RE: You worry too much

RE: You worry too much

This is a discussion on RE: You worry too much within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Bumper made a very thought provoking comment in another thread. Originally Posted by Bumper Sometimes, Euclidean, I think you may worry too much... Not really ...

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Thread: RE: You worry too much

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    RE: You worry too much

    Bumper made a very thought provoking comment in another thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bumper
    Sometimes, Euclidean, I think you may worry too much...
    Not really worried about it (referring to the extractor thread). Just very curious. Sometimes things get under my skin and I want to know.

    But it got me to thinking.

    We're all afraid of something when it comes to handguns, all of us, from the casual plinker to the veteran LEO with decades of real world combat experience and everyone in between.

    Afraid is probably a bad word. Concerned is a bit closer, but there's always something we're worried about. You wouldn't prefer your gun over someone else's if there wasn't something about the other gun you did not like.

    An aquaintance of mine once literally sat with me for 30 minutes and told me, almost begged me, to switch to semiautomatic pistols because he was so afraid a cylinder would miss its timing and I could be caught somewhere with a useless hunk of metal.

    He further explained to me how such a situation is nigh impossible with a good semiautomatic pistol. It was not out of zeal for his personal choice but out of his personal convictions and general concern for another human being. He honestly felt my life was in danger.

    I assured him I only plan to use quality firearms which are meticulously cleaned in any case.

    I personally have a deep seated hostility towards detachable magazines. Isn't that silly? They're actually safer than integral magazines and allow one to lay down a lot more firepower. But something about that little metal sleeve just makes me nervous for no good reason at all. I've had a dream more than once where someone is trying to kill me and I come across a police officer who's wounded and unable to help me. I grab his pistol and reload it, whoever is trying to kill me is getting closer, and as I rack the slide the magazine falls out before I manage to chamber a round... That's nearly impossible in the real world of course.

    Some people have a fear of a pistol without an external safety. I know several very accomplished people with this fear. I have recently developed a fear of pistols with an external safety. One failure to disengage the safety was all it took for me.

    Some people have a fear of a handgun without a double digit magazine capacity. We had lots of good threads on why.

    Some people are afraid of a cocked and locked pistol, some people are afraid of IWB or shoulder holsters, some people are afraid of carrying a caliber less than so and so.

    The point is that we're all scared of something, and you know what, it's okay to be a little nervous about a Glock, a revolver, a 1911 or whatever. We all rib on people who use something different from what we use, and to a degree we should. You should constantly be evaluating what you're doing and what you're using. It means you're thinking about it, and you've recognized your fear, and you've selected a tool that addresses it. You have coped.

    In the ideal world we'd all own several good specimens of each platform of pistol and we'd all be very proficient in all of them. But this isn't the ideal world. Most of us are better off learning a few manual of arms in depth than learning many of them and understanding none.

    And some things won't change. We're all hardwired differently. Things that make one person worry for hours on end are trivial to someone else. I'm incessantly worried about how clean the bore on my 686 is. The previous owner couldn't have cared less...


  2. #2
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    My point was, or rather what I was thinking when I posted that is the following. I have handled and shot scores of different firearms in the course of my civilian, military and law enforcement experiences. I have found guns that although perfectly sound in design and function I have decided for whatever reason (it is really unimportant) they are something I don't prefer. Put me in a SHTF situation and I would grab one of the many I have passed over and I will make do. And I think most would perform as intended despite my dismissal from my preferences. The fact they just didn't feel right in my hand, I didn't like the design, the safety, the method of loading or reloading, the sights, the grips, the material, the finish, the ballistics or anything else that makes up the choices we are faced with whern making a decision regarding the gun we will own or carry makes no difference in most cases. Faced with a "situation" they will still, in most cases, perform as intended. Guns are no different than cars, trucks, alarm clocks, or any other product. We make personal decisions that make our selection of any particular product right for us. I can't tell you what gun you should own or trust anymore than I could tell you what car you should buy. Personally, I hate Fords. Some of you love them and hate GM and Chrysler (my preference) products. Some of you insist on Intel processors in your computers (or God help you Apple). Not me, I am an AMD guy. Alarm clocks? I hate them all, but I digress. Because you like Fords or Apple computer or alarm clocks, you're decision is no better, or worse, than mine. I might say to myself, Euclidean, you're nuts for carrying a revolver in today's world and you could be saying the same thing about me and my 1911. Both of us are right, both of us are wrong. My decision is the correct one for me, yours is correct for you. Period.

    I don't wring my hands over things like the possibility that an extractor might break. I decided I didn't like the external extractor on 1911's and immediately went on a mission to get a 1911 with an internal extractor to use as my carry gun. Some may laugh at that, some will be in agreement. Big whoop, it doesn't matter either way. I act based on what I have experienced, what I have heard, what I believe. Could the extractor break on a 1911? Yes, the same as it could on a Sig or an H&K. Do you carry a revolver because of that possibility? I wouldn't, you might. Over a period of time, 30+ years, I now have what I consider to be the perfect gun for me at this period in my life. Next year I may decide I need something entirely different, but I doubt it. I think you owe it to yourself, as I think I owe it to myself, to try as many guns as I can so I can decide what I want.

    I would be worried, though, if I had too many concerns about the details. When the caca hits the proverbial fan, you better not be worrying about extractors, whether your gun has enough ammunition, whether the magazine is going to fall out, where you should aim, or what if he does this or that. You better have confidence in your equipment, your training and your ability. As long as you do, and you have a gun that has proven to be reliable and effective, there's a good chance you will come through okay. Every different make and model of gun has saved and cost the life of it's user and it's target. The gun itself has a very small part to play in it.....
    Bumper
    Coimhéad fearg fhear na foighde; Beware the anger of a patient man.

  3. #3
    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    Euc,

    I had a poetry professor in some English lit courses who made this observation.

    "85% of the things you young people fear will never happen," stated Mr. Schichtenburg.

    I laughed, I had some real problems.

    I was half-way through college and it seemed that I was the only student out of 40,000 that "wasn't getting it." It would appear that they would go on to bright futures.

    I was a hypochondriac, a carcenogenophobic to be exact. The campus was in turmoil, and while I knew how to hit harder than these non-bikers, a wall of crazed angry idiots was another story.

    My Mom was drinking herself to death and Dad didn't seem to care as long as she was quiet. My girl-friend Judy, the first woman I cared about as a person had left me, and I had banged her best friend who had left me. I had no debts from school, but I had no money.

    The one hour bike ride between Madison and Milwaukee was the only peace I had.

    Well, Schichtenburg was right. Within months, everything had melted.

    I had spent countless hours wringing my hands and staring out the window at a world I more feared than cared about. As for the war, I didn't care one lick. That was probably the only thing I should have cared about as my freshman class drop-outs started to file back into school under the GI Bill.

    Euc, you don't have a crystal ball. Stop giving the uncertain so much power. Until the first punch is thrown those unknown giants are shadows on the horizon.

    Almost 100% of the people who threaten to kick your ass really hope that you go away. Go see them immediately; the fear in their eyes might propel you.

    "Conventional wisdom" is the Cliff Notes of the guy who hit the ground--hard.

    When you are the only one to rise and you cross the floor with all eyes on you, it is not scorn. It's envy.

    The words "I do not understand" are the keys to freedom and success.

    You see, a moment worried is a moment lost.

    And if you do find yourself shaking in a doctor's office only to find out that the worrisom lump on your chest is really your zyphoid, take comfort in the fact that the townie who crosses you that evening has never seen that much combative adrenaline.

    Life is precious. Enjoy every ounce.

  4. #4
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    Euclidean ~ Bumper...Nailed It.

    You really do think a bit too much.
    When it comes to my personal firearms...I am mostly afraid of....
    of.....RUST!

    I prefer semi~automatic pistols for carry mostly due to force of habit & an early education with mostly all semi~auto pistols.
    The S&W Model 41 target .22 semi~auto ~ The Colt 1911 ~ The Colt Woodsman ~ Walther P38 & others.
    I don't think revolvers are in any way much inferior except for the fact that they are less flat. A good speed~loader & some careful practice evens out the "capacity" issue a bit.

    There sure are bad semi~auto pistols & there are bad revolvers.
    For practical Civilian CARRY & not a War Battleground Scenario both (the clean high quality wheel gun & the clean semi~auto pistol) are very equal concerning functional reliability. In fact you could give a slight edge to the high quality revolver.
    I would rather not deal with the Double Action trigger pull of the revolver & prefer a SA auto~loader. A good revolver that has had a good smooth trigger job is OK though.
    Even with my European BROWNING SIG 220 I instinctively thumb cock the hammer to S.A. my first shot. I have 20 years "under my belt" doing that so...I am very practiced at it.

    Concerning RUGER: ~ In fact (on a camping trip) I witnessed a Stainless Ruger .44 Mag that was absolutely filled to its gills with muddy, gritty, sandy, silt ~ just get unloaded and rinsed under hard running creek water through all of its openings while the action was being slowly worked & it continued to work just fine for weeks after only having the excess water shaken out of it and....it did not rust at all.
    I was decently impressed by that.
    You are not under~gunned with a good revolver for civilian defensive purposes.

    TOURIST...That was a very worthwhile post!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array Prospector's Avatar
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    Red face

    Yep....rust is on my worry/concern list, but #1 worry has been the safety lever on my 1911 getting "accidently" positioned to off while wearing it cocked and locked. Well, that worry was realized Saturday while I was doin some packing of things in my Mom's house....I was wearing my IWB shoved in the front of my back brace. It rides high in the middle of the chest....when I got back in my truck, I grabbed it to put away in my truck pouch, and when I pulled it out, the safety was off....and no, I don't put my finger in the trigger guard area, but I do grab it such that the grip safety is firm in my hand.

    I think my next buy is gonna be a real good OWB holster!

  6. #6
    Member Array armoredman's Avatar
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    My only worry is my magazines, already expensive, will skyrocket as the steel market spirals up, and the dollar plunges against everyone else. Dadgum things are already $37 each, so I can easily see $50 by years end, or higher. If I didn't like this thing so much, I'd go buy something domestic,,,,but nothing domestic fits so well....
    If you want to worry all the time, work in a prison. You will learn to laugh at things other people panic over 24/7, as each day is a victory simply because you went home vertical. Funny, I also used that mental reasoning in the 8.5 years I drove armored trucks.....;)
    If total government control equals safety, why are prisons so dangerous?

  7. #7
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    My main worry is the big 300 lb. crackhead attacker who seems to be invincible. A well-placed headshot can solve that, but imagining a huge guy continuing to barrel at me after a solid grouping of COM shots is downright spooky.

    Firearm malfunctions are a worry, but that's dealt with the best it can be by choosing reliable, well-tested firearms, maintaining them properly and carrying backup.

    Ammo capacity used to be an issue with me, especially after my psycho-ex incident. Practicing often to ensure accuracy solves most of that problem. If I ever need ammunition beyond my backup gun and the extra speedloader/mag in my bag, it's beyond hitting the fan as the Undead must be rising.

    I can't prepare for everything, but I can prepare the best I can for most things, and then go outside and enjoy the day.
    "Americans have the will to resist because you have weapons. If you don't have a gun, freedom of speech has no power." - Yoshimi Ishikawa

  8. #8
    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    go outside and enjoy the day.
    This is where the problem lies.

    If you see boogeymen everywhere, then every step requires assurances and guarantees. Since no one can get you an infallible license for living, then a seige mentality enters the picture.

    You'll often see this with some firearms collectors. They perceive a need in their list of weapons, find something missing, buy that particular firearm and feel safe--for about two weeks. Then there's a 'problem' with the new gun. It doesn't shoot enough bullets, the calibre is weak and puny or 'everyone' else is turning to the latest and greatest.

    A magazine is about the simplest and easiest firearm component to fix, clean, diagnose or replace.

    Since we test our combat fireams (or should), stoppages happen right away. Usually only one of the magazines seems prone to a stoppage.

    Send it back for warranty repair. Or do like I do, pitch it.

    Personally, if you want to worry, consider this.

    Despite what you've heard, automatics aren't really that prone to stoppages, failures and disrepair. Most of my pistols, including the customs, have never had a stoppage. None of my current magazines has failed. In fact, I cannot remember the last stoppage--even with handloads.

    If a magazine ever crapped during an exchange, there are many 'slam-rack' drills to get back into the fight.

    Here's the kicker, if you get a bit of grit under the extractor star on a revolver, sometimes it ties the revolver up so tight that a gunsmith is required to free the mechanism. Not good in a fight.

    Better to carry two revolvers, no make that three, no, an extra one in my boot, and then two in car, and then a clandestine one hidden at my Aunt Clara's...

    ...and here we go again on the endless road to worry.

    It ain't the hardware, son, it's your marbles. And you are talking to the Seven Time Grand National Champion of dropping his marble bag.

  9. #9
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    This is where the problem lies. If you see boogeymen everywhere, then every step requires assurances and guarantees. Since no one can get you an infallible license for living, then a seige mentality enters the picture.
    There's healthy, rational doses of caution, fear and preparedness, and then there's phobias that are best addressed by a mental health professional.

    And that is subjective. Some peole consider more than one carry gun irrational. Others would think having the big plastic knife in my shower is paranoid.
    "Americans have the will to resist because you have weapons. If you don't have a gun, freedom of speech has no power." - Yoshimi Ishikawa

  10. #10
    Member Array TAPS CCW's Avatar
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    All of us should carry a backup. When the excrement hits the oscillator its always nice to know that you have alternatives. You can be every bit as safe carrying a revolver as a semi-auto. Its what you feel confident with. The only reason you use a handgun is to fight your way to a rifle or shotgun.
    T.A.P.S.
    Tactics-Accuracy-Power-Speed

  11. #11
    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    healthy, rational doses of caution
    To be sure. The 'line' is where any fixation gets in the way of work or relationships.

    I do not sense he's there yet, but about the last thing I worry about is a spring in my Wilson magazine. Tussey checked them, I don't have to.

    Of course, there are subjective aspects to this concept, as well. The old question is "Who's a raconteur?" And the answer is "Anyone who is meeting more women that I am."

    Knowing my history, I do think the plastic knife in the shower is a bit over the top.

    However, a nice Glock, in plastic, placed into one of those mechanical food vacuum storage machines would show a touch of mad genius.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array KC135's Avatar
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    Carry multiple guns...........always two, best three. Always have access to a long gun.

    Always yellow. Remember , distract, disrupt, disable, destroy.
    Keep the shotgun handy!!

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    To tie up some loose ends:

    I fear no rust for I have both Remoil and Hoppe's at my disposal.

    For the record I actually think any quality firearm kept well cleaned is going to be okay. Usually when I say something like I'm afraid of external safeties I'm really saying I am afraid of spending months and months learning how to use an external safety and then forgetting to disengage it in when it really counts. I've seen lots of semi-autos FTF, but my personal semi-auto has never, ever had a FTF that I didn't cause deliberately. Not once.

    I agree with the two(three) gun idea, and it's not because I feel any kind of need to deal with mechanical malfunction or lay down more fire. It's because you may be in some bass-ackwards position when you have to draw, and if you only carry in one position you could be in a lot of trouble. That's a very realistic expectation I think. I'd like to eventually carry such that I can reach a gun easily with either hand.

    I carry two of everything. Two knives, two lights, two sets of keys, two multi tools.

    I keep a WA-1 stick in the bathroom, reachable from the shower.

    And to a degree, it's this obsession over certain little things that gives us all the motivation we need to go on. I had a long debate recently over whether it's better to write subtraction problems vertically or horizontally.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euclidean
    To tie up some loose ends:

    And to a degree, it's this obsession over certain little things that gives us all the motivation we need to go on. I had a long debate recently over whether it's better to write subtraction problems vertically or horizontally.
    Vertically of course.

    -Scott-

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    I quite agree. The counterpoint is many texts and standardized tests write the problems horizontally. That throws students for a loop. I find however they more often get it right when they rewrite the problem.

    The trouble is getting them to rewrite the problem.

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