My g/f's kid sleepwalks

This is a discussion on My g/f's kid sleepwalks within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Last night i noticed something, my g/f's 8 year old sleepwalks. I was awoken around 3am to banging in the living room, so i grab ...

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Thread: My g/f's kid sleepwalks

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    Member Array GotSig?'s Avatar
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    Question My g/f's kid sleepwalks

    Last night i noticed something, my g/f's 8 year old sleepwalks. I was awoken around 3am to banging in the living room, so i grab my sig and flashlight, and head in there. There he was, banging into stuff and walking around hunched down like a little troll. It scared the **** out of me at first, i was thinking theres some little creature in my house. So i go get my g/f and ask how to deal with this, i heard your not suppoed to wake someone up in that state. She handled it but it left me thinking, This is going to sound horrible, but i had a bead on him and was ready to shot before i hit him with the flashlight. How am i supposed to keep the house secure and know if something is wrong if i have a kid that sleepwalks. Any suggestions would be great, im stuck here scratching my head.
    كافر(Infidel)
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    Member Array HRnTX's Avatar
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    I had a college roommate that sleep walks. It was really messed up. It was not uncommon to find him outside and we would wake him up and he would have no clue how he got outside. I have no idea how you try to secure a house with a sleepwalker inside. I would be tempted to lock them in their room, but there are way to many downsides to that. Good luck. Any current or former sleep walkers on this forum with some advice?

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    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    IIRC there are fire codes against bedrooms being locked or blocked from the outside. Check your own community codes to be sure.
    What I would do though is setup a cheap 'alarm' system in front of his bedroom door. Something as inexpensive as a bell or small but noisy wind chimes mounted or hung above the door at the door frame.
    When the door opens it strikes the bell causing a ding to go off and alert you with it's unique sound that the kid is on the stroll again.

    - Janq
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    Member Array mchasal's Avatar
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    Wow, it must have been scary to realize that you were pointing your pistol at him.

    I'd have to say you pretty much did the right thing though. You id'd the target with the light before firing. You might try keeping the Sig at a low ready and hit the target with the light first. It would slow things down slightly if it is actually a BG, but I think it's worth avoiding covering a loved one with the muzzle.

    Depending on the house layout, maybe locating the kid should be a first priority before investigating the noise. If you check his room and see that he's in bed, you can proceed in a more aggressive manner, and if he's not, you can be extra cautious. Of course, usually disclaimers about not trying to clear your house alone apply.

    And one final option:

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    The alarm idea on the door sounds like a good solution to me. It might also wake him up when he opens the door. No matter what, you'll have a heads up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mchasal View Post
    Wow, it must have been scary to realize that you were pointing your pistol at him.

    And one final option:

    When my wife feels a shopping spree coming on...

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    They do make an alarm that goes off when someone leaves a room...

    This could alert you to a sleepwalker!

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    Member Array GotSig?'s Avatar
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    Those restraints are great, i would love to do that but my g/f wouldn't like it to much. The alarm idea is great, i actually have el cheapo alarms on all my windows and doors that go off when you open them, i can just put one of those on his door. Or maybe one of those pepper spray bomb things so that when he opens the door he gets blasted by OC. I think maybe 2-3 times at the most and he won't sleepwalk anymore
    كافر(Infidel)
    He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
    Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, Aphorism 146
    German philosopher (1844 - 1900)

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    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
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    My nephew sleep walks; and when he stays with us, in addition to locking the doors, we have our house alarm on at night.

    Might I recommend, unless you believe your house is under siege, ID your target before "getting a bead" on it.

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    VIP Member Array Blackeagle's Avatar
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    Target identification is a must! If there are other people who are allowed to be in your house and you're not sure they're safe in bed you always need to hit the target with a flashlight before hitting it with a bullet.

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    Senior Member Array LoveLeather's Avatar
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    Bed restraints? I though those were date kits...I better check my local laws.

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    A cheap door alarm seems like the best option. Also target ID before aiming is the best practice.
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    Senior Member Array A1C Lickey's Avatar
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    I seem to remember dealing with someone who sleep walked and from experience an alarm won't neccesarily work. If they're normally heavy sleepers who it takes a determined effort to wake up, they're going to be just as hard to wake up when sleep walking. What we did was to double check all the door locks at night and move the indivuals room down to the first floor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    What I would do though is setup a cheap 'alarm' system in front of his bedroom door. Something as inexpensive as a bell or small but noisy wind chimes mounted or hung above the door at the door frame.
    When the door opens it strikes the bell causing a ding to go off and alert you with it's unique sound that the kid is on the stroll again.

    - Janq
    My little brother used to sleep walk and we had a bell, like the ones that used to ring when you walked into a country store, and it woke him up whenever he left his room.

    Wind chimes would work as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    What I would do though is setup a cheap 'alarm' system in front of his bedroom door. Something as inexpensive as a bell or small but noisy wind chimes mounted or hung above the door at the door frame.
    When the door opens it strikes the bell causing a ding to go off and alert you with it's unique sound that the kid is on the stroll again.

    - Janq
    Excellent idea - make sure its loud enough to wake you both.



    Quote Originally Posted by mchasal View Post

    Depending on the house layout, maybe locating the kid should be a first priority before investigating the noise. If you check his room and see that he's in bed, you can proceed in a more aggressive manner, and if he's not, you can be extra cautious. Of course, usually disclaimers about not trying to clear your house alone apply.
    Another good idea.........

    And then this one............

    And one final option:


    This is probably a "Not" so good idea.

    As a former and extremely active sleepwalker between the ages of about 5 to about 15. I'd offer up the following from personal experience:

    Sleepwalkers have EXTREME disorientation. They do not know what they are doing, where they are, who they are, and any other facts about what is happening. As awoken, limited understanding of the events dissipates.

    Sleepwalkers are very very unpredictable. The behavior is totally irrational and inexplicable.

    Sleepwalking, to me, was typically an extension of a vivid dream sequence . Unfortunately, the part of my brain that was supposed to "turn off" or "shut down" my motor skills and muscle reactions failed to do so. Maybe a hormonal deal, or just some "wiring" that wasn't finished yet.......Many of my dreams were the typical "running in slow motion" from Zombies or the like - but I would actually be walking or running, not only through the house, but even outside many times. Up and down stairs, through open or closed doors, out locked doors, into front yards, into back yards..............

    Extreme confusion accompanies sleepwalking. When I was awoken, I was scared, confused, and disoriented. Occasionally I was absolutely terrified of something. I would be placed back in bed, and typically feel asleep quickly. At times, however, the walking was accompanied by "Night Terrors" - deepseated terrors of something unknown and not understood that might take, literally an hour, to overcome. At times, as my parents would "catch up" with me, they'd would enter my dream sequence as "zombies" and thus terrify me even more - it is very very unpredictable what a sleepwalker may do.

    Restraints, IMHO, could be dangerous due to thrashing, fighting and the attendent bruises or worse. Explain that to CPS........

    I would immediately have deadbolts installed on all outside doors - double keyed - so that it takes a key to unlock the door from the inside or the outside. I am proof that any other lock is a momentary challenge at best, and easily unlocked by an active sleepwalker.

    I am sure that in todays age many resources are available to understand and help you. Start with the sleepwalking, but be ready to move on to night terrors if needed.

    Our son suffered from the night terrors. Inconsolable terror and fears accompanied by tears, grief and emotional and physical exhaustion.

    The good news is most young'uns outgrow the challenge. Sleepwalking, for me, probably "peaked" around the age of 11 or 12, with occasional episodes later in life, maybe into the mid 20's. I've usually had very vivid dreams, even later in life. I've grow up to be pretty OK, other than being a tax code geek that likes guns, and my son graduated with a photography degree and is gainfully employed and married. He's OK other than his parents are kind of crazy.......

    Anyway, good luck. Be REAL CAREFUL with that pistol - you might want to consider alternatives to that until the young'uns stabilized - but you never know - so be careful anyway. You may want to even consider a code or fingerprint keyed safe due to the unpredictability of sleepwalkers. Good luck!

    Edited to Add: As flmitchell noted - this looks pretty good too:
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