Muscle memory and repetitive actions.

This is a discussion on Muscle memory and repetitive actions. within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am a big fan of the muscle memory thing. i work on a kind of production line and every day I make sure that ...

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Thread: Muscle memory and repetitive actions.

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
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    I am a big fan of the muscle memory thing. i work on a kind of production line and every day I make sure that everything is in the same exact place. I can almost do my job without looking. I feel that this helps me to work faster and more efficiently.

    I also use this principle for my carrying habits. I decided early on that I was going to get every gun I have as close as possible to being the same as each other. I have three Glocks. A full sized, compact and sub-compact. They are all the same calibre. I have the same sights on all of them. Heck, I even switched out the serrated, target trigger on the compact and sub for the smooth trigger that comes on the full sized that I like better. I also use the same type of holster for all of them. The only thing different about them is the size. I can pick up any one of them and not have to worry about something not being where it is supposed to be or what sight picture I am going to get. If the shot is a longer shot that needs a sight picture that is. The draw is the same. As is the re-holstering.

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  3. #17
    Distinguished Member Array fed_wif_a_sig's Avatar
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    Ya but OPFOR just think....your RTO didnt hurt as much when he got the rabies shots because his leg was killing him, LOL.

    Couldnt resist bro.....oh and lay off them steaks.
    Steve
    "Respect all ... Fear none!!!

  4. #18
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    I agree with fed_wif_a_sig & cockedlocked01.

    I also think that were muscle memory really has a critical importance is performing reloads and immediate action or stoppage drills such as "tap, rack, bang" or "tap, rack, "click", reload, rack, bang"

    Those are some critical areas where having it perfected and into muscle memory is very important if not critical.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  5. #19
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    I disagree whole heartedly. If you're carrying in different locations and different styles of weapons, you are inviting a mistake on your part that slows you down in getting your gun into the fight- or keeps you from ever getting it in the fight at all.

    I do carry different guns, but they all work the same. No safety, just point and click. I do use different holsters, but they all ride at about 3:30. If that option won't work with what I'm wearing, I'll change clothes. I won't go smaller than a compact (Sig 228 or Glock 23) but prefer a full size pistol. Sure, at times it is inconvienent, but it is worth it. If the zombies come, I won't be grabbing for my Glock at 3:00 only to remember it is at 5:30. And then, when I pull the trigger I won't be reminded that I have a 1911 and forgot to take the safety off.

    We can talk about how amazing the human brain is, or compare shooting to sports. But, until the golf balls start shooting at Tiger I don't think is ability to his a 2 iron stinger really relates to combat. In a SHTF situation you need to give yourself every advantage possible.
    "The only people I like besides my wife and children are Marines."
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  6. #20
    Member Array Harold Green's Avatar
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    Years ago, shortly after I’d started shooting IDPA, I was having trouble with both my speed and accuracy. After about six months of this, I was approached by one of the old hands who was a very good shooter. He asked me how long I was going to stay in the gun of the month club?

    At the time I was trying different guns from my collection each month because I wanted to be proficient with several different guns. He suggested that I should just pick one and stick with it, if I ever wanted to become competitive. I took his advice, and it worked.

    Since then, some friends and I organized a local practice group focused on developing defensive shooting skills. We hold monthly shoots where we simulate defensive encounters. We design these to put the person involved in the scenario under stress and make him have to think on his feet. He has to employ good tactics, good gun-handling skills, and react very quickly in order to successfully resolve the scenario.

    We’ve found that some very small variations from what an individual is used to can completely disrupt his ability to react quickly, decisively, and prevail in these simulations. One of the things I’ve observed that can do this is changing how you carry your gun or the type of gun you carry. I’ve seen folks who’ve made these kinds of changes, practiced with them and thought they were good to go, just completely shut down under stress, because they just couldn’t make things work. I don’t think you’d want to have this happen to you in a life-threatening situation.

    So, don’t just sit and speculate how well you THINK something might work after you practiced with it dry and on the square range a bit. Get together with some friends, set up some stress-inducing simulations, and find out. You might be surprised by what you learn.

    Personally, I carry the same gun the same way all the time. If that gun’s in the shop, I have one that’s almost identical to it that I use in its place. If I get in a life-threatening situation, I don’t want to play the “what am I carrying and how am I carrying it today” game. I want to be able to react instinctively without having to think about it. I want as much stuff as possible to just run on autopilot, because I’m probably going to be more than busy enough processing the situation and responding to it. YMMV.
    "A gentleman will seldom, if ever, need a pistol. However, if he does, he needs it very badly!" -- Sir Winston Churchill

    "He who goes unarmed in paradise had better be sure that is where he is." -- James Thurber

  7. #21
    Member Array kjdoski's Avatar
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    When I had a choice in carry weapons, I carried a G19 backed up by a G26. Primary carry was a Desantis Speed Scabbard OWB for the G19, or a no-name "slide" style holster (with similar cant) for the G26. That way, no matter what my clothing choice was, my primary pistol was in the same area on the belt, at the same height, and same cant - using the same manual of arms.

    On rare occasions, I would switch to the G26 IWB, backed up with a Kahr PM9 in the pocket - but the manual of arms remained the same, and the general location and cant of the primary didn't change much, despite some increase in "concealability"

    I guess I'm a guy that likes things consistent, for the reasons you mentioned...

    Regards,

    Kevin
    "Fast is fine, accuracy is final..."

  8. #22
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    A partially related caveat here ... while I favor consistency for myself and suggest it to others, I would always recommend all folks to have tried about everything they can lay hands on - to shoot, I am not thinking carry here.

    That means that if we sometime have a ''strange'' gun available in an emergency we should at least have the knowledge already how it operates. Includes revo's
    Chris - P95
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    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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  9. #23
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post

    That means that if we sometime have a ''strange'' gun available in an emergency we should at least have the knowledge already how it operates. Includes revo's
    That is a most excellent point, I rent guns I don't own at the range but even so I have a long list of guns I have never used.
    I am working on that.

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry View Post
    A partially related caveat here ... while I favor consistency for myself and suggest it to others, I would always recommend all folks to have tried about everything they can lay hands on - to shoot, I am not thinking carry here.

    That means that if we sometime have a ''strange'' gun available in an emergency we should at least have the knowledge already how it operates. Includes revo's
    I agree with that thought. One might have to use a "strange" gun for some reason and we should all try to have a basic knowledge of most brands. Working in a gun shop part time helps me with this as I can mess around with other types and see how they function.

    I can go even further with this and talk about reloading procedures that will that will work on all auto handguns verses using a method that will not, but that would start another war.

  11. #25
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    For example, I have never fired a FN FiveseveN, it sure looks the same as all the other guns I have used but until I know for sure I have a nagging doubt that if using one in an emergency I might fail to use it properly.

  12. #26
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    For example, I have never fired a FN FiveseveN
    Count me in for that one too Pete - as yet one of a few I have not had a chance to try. I need to also ''borrow'' a Deagle
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  13. #27
    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
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    Yeah. the FiveseveN is a decent gun. But, it's controls are in a strange place compared to most other brands.

  14. #28
    Senior Member Array kylebce's Avatar
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    I carry different platforms, but in the same type rig and on the strong hip at 3-4:00

    The biggest challenge I have is that I shoot Glock so much- when I change to Sig or 1911 my shots are low due to grip angle.


    Slow fire is no big deal. I do lean more to shoot lots but carry 1 type.

    You mentioned knives- I havent had a problem drawing a variety of knives, some are stiffer but mechanics are the same.
    G-23, 27, 35 (all .40)
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  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by fed_wif_a_sig View Post
    Ya but OPFOR just think....your RTO didnt hurt as much when he got the rabies shots because his leg was killing him, LOL.

    Couldnt resist bro.....oh and lay off them steaks.
    We brought the dog to the vets at Bagram - no rabies!

    But there's no way in heck I'm layin' off the steaks... Not much in the world beats a good churrascoria...
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  16. #30
    Ex Member Array Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylebce View Post

    You mentioned knives- I havent had a problem drawing a variety of knives, some are stiffer but mechanics are the same.
    On some knives the clip is inverted, meaning that when you go to open the blade the flipper or thumbstud isn't there, it's at the other end of the knife. I alternate knives between work and casual, my work knife is currently a Kershaw Needs Work and my casual is a SOG Twitch XL, neither allow me to move the clip and they are aligned so that I have to remember which is which.

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