"My daddy carries a gun..." - Page 2

"My daddy carries a gun..."

This is a discussion on "My daddy carries a gun..." within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I shot first when I was 7 I think. Dad wasnt into guns much but I pushed the issue when i was a teen and ...

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Thread: "My daddy carries a gun..."

  1. #16
    New Member Array Chuckdvc's Avatar
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    I shot first when I was 7 I think. Dad wasnt into guns much but I pushed the issue when i was a teen and got us both into reloading and shooting.
    He had that old Kentucky mentality that a gun was just another tool. He bought me my first 45 when i was 16 and he let me carry it in my car. I was responsible and independent. We lived in Los Angeles at the time and lived by the rule "rather be tried by 12 than carried by 6".

    I started teaching my boys at 3. I am a firm believer that allowing them to shoot and handle removes the curiosity that gets so many killed accidently. My boys started shooting USPSA competition at 12 and are now 15 and 17. I dont hide guns from them, never have. They also know they are expected to step up in defense of our home and family if I am not home or disabled.


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris17404 View Post
    Hi all,

    I'm the father of two small children aged 6 and 4. While they know their daddy enjoys shooting guns, and they know I store them safely in the house, they do not know that I carry one concealed. I keep all of my carry guns loaded, but locked in a quick-access safe, of which they do not know the location.

    I'd like to ask for your suggestions/experience on a few things:

    1. At what age did you let your children know that you carry? I current don't plan on telling until at least their late teens, if not later. It is more of a judgement call as to their maturity level?

    2. Did your kids ever find out that you carry before you intended them to know? At what age did they find out, and what did you do to handle it? While I wouldn't necessarily mind neighbors, etc knowing I carry, my decision to do so was a private one, and I wouldn't want one of children balbbing about it to everyone they meet, ya know?

    3. When you did tell them you carry, how did you discuss it with them?

    4. My childen have already watched the NRA's Eddie Eagle video on gun safety which they really liked, and have already memorized the jingle for what to do when they encounter a gun: "Stop, don't touch, leave the area, tell an adult." At what age do you feel it's appropriate to give them their first practical experience with firearms, i.e. holding them, teaching them about how they operate, maintenance, and finally actually shooting? What type of gun do you recommend for a first shooting experience?

    Please feel free to relate any other child-related firearm/concealed carry issues you would like to share.

    Thanks a lot.

    Chris
    My wife and I have 5 children. Our oldest son is 16, next oldest is our daughter who is 12, another son who is 11 and 5 year old twin boys. All know that my wife and I carry a gun and they all know why we carry guns.

    We never really told them we carry. By that I mean, there was never a time when we set them down, together or individually, and made the statement that we carry. We just never hid it from them. They all know that I carry every waking moment unless it is against the law to do so. I carry around the house. My wife always conceals but I carry openly the majority of the time during the spring and summer months.

    They have never blurted out anything about the guns to strangers or anyone for that matter. I believe this is because the fact that there are guns in our home, in a safe in our bedroom unless they are being carried, and that Mom and Dad always carry is so normal to them that it isn't even something that registers as cool to tell anyone. It really is 100% normal to them. I have been asked by the twins why some people are NOT carrying and when we told them that not everyone chooses to carry a gun to protect themselves, they were confused and had a hard time understanding why someone would not carry.

    All of our kids have shot from a very early age. No later than 6 years old. The twins just shot a single shot bolt action .22 rifle for the first time last month. Previously to that, it was just red rider BB guns. They felt like such "big boys" to shoot a real gun. They were very proud of themselves and still have the targets taped to their bed foot boards they are so proud.

    Train them early and train them well. Remove the mystery and tabooness of guns and they will not see them as something cool to mess with when Dad isn't around because he said they couldn't.
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  3. #18
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    I learned Dad carried at 16, although he only carryed VERY occasionally. I found out when we had to go somewhere after someone had threatened him. I knew both he and mom had their permits but this is the first time I actually knew he was, he carried a J frame SOB and nobody knew when he had it.
    Mark

    "The world is filled with violence. Because criminals carry guns, we decent law-abiding citizens should also have guns. Otherwise they will win and the decent people will lose."

    -James Earl Jones

  4. #19
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    My kids were 7 and 8. I explained why I carried and that they need to not tell anyone about it. So far , they have done extremely well. They are now 10 and 12. I found rationally explained the reasons I carry went a long way in getting them to understand the importance of keeping my carry a secret.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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  5. #20
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sig P239 View Post

    Train them early and train them well. Remove the mystery and tabooness of guns and they will not see them as something cool to mess with when Dad isn't around because he said they couldn't.
    My wife was brought up around a lot of guns (I was brought up in England so her experiences are just a little bit more relevant than mine).
    Her Dad told her that any time she wanted to look at or hold the unloaded guns all she had to do was ask, this was at the earliest age, he wanted to make guns commonplace, almost boring, to her naturally inquisitive mind.

    It worked. She never had 'the accident' and grew up loving guns. Mike, you're doing it absolutely the right way.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Array Shadowsbane's Avatar
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    My father never carried (well carried legally anyway) However firearms were common place for my siblings and I

    First weapon we "learned with" was a 22 bolt action rifle. That was really for about 3 shots each. After my father realized we were not scared of that he moved us up to the 1903 springfield (his deer gun) I believe this was at age 5 or 6. We shot prone and with the gun resting on a tree stump. First pistol I shot was a 45 revolver.(I think) That was about 8 or 9. All of us children were taught the power of the weapons and to never touch them without our father around (mom is scared of them,but understands their necessity), as they were not toys. As an added security measure my mother made sure we never had a toy gun to play with, on the grounds that no toy should ever look like a gun, and nothing looking like a gun should be pointed at her children.

    Any suggestion I would give has already been stated, most notably to not hide it from them. I know when I was a kid, if I thought my parents could be hiding something that became my mission to find out what, and no amount of beatings would stop me from multiple attempts.
    Now, we must all fear evil men. But there is another kind of evil which we must fear most, and that is the indifference of good men.

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  7. #22
    Senior Member Array rachilders's Avatar
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    1. At what age did you let your children know that you carry? I current don't plan on telling until at least their late teens, if not later. It is more of a judgement call as to their maturity level?

    When they began to ask about the guns my wife and I always keep our cars... around the age of 6-7.

    2. Did your kids ever find out that you carry before you intended them to know? At what age did they find out, and what did you do to handle it? While I wouldn't necessarily mind neighbors, etc knowing I carry, my decision to do so was a private one, and I wouldn't want one of children balbbing about it to everyone they meet, ya know?

    Same anwer as for #1 above for the most part. They have been exposed to guns since around age five, going with my wife and I to our gun club now and then. They also know I have guns in the house, where they are locked and what they need to do if they ever find a gun ANYPLACE other than in my (or their mothers) hands or not locked away. I have also discussed with my youngest - 8-year-old triplet boys - that owning or using guns is perfectly normal, but it's something that we should only discuss with family since sometimes other people become "scared" when you talk about guns around them. My older kids are adults, know I have a license and have no problem with it. In fact one of my older sons and my wife ALSO have carry permits.

    3. When you did tell them you carry, how did you discuss it with them?

    Refer to question/answer #2.

    4. My childen have already watched the NRA's Eddie Eagle video on gun safety which they really liked, and have already memorized the jingle for what to do when they encounter a gun: "Stop, don't touch, leave the area, tell an adult." At what age do you feel it's appropriate to give them their first practical experience with firearms, i.e. holding them, teaching them about how they operate, maintenance, and finally actually shooting? What type of gun do you recommend for a first shooting experience?

    My kids all got their first experience around the age of 7 or 8, that includes my five sons and my daughter. Their first practical (hands on) experience was with a .22 rifle. My three youngest (the triplets) have also shot .22 rifles and BB guns through the cub/boy scouts. In fact, their mother and I are both scout archery and rifle range safety officers.
    Last edited by rachilders; June 1st, 2007 at 01:33 AM.
    "... Americans... we want a safe home, to keep the money we make and shoot bad guys." -- Denny Crane

  8. #23
    Member Array passtheammo's Avatar
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    While I only have a 1 year old daughter, I often ask friends and co-workers how they go about teaching their children.

    A co-worker tells me how he can leave a rifle propped up in the corner of his house, and not one of his 5 children under the age of 10 will touch it.

    Since they were old enough to walk, he has left an unloaded BB gun propped in the corner of the living room. At any point in time, since their walking age, he has scolded them for attempting to grab the gun.

    Most folks won't admit that a 1-2 year old knows what 'NO' means. But my co-worker knows the truth. Even now he has complete trust in his kids from them being around, and firing his rifles under his attention, and them knowing the "rules".

  9. #24
    Ex Member Array HOLYROLLER's Avatar
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    passtheammo...Amen brother! Child-training is the key.

  10. #25
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0.02 View Post
    Mike, you're doing it absolutely the right way.
    Thanks 0.02, we think we are doing a pretty good job of raising them up right.

    I am surprised sometimes when this happens but it is not uncommon for us to be at a restaurant and have some stop by our table as they are leaving and tell us that we have the most well behaved and polite kids they can remember seeing. It makes us feel good as parents, it makes the kids feel good about their conduct and it confirms to us that we are doing a good job being parents. It's all about setting limits and sticking to them. Kids want to have limits. It is the ones who are never taught right from wrong that turn out to be mental cases and have so many problems. I can point to several in our neighborhood that fall into that category and every one of them come from a single Mother home with no father figure. It isn't always the case but, having a Mom and a Dad, I think, is a huge part of a child's healthy development. Our next door neighbors, or as we call them "The Hell Family" is a prime example. 9 kids and one Mother. And none of the kids share the same father.....need I say more?

    But that is just my opinion. Others may not agree.
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  11. #26
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    Guns have always been part of our/their lives. They've helped me reload since forever. When Kylie was 5 she shot my replica Win. '94 in .44WCF. Alexa did not shoot till she was 8 and that was a Colt MKIV S70 .45. I never told them I carry. I just did. I always told them that Daddy's guns are nobody's business and they were not to talk about it at school or anywhere else.

    One day while removing my cover shirt, Alexa saw my pistol and said, "Daddy, did you carry that to the store?" To which I replied, "I always have a gun on me, except when I go to work or to the school." Since guns are part of everyday, it was a non-issue.

    I did tell them to NEVER say, "Shoot 'em Daddy." If we're ever in a bad situtation. I reminded them once again that my guns are my business and I'll use them when and if I choose. They're to keep their mouths shut.

    Keep an open dialogue with your kids. Never blow them off when they come home from school and you will be amazed at the stuff they tell you. Then you have the opportunity to deprogram the bull the schools feed them. My girls know that guns are NOT bad and there may come a day when Daddy's gun is the only thing that stands between then and the bad guy.
    'The assailant chooses the time, location and method of attack.

    Since they are unlikely to let you know ahead of time when, where and how violent they're going to be, you should always be prepared.' - matiki

  12. #27
    Member Array clt46910's Avatar
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    In my household, my nine year old daughter does know I carry and why. She has never know me not to carry. I do not make a big deal out of it, she sees in just as part of our life. Kind of like Dad drives the car. Dad carries a gun. She also knows we do not tell people.

    Like others, I believe each child is different and you, as the parent, has to decide how to approach this. It will depend on the maturity and trust level you have with your child.

    I know I really laugh when we are getting ready to leave the house and are going through our checklist before we leave the house. My nine year old daughter will ask "Dad, you got your gun? You got your drivers license and carry permit?" "Dad, did you remember to put the extra mags in the holder this time?"( have left the house with a empty mag holder before)...LOL

    Carrying a firearm around here is just part of normal everyday life.

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array SammyIamToday's Avatar
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    Imo, education and forwardness will trump waiting and hiding.

    As a child was there anything that your parents could really hide from you?
    ...He suggested that "every American citizen" should own a rifle and train with it on firing ranges "at every courthouse." -Chesty Puller

  14. #29
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    Post

    Chris....
    I will preface this with the fact I have two boys, 10 and 4...so our situations are similar...

    1. At what age did you let your children know that you carry?

    Answer: Oldest boy--since I started carrying 3 years ago (he was 6-7)--he was very curious. Youngest boy--hasn't noticed, but concentrates on Thomas the Tank Engine and his cars. Both boys are familiar with my firearms and know to get an adult whenever they see one out. Oldest has his own Walther P22--secured in my safe.

    2. Did your kids ever find out that you carry before you intended them to know? At what age did they find out, and what did you do to handle it?

    Answer: I explained to the oldest--"We don't discuss Daddy's carrying with anyone. It's not your business to discuss and no one's business when I carry. Your answer if someone asks--'Go ask my Dad if he has guns'." I find it's better to give them an answer versus them trying to make one up.

    3. When you did tell them you carry, how did you discuss it with them?

    Answer: See #1. I explained I carry for their protection because police can't be everywhere all of the time. My 10 yr old is pretty astute--watches the news and asks questions. During the VA Tech saga, he asked, "how come no one there had a gun with them?"

    4. My childen have already watched the NRA's Eddie Eagle video on gun safety which they really liked, and have already memorized the jingle for what to do when they encounter a gun: "Stop, don't touch, leave the area, tell an adult." At what age do you feel it's appropriate to give them their first practical experience with firearms, i.e. holding them, teaching them about how they operate, maintenance, and finally actually shooting? What type of gun do you recommend for a first shooting experience?

    Answer: I gave both of my boys the opportunity to hold, touch, and look all of my (unloaded) guns when they were 3. Whenever I'm cleaning them, they watch and "help" clean magazines. So far, I've taken away the curiosity of "the guns". In fact, will ask them if they want to see them--and give them the opportunity that if they ask, I will show them. This DOES NOT APPLY with their friends--i.e. the oldest knows not to ask me in front of his friends. That will equal punishment. My concern is that kids will talk and not only will the parents potentially freak out, but some less than honorable punks will know I have guns in the house. See #2.

    IRT what gun to shoot first--I actually picked the Browning Buckmark as my son's first gun, but he had difficulty holding it up, unless resting on a sandbag. Instead, he picked the Walther as it was easier for him to hold and had easier access to the controls. He went through a brick of .22 yesterday and had a big smile all day.

    My 2 cents

    Mike

  15. #30
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    My daughter is 10, soon to be 11. And she is well aware that I carry. She also understands that its is nobody else's business and not to tell anyone.

    More importantly she know what "run and hide" means. The last thing I want in a situation where I have to draw my gun is my daughter jumping on me and clinging on for safety. So we have talked in great length about what to do if I bark the order "run" or "hide". She knows the difference between cover and concealment and she knows not to come out of hiding unless its me or a police officer calling her name. She also knows how to call 911 on her cell phone and that they will not know where she and that she must provide them her location.

    Now I understand that this is awkward conversation to have with your kids. I also understand that under stress half of what we have talked about will probably go out the window, but if she remembers even half she and I are both better off and better prepared. I have also begun to introduce practice. We will be out and about and will ask her questions like "How would describe where you are now to 911" or "If I said run right now where would you go", "well what if the bad guy is coming from that direction, then what"

    Now she is 10, and I do get a lot of the "what ever dad" talk, but I know that some of it is sinking in. And I am not using fear either, I am simply talking to her like I am stating fact and this is how things work, I do however stress it is important.

    IMO, YMMV
    "You can't shake the devils hand and say you were only kidding"

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