a cable to secure to car seat and storage box slides under the seat. But you must weigh the consequenses of getting caught.

  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array David Armstrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    SW Louisiana
    Posts
    1,746
    Sounds pretty simple to me. When you took the job you agreed to follow their rules in exchange for employment. If you don't want to follow the rules, go get another job. It is the only truly moral and ethical option, IMO. If you feel it is OK to violate the rules you agreed to work under, you should also agree that it is OK for the employer to violate the agreement they have with you. How would you feel about it if you found out that your employer was cheating you out of benefits, pay, perks, or anything else that they had agreed to? Violate the law? Shame on you for for violating the law. Violate your working agreement? Shame on you for being a liar and a cheat.

  10. #25
    Member Array Obiwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    251

    Talking

    Every post on this thread has very valuable information. Years ago I was in that situation and my solution was......... pocket carry. I have never been searched/frisked at work nor asked to "empty your pockets". If such is a fear, then Smart Carry!

  11. #26
    1952 - 2006
    Array acparmed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    1,371
    I have worked security at The Las Vegas Hilton for almost 11 years. We used to work armed with company supplied Glock 19's. Then we were bought out by a corporation who decided that we should no longer be armed because the insurance cost too much. Many of us were extremely upset over thier decision.

    Casinos in Las Vegas have been armed since the very early days because of the large amounts of cash that is moved around the floor at all times of the day and night.

    We were allowed however to bring our personal CCW firearms into the building and keep them in our lockers. When a corporate executive found out about this a memo was distributed forbiding this as well. Now we must keep our firearms in our vehicles in the parking garage.

    There are times when several of us carry regardless of corporate policy. Such as New Years Eve, when this town can get quite bizarre.

    IMO it is absurd that Security in a casino has to be unarmed, we are unable to protect ourselves let alone our guests from any type of lethal encounter. There have been numerous shootings lately inside casinos and corporate opinion is that they would rather pay off a lawsuit than allow Security to engage a threat.

    We are not allowed to have any type of defensive devices, ie: batons or pepper spray.

    We did not take this job under these conditions. Corporate changed the rules in midstream.
    Heroes are people who do what has to be done, when it has to be done, regardless of the consequences

    "I like when the enemy shoots at me; then I know where the ******** are and can kill them."
    ~George Patton

    DE OPPRESSO LIBER

  12. #27
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,213

    Culture has a lot to do with it

    Realize guys that in juvenile street culture, personal contact is a lot more common. Watch a group of teens sometime. They typically hang off of each other, they're constantly sitting in each other's lap, hitting each other, etc.

    When they do this to you, yes it's disrepectful, but you're also in their world and their parents didn't teach them any better. In some cases it's even a sign of acceptance.

    Of course you have to be the professional and gingerly handle them sometimes. And occassionally when there's a fight in the hall, not so gingerly but that's a different story.

    Some people honestly don't know why it's not okay to go open someone's desk and start going through it for no particular reason.

    This tendency extends behind juveniles sometimes, which is one reason why I decided from the get go I don't ever want to pursue off body carry in any situation, particularly a work environment.

  13. #28
    Distinguished Member Array LenS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Commiechusetts
    Posts
    1,631
    David, like acparmed I joined one of the largest computer companies (was #2 to IBM) when their entire personnel policies and procedures manual was less than 1/2" thick. When I left there 13 years later, the manual was ~3" thick, mostly what you can't do and what they are allowed to do to you.

    When I signed an agreement to follow their rules, it was during the intro meeting with Personnel and I had never laid eyes on their manual. Only because I was hired as a supervisor, I actually was given a copy of the manual after the fact. This is typical.

    So, you agree to a bunch of unknown policies and ANYTHING that they put in that book later. There are never any "training sessions" that discuss any of these policies (exception is the anti-harassment policy because the .gov requires it). Sorry, I don't feel morally or ethically obligated to obey things I've never seen in advance of agreement. YMMV

    I always took the attitude that my life was worth more than my job, so if it came to that I'd be a survivor looking for a new job vs. deceased. Better trade-off in my judgment!

    And yes, over the years I have been victimized by management that didn't follow the same policies that we were supposed to follow. Do you know what complaining about it accomplished? Absolutely nothing, except perhaps being labeled a "dissident".

    I had an employee cheat on his time-cards (and we found that he'd been doing it regularly), we caught him red-handed (had Personnel call and speak with him at home at a time he was still "on the clock" according to his time-card), terminated him by the book, he writes a letter and delivers it in hand to the President's maid . . . we're told (by the head corporate personnel honcho) forget about the policies, he's to be reinstated with full back pay and we are forbidden to discuss anything about the incidents with him forever! So much for policies! Any idea what that did to employees' desire to follow rules after that?

  14. #29
    1943 - 2009
    Array Captain Crunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    10,372
    Quote Originally Posted by David Armstrong
    Sounds pretty simple to me. When you took the job you agreed to follow their rules in exchange for employment. If you don't want to follow the rules, go get another job. It is the only truly moral and ethical option, IMO. If you feel it is OK to violate the rules you agreed to work under, you should also agree that it is OK for the employer to violate the agreement they have with you. How would you feel about it if you found out that your employer was cheating you out of benefits, pay, perks, or anything else that they had agreed to? Violate the law? Shame on you for for violating the law. Violate your working agreement? Shame on you for being a liar and a cheat.
    Wow, this is a little harsh, don't you think? It seems to me that mrshonts asked a legitimate question in good faith.


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

  15. #30
    Senior Member Array KC135's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    742
    David, no objection if that is your take. Just do not hold the rest of us to your standard.

    What may be moral to me could be different from what is moral to you. My priorities are in any order you chose....God, Family, Country. All three have been number 1 at various times in my 70 plus years.
    Keep the shotgun handy!!

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Bad: Workplace shooting, PA
    By msgt/ret in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 9th, 2010, 11:14 PM
  2. Help make a case for workplace carry
    By pt111pro in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: August 19th, 2010, 02:33 PM
  3. Workplace carry
    By JaCKaL84 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: July 19th, 2010, 02:38 PM
  4. Concealed Carry in the Workplace
    By Headshrinker in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: February 24th, 2009, 11:12 PM

Search tags for this page

can an employer deny you the right to conceal carry

,
can an employer not allow you to conceal carry oregon
,
can workplace deny right to concealed carry
,
conceal carry in the work place las vegas
,

concealed carry in the workplace

,
concealed threat detector private workplace
,
do i allow my gun to be exposed
,
empty your pockets workplace
,
is it legal for workplace to deny right to carry
,
jobs that allow you to carry
,
kentucky conceal carry work place not posted
,
off body fitearm carry workplace
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors