MSN/Marie Claire Pro-Gun Article (Long)

MSN/Marie Claire Pro-Gun Article (Long)

This is a discussion on MSN/Marie Claire Pro-Gun Article (Long) within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; ...not. I so need to find me a Texas gal...... http://lifestyle.msn.com/mindbodyand...&wa=wsignin1.0 I Got a Gun and Loved It" Locked and Loaded By Sarah Liston Being ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: MSN/Marie Claire Pro-Gun Article (Long)

  1. #1
    VIP Member
    Array srfl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    6,868

    MSN/Marie Claire "Pro-Gun" Article (Long)....

    ...not.

    I so need to find me a Texas gal......

    http://lifestyle.msn.com/mindbodyand...&wa=wsignin1.0

    I Got a Gun and Loved It"

    Locked and Loaded
    By Sarah Liston

    Being a woman with a gun gave me power and strength in a throwback environment where females were viewed, defiantly, as the weaker sex.

    The most memorable Valentine's Day gift I ever received was a black nylon fanny pack designed to hold a gun. For my live-in, gun-nut boyfriend, it was a grand romantic gesture and an encore, of sorts, to his Christmas present, a .22-caliber semiautomatic pistol. I had hoped for the new "lady friendly" hammerless Smith & Wesson .38 revolver, but the fanny pack would have to do.

    It definitely topped his gifts from years past: a can of pepper spray and a tactical pocketknife. And the timing was perfect. I had just qualified for a concealed-handgun permit under a recently passed state law — the state, of course, being Texas.

    Every time I jogged in our neighborhood, a safe place by most standards, my boyfriend checked to make sure I had my gun with me. The fanny pack had a special Velcro strap inside so the firearm wouldn't jostle or go off as I ran, although sometimes it bruised my hip. And yes, I occasionally wondered if it was necessary to pack heat for an afternoon run. But I continued to do so — and even began carrying it in my purse. I was pretty sure I'd have the guts to use it if I had to. When I worked as a club doorgirl, I once maced a guy because he was banging my boss's head on the sidewalk. It was that very night, in fact, that my boyfriend first asked me out.

    On one of our first dates, we tried out his brand-new AK-47, outfitted with a rapid-fire mechanism and a 30 round drum. Clad in a 1960s leopard coat and knee-high boots, I squeezed the trigger and heard the rat-tat-tat sound of bullets spraying out, pelting the sides of the rock canyon and echoing back at us. Our other dates included shooting cardboard human-form targets at indoor gun ranges and attending gun shows after Sunday brunch.

    For me, there was nothing weird about living among heavy artillery and having to move night-vision rifle scopes from the table before serving dinner. I grew up in the suburbs of Dallas with a rabidly Democratic stepfather who nonetheless believed that guns should be stowed in every car, crevice, and corner. The nail-polish drawer in my parents' bedroom contained a .357 Magnum alongside the cuticle scissors. A cupboard over the stove housed a holster with a wooden grip peeking out. Going out to dinner always involved my stepdad giving my mom a pistol to keep in her beaded baguette purse. He put NRA stickers on the family cars, including mine. Pistols were everywhere, and although it seemed archaic, paranoid, and even somewhat, shall I say, Branch Davidian, I got used to being within three feet of loaded firearms at all times.

    In my early 20s, I applied to the Dallas Police Department. And though I ended up finishing college instead, I had been ready to go to work every day knowing I might have to kill. Being a woman with a gun gave me power and strength in a throwback environment where females were viewed, defiantly, as the weaker sex. The "good old boy" system in Texas assured that men could climb the workplace ladder with relative ease, while women — subjected to pet names like "little lady," "honey," and "darlin'" — were regarded as nothing more than secretaries and glorified coffee servers (even when they were executives or lawyers). As a woman in Dallas, I was bombarded with giant highway billboards advertising strip club after strip club. I often felt that, given my state's narrow view of women, I'd never gain the same credibility bestowed upon a man. And I was already on the fringe, favoring vintage frocks over low-cut tees and Bettie Page bangs over big hair and fake nails.

    But while my ability to compare the recoil between a .44 and a .45 gave me something in common with the Bubbas, it also sent the message that I was not afraid to be strong. Packing a gun made me feel like a law-abiding version of Thelma or Louise. The power was exhilarating, something I couldn't find through any other means.

    Lots of American women apparently feel the same way. Enrollment in the NRA's "Women on Target" program — which involves shooting instruction, hunting trips, and marksmanship — rose to more than 6,000 in 2006, a big jump from the 500 women who participated in 2000. And gun manufacturers are responding to this fast-growing demographic by making smaller models that better fit in women's hands. Websites that specialize in gun gear are adding lady-targeted accessories, highlighting Kelly-style bags with side-entry holster compartments and faux day planners meant for lead-loading — like the cheekily monikered "Hidden Agenda."

    In pro-gun circles, the term "security mom" has replaced "soccer mom," evoking a new breed of maternal type with a "locked and loaded" mentality. It's something I can relate to. I was always imagining who might be waiting for me in the parking lot, or whether I could reach my gun with a bag of groceries in my hand. My boyfriend relished the feeling of imminent danger, insisting on wearing tactical batons and mace on his belt loops — even at weddings — and choosing aisle seats at the movies "in case someone busts in and attacks us."

    But though guns were a staple of my life, I was put off by almost anything else "Texan." I worked in a store selling stilettos to drag queens. Rather than rodeos, I went to rockabilly shows. You wouldn't catch me dead wearing cowboy boots; I was all about Doc Martens. Barbecue repulsed me, and wide-open spaces made me wonder where the shops were. Politically, I was an outcast, supporting a woman's right to choose, gay marriage, and, yes, background checks for gun purchases.

    I always knew I was meant to live in a liberal city (and dump that defensive boyfriend), so eight-and-a-half years ago, I accepted a job as a paralegal at the Manhattan district attorney's office, which offered an interesting segue from the Wild West. I talked guns with the officers, who were amazed that a woman knew her Rugers from her Lugers. I kept my gun license in my wallet for show-and-tell, even though it wasn't valid in New York State.

    My gun knowledge was a novelty to my fellow paralegals, mostly women who came from Connecticut, New Jersey, and Long Island. I'm not sure if it was the widening of their eyes when I told stories about shooting, their nervous laughter, their sidelong glances at each other, or all three, but I began to realize that my experiences with weapons were not exactly the norm. I began to feel like a caricature, as if I belonged in a Coney Island sideshow as "the rootin' tootin' Texas gun lady." Although there were a couple of assistant DAs who liked to talk guns with me, no one who worked in our bureau carried one — not even those who were prosecuting gang members and drug dealers. This Northeastern approach to law enforcement — tough, but without the need to boost cojones with caliber — began to shift my view on guns. Visiting Dallas didn't hurt either.

    On one of my first trips back to the Lone Star State, I brought a native New Yorker I was dating (who would become my husband two years later). Within 20 minutes, my stepdad had him slamming shots of tequila and shooting beer cans with a BB gun in the backyard. When we borrowed the family car, I remembered to remove the pistol from the glove compartment, since my carry license was no longer active. We later realized there'd been another gun under the passenger seat all along — the semiautomatic that, at the time, my parents thought they'd lost. This wouldn't have fazed me before; now it felt dangerous and weird. Though I desperately missed the big Texas sky, the sweet smell after a storm, and even the barbecued brisket, the rest of the state started to feel like a lawless theme park with SUVs, stadium-size churches, and billboards advertising upcoming gun shows and reminding parents that "children under 12 are admitted free!"

    Because I'd always had guns, I always thought I needed them. Now, having spent most of my adult life unarmed and living in New York City — squashed between strangers on the subway without confrontation, counting a full cash drawer alone at night in my basement boutique without incident after I left my job with the DA, and living through the aftermath of September 11th, when the awareness of mortality and the fragility of life became part of daily consciousness — I'm more compassionate. It's a huge change from the well-defended person I was in Texas, or the homesick Second-Amendment fanatic I became in New York, the one who voted for George W. Bush in 2000, partly because he was Texan and knew what Ranch Style Beans were. It's a vote I deeply regret, given his "Quick Draw McGraw" way of dealing with the world.

    Recently, my sister called to report that she, along with the rest of the family, had aced the concealed-handgun course. Despite having never fired a gun, she got a near-perfect score on the shooting test. Part of me wanted to roll my eyes at the idea of the entire family cleaning their guns together on a Sunday afternoon. Then I recalled the empowering feeling of passing the test myself a decade earlier. And although in that moment I sort of longed to be home on the gun range, wearing noise-canceling earmuffs, clicking the magazine into the butt of a gun, and chambering the first round just to see if I could still do it — I realized I no longer needed a gun to feel powerful. If anything, my willingness to be vulnerable makes me stronger. My newfound ability to live in the moment, rather than in perpetual, agitated anticipation — and dread at maybe having to put a bullet into someone — gives me more joy.

    There's a well-known saying in the pro-gun world: "It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it." I understand why that makes sense — as long as it's referring to umbrellas and tampons. As for a gun, I've come to believe that not having it and not feeling like I need it is, by far, the best way to be.
    Last edited by srfl; May 2nd, 2007 at 12:08 AM.
    USAF: Loving Our Obscene Amenities Since 1947


  2. #2
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,570
    EDIT: Need to read whole article before throwing in my two pennies.
    Last edited by Pete; May 2nd, 2007 at 12:02 PM.

  3. #3
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258
    Are we refering to the same article here?

    I realized I no longer needed a gun to feel powerful. If anything, my willingness to be vulnerable makes me stronger. My newfound ability to live in the moment, rather than in perpetual, agitated anticipation — and dread at maybe having to put a bullet into someone — gives me more joy.
    There's a well-known saying in the pro-gun world: "It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it." I understand why that makes sense — as long as it's referring to umbrellas and tampons. As for a gun, I've come to believe that not having it and not feeling like I need it is, by far, the best way to be.
    Marie Claire has always been anti-gun
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  4. #4
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Well, I didn't say she was perfect...
    But as a woman's magazine article it is a lot more sympathetic to guns than the norm I'm sure, the fact that it is talking about guns rather than solid gold tennis rackets or $3000 dogs is a start.

  5. #5
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,570
    Can you tell I don't read my wife's magazines much?

  6. #6
    VIP Member
    Array srfl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    6,868
    Yeah Miggy....sorry, I needed to add that I was being sarcastic as all get out for by the second page of the article....pro-gun she was not.
    USAF: Loving Our Obscene Amenities Since 1947

  7. #7
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258
    OK, you two are starting to worry me
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  8. #8
    VIP Member
    Array srfl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    6,868
    ....only "starting" seρor?

    Regarding the lady, I find it funny how some folks become "enlightened"......at least in their own minds.
    USAF: Loving Our Obscene Amenities Since 1947

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array JohnKelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    554
    If anything, my willingness to be vulnerable makes me stronger.
    What the $*&@ does that mean?!?!

    How about:

    "My willingness to drive while not wearing a seatbelt makes me safer."

    Touchy-feely B.S. to be sure.

  10. #10
    Ex Member Array dwolsten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    266
    Is this article even true, or did she make up all the stuff about living in Texas and having guns around?

    On one of our first dates, we tried out his brand-new AK-47, outfitted with a rapid-fire mechanism and a 30 round drum.
    Aren't the 30-round magazines for AKs just regular straight magazines, not drums? Drums should be either 50 or 100 rounds, IIRC.

    I grew up in the suburbs of Dallas with a rabidly Democratic stepfather who nonetheless believed that guns should be stowed in every car, crevice, and corner.
    If most Democrats were like this, this country would be in much better shape.

    In pro-gun circles, the term "security mom" has replaced "soccer mom," evoking a new breed of maternal type with a "locked and loaded" mentality.
    And this is the way good mothers should be. Check out the animal kingdom: mess around with a baby bear or elephant and see how its mother reacts. Most mammal mothers are extremely protective of their young, and are extremely vicious towards any threats. Their young wouldn't live long if they just cowered and cried while watching their young be eaten.

    My boyfriend relished the feeling of imminent danger, insisting on wearing tactical batons and mace on his belt loops
    Here's possible factual error #2. I'm pretty sure expanding batons are illegal in Texas.

    Although there were a couple of assistant DAs who liked to talk guns with me, no one who worked in our bureau carried one — not even those who were prosecuting gang members and drug dealers. This Northeastern approach to law enforcement — tough, but without the need to boost cojones with caliber — began to shift my view on guns.
    This doesn't sound tough at all, more like stupid. Would this woman take a tour of Baghdad without a weapon and body armor?

    If anything, my willingness to be vulnerable makes me stronger. My newfound ability to live in the moment, rather than in perpetual, agitated anticipation — and dread at maybe having to put a bullet into someone — gives me more joy.
    I wonder how joyful she'll be when some thugs decides to rape her and she has no way of defending herself.

  11. #11
    Member Array sailormnop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Tidewater, VA, USA
    Posts
    292
    Her ability to "not have a gun and not feel that she needs one", just means that she's gotten lucky so far. Her feeling of security doesn't equate to actual security.

    This is definately an anti-gun article. She takes the approach of "I was one of them and this is how they think, but I've learned the truth and know better now." She's even nice about it, further endearing herself to her readers, some of whom might be on the fence toward the gun issue.
    Check out the Free State Project

    How does the economy really work? Mises Institute

    Laissez Faire Books offers an extensive collection of books on liberty, free markets, philosophy, economics, politics and history.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array Sky Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Lorain County, Ohio
    Posts
    865
    I am a great believer in experience.
    I experienced great personal harm as a defenseless child.
    As a police officer I saw the results of criminals preying on the defenseless, and on those who refused the ability to keep themselves safe.
    She may be happy, making herself vulnerable.
    I don't work that way.
    "Deine Papieren bitte?" or "ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ !"
    (Choose only one)
    NRA Endowment Member
    "I bark at no man's bid. I will never come and go, and fetch and carry, at the whistle of the great man in the White House no matter who he is." -- David Crockett

  13. #13
    Member Array mmwb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Western Wyoming
    Posts
    86
    "I realized I no longer needed a gun to feel powerful. If anything, my willingness to be vulnerable makes me stronger."

    Again a lack of differentiation between how one feels and how one is. My carrying does not make me feel more powerful, it doesn't even make me feel safer, it does gives me better, surer options to deal with danger though--should the need arise.

    She also mistakes the vulnerability as strength. She feels more courage than she used to. Courage is a fine trait (though can easily cross a line to fool hardiness) but I've never heard of it stopping a bullet or a blade... I guess I've never really seen courage as an absence of fear or anxiety, but the willingness to stand in the face of it. She as a false level of security based on a lack of bad experience and an ignorance of the real potential for harm...rather than real increased security based on an increased potential to deal with danger should it arise.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array TonyW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    791
    I do think that article does a good job of summing up some of the anti-gun people's feelings on the issue though.
    <a target="_top" href="http://www.cybernations.net/default.asp?Referrer=TonyW"><img src="http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd188/18932471/imgad2-1.png" border="0"></a>

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781
    ...When we borrowed the family car, I remembered to remove the pistol from the glove compartment, since my carry license was no longer active. We later realized there'd been another gun under the passenger seat all along — the semiautomatic that, at the time, my parents thought they'd lost...
    What the hell?!1

    Long term storage of handguns in a glove compartment and actually "losing" a firearm at all muchless it being under the seat.
    These are the kinds of poor and improper firearm ownership practices that make antis think we are all a bunch of yahoos playing fast & loose with our guns and the rules.

    Her parents might do well to have a friendly but serious talking to.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Female OCers of Virginia, article in British Marie Claire
    By paramedic70002 in forum Open Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: June 26th, 2010, 09:44 PM
  2. Guns At The Workplace Long Article But Worth It
    By HKinNY in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: September 24th, 2008, 12:54 AM
  3. Govt., securing their future -- long article
    By ibez in forum The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: January 3rd, 2008, 11:16 PM
  4. ...Rally Around S.C. Teen Who Killed Grandparents...(long article)
    By RETSUPT99 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 9th, 2007, 01:01 AM
  5. ...Rally Around S.C. Teen Who Killed Grandparents...(long article)
    By RETSUPT99 in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 8th, 2007, 09:00 PM

Search tags for this page

marie claire gun articles

,

marie claire open carry article

,

msn.marie

,

my boyfriend is pro gun

,

pro gun lady

,

pro guns article

,

texas new york concealed carry gun barbeque coney island

Click on a term to search for related topics.