Negligent/Accidental Discharges?

This is a discussion on Negligent/Accidental Discharges? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I've only had 1 ND/AD in 30 years of handling firearms and to this day I can't tell you what happened. I had a Series ...

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Thread: Negligent/Accidental Discharges?

  1. #16
    Member Array Mike from Texas's Avatar
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    I've only had 1 ND/AD in 30 years of handling firearms and to this day I can't tell you what happened. I had a Series 70 Colt Combat Commander that I kept in my truck. I was sitting in the truck, dropped the mag, reinserted it and slammed it home and BOOM!. I was so shocked at what just happened it took me a minute to get my wits about me and secure that weapon. Only thing I can figure is I has the slide safety disengaged and apparently my finger in the trigger guard.

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  3. #17
    Member Array Griblik's Avatar
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    I realize it's an irrational fear, the "spontaneous discharge situation", but it's more of a nightmare situation then anything else. Sounds like everybody's weighing in that 99.99% of ND/AD are human error, and we can at least take comfort that through diligence, that can be avoided, and The Golden Rule is in place for that other 0.01%. Thanks for the feedback, everybody.
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  4. #18
    Member Array whamonkey's Avatar
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    My plan is to never have a ND......

    I'm going with that.

  5. #19
    Member Array Intentional Flincher's Avatar
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    To me, the first rule of gun safety is "keep you finger out of the trigger guard until you are ready to fire" If you are mindful of that, you will not have an ND. Cocked and Locked...no big deal. No trigger, no ND. To me, experience seems to be the enemy with a lot of shooters. They know the rules. They know their weapons. But they get in the habit of doing things right, which can be good, but they are often not actively thinking about what they are doing.
    Glocks are EXCELLENT pistols, but I don't care for a gun that I have to pull the trigger to take down. That's my hang up. Simply put, if you follow the 4 rules, you won't have an ND.
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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array cagueits's Avatar
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    People, keep the damn thing pointed in a safe direction at all times. If your firearm discharges, due to either a mechanical malfunction or an operator error, you'll live to tell us about it and hopefully don't kill anyone in the process.

  7. #21
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    Nope

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array Tom G's Avatar
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    I had a friend who had an AD with a 30/06 while feedind a round. It was a Mouser Mark 5 and the bolt was kind of sloppy. He said he was sitting on the bed and was cycling reloaded ammo through it to check for feed problems and as he started to close and lock the bolt it went off. The slug went all the way through the roof and caused a leak the next time it rained. Needless to say his wife wasn't too happy about the wet bed. He got rid of the gun due to the sloppy fit of the bolt.
    Last edited by Tom G; May 22nd, 2007 at 07:22 PM.

  9. #23
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    It's a FINGER thing...never give your gun 'the finger' without following the 'four rules'...

    The finger is the key...a finger with muscle memory...the finger, the finger, the finger, and then the finger...

    Did I mention the importance of one's finger?

    OMO

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  10. #24
    Member Array knpjdad's Avatar
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    Sorry no story here.... 30+ of firearms, 1000's of rounds downrange, and not 1 ND... I'm hoping to keep it like that for the next 30 years!

    Be Safe!
    I wear a seatbelt, but I hope to never need it, I use smoke detectors in my house, but I hope to never need them, I carry life insurance, but I hope to never need it, I carry a weapon, but I hope to never need it.

  11. #25
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Only one so far and that was on the paper! Years ago visiting a summer camp I went to as a kid. I was on the rifle range and decided to try out a "shooter" they had acquired. I believe it was a Martini action or something similar. As I operated the lever to close the breech I heard a shot! As I was the only one on the firing line I figured it was a safe bet it came from the rifle in my hands. I rotated the rifle to check where my fingers were and they were all outside the guard! I looked down range and there was a little hole in the white part of my target at about five o'clock and about half an inch from the edge of the paper. Salvadore ( the range master ) and I immediately stripped the rifle and were amazed at how much crap fell out! It seems the rifle hadn't been cleaned other than the bore since they picked it up used, and god only knows when before that!

  12. #26
    Member Array kd5nrh's Avatar
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    I've also had rifles with adjustable triggers that would occasionally self-adjust themselves to the point of either firing on bolt closing or some random amount of time thereafter, even sitting in a rest undisturbed.

    All properly downrange or into the dirt so far, though.

  13. #27
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Intentional Flincher View Post
    Glocks are EXCELLENT pistols, but I don't care for a gun that I have to pull the trigger to take down. That's my hang up. Simply put, if you follow the 4 rules, you won't have an ND.

    But here's my question:

    Would you ever take down your personal preference gun without first dropping the magazine and then opening the slide to verify an empty chamber?

    Of course not.

    So that realization makes the fact that you have to pull the trigger before taking down a GLOCK moot. What's so worrisome about pulling the trigger on a gun you have just verified is empty? How does it differ from, say, dry-firing any gun?

    We still come around to the idea that it's inexcusable to pull the trigger to begin taking down the GLOCK -- or any gun -- without first having done the standard (and I do mean standard) drill of drop mag, open action, verify empty.

  14. #28
    Member Array Intentional Flincher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peacefuljeffrey View Post
    But here's my question:

    Would you ever take down your personal preference gun without first dropping the magazine and then opening the slide to verify an empty chamber?

    Of course not.

    So that realization makes the fact that you have to pull the trigger before taking down a GLOCK moot. What's so worrisome about pulling the trigger on a gun you have just verified is empty? How does it differ from, say, dry-firing any gun?

    We still come around to the idea that it's inexcusable to pull the trigger to begin taking down the GLOCK -- or any gun -- without first having done the standard (and I do mean standard) drill of drop mag, open action, verify empty.
    Re-read my post. I say that I advocate keeping your finger off the trigger. I feel strongly about this. I say that I think Glocks are excellent guns, but I don't care for the fact that I have to pull the trigger to take them down. To me, taking down a Glock involves breaking one of the 4 golden rules. I even said That's my hang up* Is it a design flaw? No. Is it one more thing that has contributed to people getting hurt? Yes.

    * hang-up /ˈhæŋˌʌp/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[hang-uhp] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
    –noun Slang.
    1. a preoccupation, fixation, or psychological block; complex: His hang-up is trying to outdo his brother.
    A witty saying proves nothing.

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  15. #29
    Member Array kikr's Avatar
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    I disagree with the "not if but when" statement. I'm 35 years old, and have had loaded weapons within arms reach since I was 6 and have carried on my person everyday since I was 18 and have never had a negligent discharge. Notice I didn't use the word accidental, I don't believe in accidents.

    I have had the displeasure of witnessing a few though. The most memorable was while I was in the Navy. We were in a conference room conducting a debrief about an investigation we were conducting. One of the NIS Agents decided to break down his weapon ( a 1st generation Glock 17). He pulled the weapon from his holster, cleared the chamber, dropped the magazine, depressed the takedown levers while pressing on the muzzle of the gun with his palm, and put a 115 gr JHP round through his hand. Another also happened while in the Navy when one of my patrolmen put a round of double ought buck through the floor board of the van during a bank run.

    They happen, but it's always following a breech of protocol in weapons handling.
    We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.
    George Orwell

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