Muscle memory and repetitive actions.

This is a discussion on Muscle memory and repetitive actions. within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I carry a SA XD40 on duty in a Safariland SLS holster. When I am just at the range, I carry in a cheap Don ...

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Thread: Muscle memory and repetitive actions.

  1. #31
    Member Array Taurus111's Avatar
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    muscle memory

    I carry a SA XD40 on duty in a Safariland SLS holster. When I am just at the range, I carry in a cheap Don Hume open top of some kind. During fast presentation drills, I find myself trying to find the little lever hook to open the hood so I can draw.
    Likewise, when I am in the Safariland, I put my hand down to draw the weapon, in the "watch your target, getting ready to go to cond. red mode", and like magic the hood is down. I don't remember how it got down, I just know it goes there. And when the gun goes back in, the hood "magically" goes back up. Muscle memory is not just a fad. It is the truth.
    If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.
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    http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/13226.htm

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  3. #32
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    It is a widely held belief that using the same gun in the same holster on a regular or permanent basis helps with muscle memory, that the action of drawing and operating the handgun becomes virtually automatic.

    I agree, but I am also of the opinion that it pays to be able to carry a variety of weapons in different holsters as there are circumstances that can dictate the need to being adaptive.
    • Your primary weapon might be too large for your cover clothing on any particular day.
    • Your primary weapon might be in for repair.
    • Your holster choice might be compromised due to clothing or conditions.


    I carry a variety of guns in different holsters, I also alternate between a few different folding knives that don't all open the same way.

    I don't feel that I suffer from lag or hesitation.
    I dry fire - I practice my draw - I make every effort to be fully cognizant of the weapon I am with, the idiosyncrasies of it and how best it handles.

    Anyone else a multi-carry weapon person?
    How do you feel about it?
    I agree with you Pete. I carry either the G23, the Sig P239 or the Taurus PT-111 (although the PT-111 is not really in the rotation too much anymore) and on occasions a revolver....so I carry several different guns. I find that I am equally comfortable with them all and have no problem switching back and forth.
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  4. #33
    Member Array Alien Nation's Avatar
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    I have carried over thirty differant handguns and over 20 differant holsters. I trained heavily with each one. I have no problem switching back and forth. Even through intense timed shooting drills I've not had a problem.
    “You come at me with a sword and with a spear. But I come at you in the name of the LORD of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the LORD will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you and take your head from you". 1 Samuel 17, 45-46
    Brian

  5. #34
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    Not to rain on anyone's parade, but IMO square range drills are no substitute for real experience here. No matter what artificial stress you put on yourself, at the end of the day you know that a drill is coming up, and as part of that drill you will be drawing and firing - so you are prepared to do just that. You have consciously thought about your weapon and your rig immediately before the drill began, so you are 1 million steps ahead of where you will be when a real situation develops immediately and without warning right in front of you.

    You can train all you want with your dozen different operating systems/carrying configurations...when the action explodes in front of your face, you will default to one option. I hope, for your sake, that it is the right one.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  6. #35
    Member Array Alien Nation's Avatar
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    You may very well be right. I generally(99.9% of the time) carry my XD .45 in an IWB at the 3:30-4:00 position. I guess I should also have said that I've always carried on my right hip. I'm down to owning one handgun these day's. I trained the way I did before because I needed to be familiar with handguns from all over the world at the time. Situations and cercumstances had a way of changing.
    “You come at me with a sword and with a spear. But I come at you in the name of the LORD of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the LORD will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you and take your head from you". 1 Samuel 17, 45-46
    Brian

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