Oh to have the Grandads back - Page 2

Oh to have the Grandads back

This is a discussion on Oh to have the Grandads back within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; My grandfather died when I was 5 or 6 so very few memories and a couple pictures. However, I heard many stories from my father ...

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Thread: Oh to have the Grandads back

  1. #16
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    My grandfather died when I was 5 or 6 so very few memories and a couple pictures. However, I heard many stories from my father about him and the folks of that generation.

    One story I remember about my grandfather and his friend. Back in the 1940's my grandfather owned a grocery store and next door was a drug store. The pharmacist and my grandfather were big game hunters who hunted in Alaska, Canada and even a trip to Africa. (remember seeing pictures of my grandpa with pics of moose, bear, cape buffalo he shot)

    The pharmacist kept one of his "elephant guns", a magnum O/U double rifle he hung on the wall for display in the drug store.

    One day my grandfathers grocery store was robbed. The 3 armed robbers herded my grandfather, employee's and customers into a walk-in cooler, locked them in and robbed the store. I believe they were in the cooler for something like 45 minutes or so before a customer found them. Well my grandfather was PO'd to say the least!

    Being the resourceful person he was... he installed a panic button that would ring a bell next door at the pharmacy that would alert his buddy if someone ever locked them in the cooler and robbed them again. My dad said, everyone laughed at him saying, what are the chances that someone is going to lock everyone in the cooler again during a robbery?

    Well, long story short, my dad said, almost a year to the day, the same 3 thugs pull the same type of robbery, herding everyone into the cooler again. My grandfather started ringing the buzzer like crazy and the pharmacist grabbed his double rifle from the wall and ran out into the back alley in time to see the guys jump into a car with the whole cash register and bags of groceries.

    As they were peeling out, the pharmacist leveled the rifle and shot once. The round went through the trunk, back seat, front seat, through the back of the driver, blew out his chest, and IIRC lodged in the engine block of their car. The car crashed into a phone pole in the back alley and one of the thugs fled and one just sat in the car screaming.

    My dad was in high school when that happened. He said it really shook up the pharmacist quite a bit and he never went hunting again after that.

    Of course back then it was legal to shoot "fleeing felons" and obviously no charges were brought against a fine upstanding member of the community.

    But I must say, I remember that story, and remember pictures of my grandfather posing with his friend dressed like Teddy Roosevelt, standing behind their game, and think back on yesterdays generation and the tuff old codgers that didn't take crap off of punks. I look back on my grandfather and men of that time and wonder what has happened to society today. BTW... my grandfathers store was never robbed again.

    That happened in the late 1940's at 10th & Central Ave. in Kansas City, Kansas.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    Chris too true , and I will encorage all here to take an opportunity that i missed Take a tape recorder with you and go talk to grandma/pa . Talk about family , life , the times , or nothing .. just talk and record Build a " living history " of the storys that normaly die with them . By the time i was convinced i need to do this Alsheimers made it pretty much pointless , and now i know what i can remember , not refer to . Take the time to do better for yourself and your family .
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  3. #18
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    Here's a Grand Grandpa Story for Ya'.

    My Grandpa ("Daddy Mac") was an avid shooter. One morning during a solo overnighter with him & my Grandmother ("Momma Mac") I awoke to discover a monsoon-like rainstorm would likely cancel any chances of shooting today. I was bummed. As an 8 year-old, my opportunities to shoot "real guns" with Daddy Mac were much anticipated & celebrated events. But my Grandpa had a plan...

    He waited until Momma Mac went shopping before he brought-out a Colt .22 autoloading pistol and a brick of ammo. We went out on the covered front porch & sat in the big oak bench-swing facing the country lane than ran in front of their house. We could see any traffic coming from a half-mile away in both directions. Without saying a word, Daddy Mac lit his pipe & loaded the Colt. Then he leaned back in the swing, squinted his eyes to focus on the front sight & touched-off a shot that TWHACKED against his mail box posted on the other side of the lane. Then two more shots, TWHACK...TWHACK as the little lead bullets echoed through the mailbox door & out the back into the post. Then he engaged the safety & handed to pistol to me! "You think you can hit that mailbox?" he asked. "Just look both ways down the lane before you shoot & make damn sure nobody's coming".

    I focused my attention on the sight picture and POW, missing the mailbox. "Here, straighten that right elbow & drop your chin over against the inside of your shoulder" he said, "Yeah...that's it. Now s-q-u-e-e-z-e that trigger". TWHACK-TWHACK two hits in rapid succession. I smiled sooo broadly that Daddy Mac roars with laughter, almost spitting out his pipe. So, with the rain pouring down, we take turns shooting holes in the mailbox. Clip after clip until the porch is covered with .22 hulls & the mailbox door is hanging by half a hinge while the other side swings freely at each impact. Just about the time we were running low on ammo & trying to find yet untouched metal at which to aim...a car came down the lane. Not just any car, it was Momma Mac!

    Daddy Mac says "Give me the pistol & be quiet. I'll do the talking". My Grandmother took a long, hard look at the swiss-cheesed object barely hanging from the post that used to be her mailbox as she turns into the driveway. With the rain still pouring down she gets out of the car & hurries up onto the porch. There we were, easily swinging back & forth, surrounded by hundreds of empty .22 hulls scattered everywhere, with puffs of smoke from Daddy Mac's pipe hanging in the humid air.

    "Crawford McNeely! What in this WORLD are you doing? That mailbox costs us $4.00 at the store & you've gone and SHOT it to PIECES!" my Grandmother heatedly asked. "Well Ruby", Daddy Mac casually responded, "I only had one Grandson to shoot with this morning & we've had a lot of fun shooting that thing to pieces. I recun' we can afford to go BUY another $4.00 mailbox. Would you like to try a shot or two?" and with that he held the pistol up toward my Grandmother's grasp. "Well, if y'all can sit here on that swing and shoot the day away...I guess I can too". She wiggled her Grandma-sized rearend between us on the swing & proceeded to miss her first two shots. I expertly instructed her to straighten her arm, tuck-in her chin & squeeze that trigger. TWHACK! We shot until we were out of ammo & laughed until it quit raining.

    Now, y'all can tell me the laws & rules of safety we broke that day over 40 years ago. You can take issue with Daddy Mac's pipe smoking or Momma Mac's kind understanding of our boyish prank. You can even mention how much $4 in 1965 is worth today. But you'll NEVER convince me that Crawford & Rubina McNeely aren't among the COOLEST Grandparents who ever lived. And that's the kind of Grandpa I'm DETERMINED to be!
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    Ghost :

    Fantastic story , thanks so much for sharing it , That is truely how it was ( and still is some places ) .
    Make sure you get full value out of today , Do something worthwhile, because what you do today will cost you one day off the rest of your life .
    We only begin to understand folks after we stop and think .

    Criminals are looking for victims, not opponents.

  5. #20
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    They don't make like they use to. Even going through the depression did not take the love of counrty out of them. True Americans who would be sick to see where we are at now.

    I am sad that my children did not get to meet their Great Grand Parents. I nnever met my Grand Father on my moms side. But I heard a lot of stories about him. He was a career military & and was not afraid or ashame to fight for the USA. He was a CWO in the Army travel quite a bit. In fact my parents met over sea at one of the bases.

    My other Grandfater who died in 1983 was a great man. He was one of the first to take me hunting & fishing. He didn't have much of a formal education, but man he sure taught me a lot about life.

  6. #21
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    Ghost - yes from me too - tears of laughter.

    You wrote that so well it was like seeing a video and indeed - those are moments that a grandkid will remember with a smile and much affection.

    Thank you for your time posting that - it is truly a taste of the ''good ol' days''.



    <chuckling still, 'seeing' that Swiss cheese mail box>
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  7. #22
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    I don't know...I think I'll feel lost if or really when I lose my grandfather. I don't see him as much as i'd like anymore, but I practically grew up with him (parents sent me down to see him for the summers so it was like living half and half between parents and grandparents). He's got such a one up on me on just general knowledge and wisdom all around. He enlisted in the military before Vietnam and ended up going, managed to survive Vietnam and ended up retiring as a Major (don't know when or how he got commissioned coming from being enlisted as he doesn't like to talk about it much). I think somehow he ended up flying both Helicopters and Planes while in service. He's one of those strange folks though. When he retired he still didn't think he knew enough so he went back to college. After getting a degree or specialization in one field...he just moved on to the next. He was still taking college courses into his 70's!!! So basically, he was a pilot(in two different types of aircraft), mathematics and biz degrees too I think, and I think all the others were at a community college and trade related like blacksmithing, welding, heating and air, automotive repair, etc... He finally stopped a couple of years ago. Sometimes I wish I had that kind of drive. I just don't. He doesn't show off either. He knows he's a genius, he knows he was a "hero", but doesn't tell anyone or try to show off. Hell, the only reason I found out he had any medals from the service was because I snuck into his room and found a bunch of them in a dusty old shoebox in his closet.

    You just don't see that in folks much anymore. They're a whole different breed.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

  8. #23
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    Thanks, this thread helps bring back some very good memories.

  9. #24
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    The generation that most of you are writing about was my Father's generation.

    If he was still alive he would be 96 now. Mom is 86 and doing well. As I grow older I see a lot of my Dad in me and try to be more and more like him everyday.

    The generation that lived through the depression was a truely remarkable generation. I don't think we will ever see their like again, I'm sorry to say. I will take what my Father taught me and try to emulate him and honor his memory.

    I have many memories of my Grandmother. She was the only one still alive by the time I was born. What a changing world she saw. Born in the 1890's and lived until the 1980's.

    Biker

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array mark555's Avatar
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    Great story Ghost. My Grandfathers were both good men, My Grandmothers (by all reports very wonderful women, had both died before I was born. Their second wives were less then wonderful and in one case she was a lot less then wonderful. I still remember the lessons the Grandpa’s taught me and use them all the time. People think I am nuts when I pick out water melons, but I have never had a bad one.
    "Hell of a thing, killin' a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
    - William Munny (Clint Eastwood in the Unfrogivin)

    “The graveyards are full of indispensable men.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

    “My Idea of a fair fight is beating baby seals with a club”

  11. #26
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    + 1 on wishing i could keep my granparents mine have been gone 10 years my grandfather was in the navy and i still have his metals.

    but what i remember most is his dedication to my grandma, how he never left her side during the day even when he could no longer take care of her and had to put her in a nursing home, it seemed that those two had a very special bond and he didnt last long after she was gone
    I had a lot of memories about him waking us up at 6.00 am with breakfast ready to take us fishing sure wish i could have one more day wth them!

  12. #27
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    Just goes to show that over the years social engineering has worked, and it has your average person fearing an inanimate object, sad but true...

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    Believe It or Not...

    Y'all have already met Crawford McNeely (Daddy Mac). My other Grandfather's name was Luck (Daddy Burt). Well, that wasn't his REAL name, but he was born at home & nobody in the family could read. So the first time anyone ever actually wrote down his name was his first day of school when he was about six years old. The oft-told family story goes that Daddy Burt disliked his given name so profoundly that when he was asked for his name to add to the school Roll Book...he changed it on-the-spot to "Luck" Burt. His hard-scrabble farming family was so poor that Dad Burt had to quit school in the 3rd Grade because his labor was needed back home at the farm so they could eat more "regularly". As a result, my Grandfather never learned to read until he was in his 30's and did so with the help of my Grandmother and the Daily Newspaper. You might think a fellow like that would be denied admission to the circles of wealth & power. Well, not Luck Burt. I CAN'T COUNT the number of U.S. Congressmen, Governors & State Representatives to whom I was introduced while they visited my Grandfather & Grandmother's farm. There are even photos of Harry & Bess Truman holding me as a baby when they stopped-by and visited once.

    Dad Burt told this story on himself while sitting around the breakfast table one morning just short of his 81st Birthday. Once, when he was in his 20's it seemed that everyone was getting jobs with the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) because there weren't jobs to be had anywhere else. He wanted seriously to join the CCC but was ashamed that he couldn't read & knew there would be a written application to fill-out. Always ready with a clever solution, he found some cotton bandages & ketchup. He wrapped his right hand in the bandage & applied ketchup in "just" the right spots. He then walked into the CCC office and found the cutest teenage girl he could spot working there. He walked up to her desk & explained that he was a fine carpenter but had slightly injured his hand that morning. He wanted to apply to the CCC but, because of the bandages, he couldn't hold a pencil. And, without missing a beat, smiled and asked this young woman if she would READ him the questions & WRITE down his answers? She said "of course!". He not only was hired by the CCC as a carpenter (having never sawed a board in his life)...but was later a Camp Supervisor in the building of Mammoth Cave National Park! And every paycheck he ever received, every farm he ever bought, every Driver License he was ever issued said "Luck Burt". He was lucky indeed.
    My favorite thing about BOTH of my Grandfathers is that they lived less than 3 miles from each other, only 40 miles from my parent's home so I got to visit them A LOT. And, as the youngest of three siblings, I didn't get married until I was 31. And BOTH of my Grandfathers lived long enough to hold & talk to my only son. Now THAT'S lucky!
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

  14. #29
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    Ghost - enjoyed that thank you.

    You were indeed very fortunate to be close enough to have spent a lotta time with both. You must undoubtedly have a book full of great memories.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
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    Oh, y'all are surely welcome. Having TWO complete CHARACTERS for Grandfathers make for a delightful childhood. Their humor, their wisdom, their patience & their selfless sense of family was a treat to enjoy when I was a child...and a benchmark reference now that I'm the Grandpa. I'm NOT bragging, but if EVERYONE had been fortunate enough to be a part of a family like mine? The world would be an ENTIRELY different place. Now it's MY responsibility to make sure my Grandchildren feel that same way when THEY look back on their lives from the perspective I have now.
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

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