Traffic Stops - Page 2

Traffic Stops

This is a discussion on Traffic Stops within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by houdini I just saw my nephew today who is a police officer and ask him the same ? HE said that he ...

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Thread: Traffic Stops

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by houdini View Post
    I just saw my nephew today who is a police officer and ask him the same ? HE said that he would rather know right away that you are carring then finding it when he does his search.
    I just want to know. CCW's who are legal will tell you, bad guys are the ones who don't. If you're legal all is fine with me and I really do appreciate the notification.

    I'll speak for most LEO and say we don't like the surprise of finding a gun unexpectedly. Ratchets things up a bit!
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  2. #17
    Senior Member Array A1C Lickey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SixBravo View Post
    In Arizona, their first question is *always* 'Are there any weapons in the car?'. You had better be telling the truth. It's the alternative to mandatory notification.
    And in AZ it is tied to your DL, but depending on which system that particular town/city/whatever uses, it might not show up.
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  3. #18
    Distinguished Member Array Stetson's Avatar
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    I tell the LEO anyways that way they know I am not trying to hide anything.Remember they generally deal with mostly negative stuff
    most of the time. It's always worked well for me.

  4. #19
    Member Array Smokewagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasGeezer View Post
    In Texas, when a LEO runs your driver's license, he'll know you have a CHL --- they are linked.

    And your vehicle registration is linked with your DL (I believe), so just running your plate as you drive down the street would therefore let him/here know you have a CHL.

    Word for the wise here is to telll the LEO you have a CHL and whether or not you are presently carrying.
    Vehicle registration is not linked to your DL in Texas. The name gathered from the registration can be run by a dispatcher for a DL check, hence the CHL will appear.
    "How a politician stands on the Second Amendment tells you how he or she views you as an individual... as a trustworthy and productive citizen, or as part of an unruly crowd that needs to be lorded, controlled, supervised, and taken care of." -- Rep. Suzanna Gratia Hupp (TX)

  5. #20
    Member Array DaveT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by semperfi.45 View Post
    I just want to know. CCW's who are legal will tell you, bad guys are the ones who don't. If you're legal all is fine with me and I really do appreciate the notification.

    I'll speak for most LEO and say we don't like the surprise of finding a gun unexpectedly. Ratchets things up a bit!
    +1 !!

    One way to think about this, and it is really very simple..... try to put yourselves in the Officer's shoes.

    Every time an Officer makes a traffic stop, he has no idea if the person(s) in the car are just someone in a hurry, have just robbed a store and really in a hurry, or someone who just killed their wife, husband, kids, etc. Think about that for a moment.... we all read and hear stories about those kind of people in the news just about every day. Many of them are apprehended by Police Officers in a traffic stop scenario.

    With that in mind, why not do everything possible to ease any kind of tension and to make life a little less stressful for those who make their living by potentially putting their lives on the line each and every day ?

    Put yourself in the officer's shoes, and you will soon realize that just about everything an Officer does is in some way tied in with his or her personal safety and wanting to make sure they go home to their families at night. From escorting someone out of a crowded store to talk outside, to disarming someone during a traffic stop.... it is all about OFFICER SAFETY.

    Just this morning alone, I have read posts on this board about refusing to give an Officer a last name, challenging an Officer's authority, civil disobedience, and carrying where it is illegal by law. Folks, as an older retired person, and one who spent a great deal of his working life in various aspects of Law Enforcement, please allow me to pass on one bit of wisdom I learned over the years...... the street, (IE - an Officer's working environment), is NOT the place to challenge an Officer, or his/her authority.

    If you have never served in Law Enforcement, you might just be surprised at how much authority an Officer really has..... especially when his/her personal safety is involved. If you feel you have been mistreated, or your rights violated, the place and/or time to vent your frustrations is with the Officer's superiors or in a court of law.

    Attitude goes a long way when dealing with any Law Enforcement Officer. If you can keep an encounter relaxed and friendly, so can an Officer. He/she still has to be suspicious, still has to be cautious, and is still required to follow established departmental procedures for Officer safety, but the overall tone of an encounter is usually set by the offender/suspect.

    Think about it folks......... put yourselves in an Officer's shoes and then remember how much you enjoy going home to your loved ones at the end of your work day. It might just give you a different perspective on things.

  6. #21
    Distinguished Member Array SubNine's Avatar
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    It is the law here in Alaska that you must inform LEO that you are armed when you're conducting official matters with the officer (pulled over, witness, traffic accident). I see no problems informing LEO that you're armed, because if you know you're legal and you have nothing to hide, then why not make things easier for the officer. I do believe here the CCW permit is attached to the driving record, so the officer would find out either way.
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  7. #22
    Senior Member Array downrange's Avatar
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    i would inform them either way. if i was or if i wasn't. i like to call it passing the peace pipe, laying all cards on the table, and making us both comfortable. 99.9% of the time i don't carry is because i'm going somewhere i can't (ie: i work in NJ)... and that's exactly what i would tell them.

    i wonder if a NJ LEO runs my PA plate or license could find out i'm CCW? hmm...
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  8. #23
    Member Array fireman69's Avatar
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    Here in Nebraska we must inform a LEO as soon as we are physically able to during any official contact that we are carrying. I see no problem with it. I think I'd volunteer that information even if I wasn't required too.

    I always roll down the window, turn on the dome light (if it's dark) and place my hands on the wheel and wait for the LEO. After they get done speaking I inform them of my CHP and that I'm carrying. I've only had to do this twice. Once for a road close/accident scene and once when I was speeding. The trooper thanked me for informing him during the closed road contact. However during the speeding contact I had to almost blurt it out because the trooper wouldn't let me speak he was so talkative. He was an older gentleman and had stood in front of the drivers window and almost leaned into my open window to talk. Seemed odd. He didn't even ask where my weapon was or ask for my permit. I pulled away fairly puzzled.
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  9. #24
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefense View Post
    What I am interested in are people's thoughts as to whether to inform a LEO if one is not armed. I have no idea whether my CCW status is tied to my license, registration, or neither. It certainly seems reasonable to inform the officer that I have a CCW and am not currently armed. If I do not do that and he finds I am a CCW holder he might (should) become more uncomfortable.

    Why not go out and research whether the police in your area ARE informed by your CCW license being tied to your license or registration? Then you'll know whether you even need to bother.

  10. #25
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveT View Post
    Put yourself in the officer's shoes, and you will soon realize that just about everything an Officer does is in some way tied in with his or her personal safety and wanting to make sure they go home to their families at night. ... From escorting someone out of a crowded store to talk outside, to disarming someone during a traffic stop.... it is all about OFFICER SAFETY.
    I've seen this said many times before--so many that it is by now clichéd. The funny thing (to me) is that police officers do not swear an oath to go home safe to their families at night; they swear an oath to uphold the law and the Constitution. When an officer takes actions because that's what will guarantee his safety, but it is at the expense of the rights of citizens, he is doing wrong.

    What right does an officer have to lie to someone to get him out of a store when he is not suspected of having committed a crime, and threaten him with "something really bad" if he doesn't comply, just because the officer wants to go home safe that night?

    If the only thing that means squat is making sure the cop stays safe, why not require that all citizens turn out their pockets and face a wall with their hands up whenever a cop is walking by?


    please allow me to pass on one bit of wisdom I learned over the years...... the street, (IE - an Officer's working environment), is NOT the place to challenge an Officer, or his/her authority.
    Forgive me if I am reading this wrong, and I exhort you to clarify if I do, but it sounds as though you are saying that any time we are out in PUBLIC at ALL--since we are in the working environment of the Police--we should never dare to insist on our rights.

    It's like you're saying that they're RULERS, who can never be QUESTIONED, just because they have their own safety foremost in their minds.

    Now, I know that there are loads of good cops who do put their safety second to that of the public they are sworn to protect; that's why I can't figure out why you seem to be asserting that officer safety is paramount about all.

    If you have never served in Law Enforcement, you might just be surprised at how much authority an Officer really has.....
    Or dismayed.

    especially when his/her personal safety is involved. If you feel you have been mistreated, or your rights violated, the place and/or time to vent your frustrations is with the Officer's superiors or in a court of law.
    Is that before, or after he has ignored your desperate pleas to loosen handcuffs that are causing severe pain and possible nerve damage?

    I mean, the officers in the VA story are alleged to have done just that. Who cares about the recourse you might have with the officer's superiors or a judge when the here-and-now is causing you pain and damage? What we need are officers who are not so absorbed in "going home to their families at night" that they will actually care about the people they are arresting, who are presumed innocent until proven guilty.



    Attitude goes a long way when dealing with any Law Enforcement Officer. If you can keep an encounter relaxed and friendly, so can an Officer. He/she still has to be suspicious, still has to be cautious, and is still required to follow established departmental procedures for Officer safety, but the overall tone of an encounter is usually set by the offender/suspect.
    I didn't pick up "attitude" from the telling of the VA story...

    Think about it folks......... put yourselves in an Officer's shoes and then remember how much you enjoy going home to your loved ones at the end of your work day. It might just give you a different perspective on things.
    I do not work under a contract or oath that says I will put others' rights first. To me, that's a huge difference.

  11. #26
    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman69 View Post
    I always roll down the window, turn on the dome light (if it's dark) and place my hands on the wheel and wait for the LEO.
    I do the latter two, but I leave the window up until he arrives. I then tell him through the window that I am about to lower it. The way I figure it, a window up means I am that much less apt to be doing something like shooting at him. (Wouldn't most people want to lower their window first so as not to have to shoot it out, if they were inclined to shoot the cop?)


    He was an older gentleman and had stood in front of the drivers window and almost leaned into my open window to talk. Seemed odd. He didn't even ask where my weapon was or ask for my permit. I pulled away fairly puzzled.
    I can't explain his willingness to lean in so close, but perhaps he was trying to see more about the inside of your car.

    As for the not asking about the weapon, perhaps he just understands that a person who would tell him they have a weapon is not the type who would be out to do him harm. I think that's just intuitive.

  12. #27
    Member Array DaveT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peacefuljeffrey View Post
    I've seen this said many times before--so many that it is by now clichéd. The funny thing (to me) is that police officers do not swear an oath to go home safe to their families at night; they swear an oath to uphold the law and the Constitution. When an officer takes actions because that's what will guarantee his safety, but it is at the expense of the rights of citizens, he is doing wrong.

    What right does an officer have to lie to someone to get him out of a store when he is not suspected of having committed a crime, and threaten him with "something really bad" if he doesn't comply, just because the officer wants to go home safe that night?

    If the only thing that means squat is making sure the cop stays safe, why not require that all citizens turn out their pockets and face a wall with their hands up whenever a cop is walking by?




    Forgive me if I am reading this wrong, and I exhort you to clarify if I do, but it sounds as though you are saying that any time we are out in PUBLIC at ALL--since we are in the working environment of the Police--we should never dare to insist on our rights.

    It's like you're saying that they're RULERS, who can never be QUESTIONED, just because they have their own safety foremost in their minds.

    Now, I know that there are loads of good cops who do put their safety second to that of the public they are sworn to protect; that's why I can't figure out why you seem to be asserting that officer safety is paramount about all.



    Or dismayed.



    Is that before, or after he has ignored your desperate pleas to loosen handcuffs that are causing severe pain and possible nerve damage?

    I mean, the officers in the VA story are alleged to have done just that. Who cares about the recourse you might have with the officer's superiors or a judge when the here-and-now is causing you pain and damage? What we need are officers who are not so absorbed in "going home to their families at night" that they will actually care about the people they are arresting, who are presumed innocent until proven guilty.





    I didn't pick up "attitude" from the telling of the VA story...



    I do not work under a contract or oath that says I will put others' rights first. To me, that's a huge difference.
    Your whole reply is about arguing.

    Not gonna go down that road.

    There's an old expression in the Harley world: "If I have to explain, you wouldn't understand."

    Well, I tried to explain from an Officer's point of view, you apparently don't want to try and understand things from an Officer's point of view.

    The post about VA might have involved Officers overstepping their authority, and I'm just as certain that there are other instances out there. But..... all Officers can not be lumped together. I was/am proud of everything I did in Law Enforcement, from working patrol to a working Chief of Police in a small community. And yes, I accomplished a lot, respected other's rights, did the job, and still went home safe to my family every night.

    I went by one rule that one of my Training Officer's passed on to me in the early years: "Treat others like you would want to be treated." It worked for me.

    Have a nice day.

  13. #28
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peacefuljeffrey View Post
    Why not go out and research whether the police in your area ARE informed by your CCW license being tied to your license or registration? Then you'll know whether you even need to bother.
    I will assume you simply misread my post. Your comment is completely irrelevant to the uetion.

    The fact is that it is not a bother to inform law enforcement whether I am armed. Any reasonable person would do so, whether it was the law or not.

    The question was whether to inform an officer that I am UNARMED, given the assumption they might have information that I have a CCW permit.

    I find it interesting that you choose to make another indvidual uncomfortable (an LEO concerned for safely returning to his family) solely because there is no law that mandates you act in a certain way.

  14. #29
    Member Array ttpete's Avatar
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    If I were a cop, I'd be happy to see a concealed permit, because I'd know that the individual was a law-abiding citizen. In MI, there is a whole list of disqualifying misdemeanors, including DUI in certain circumstances. So the officer knows that the person is reasonably upstanding, and not a habitual drunk....

    I personally haven't had any problem. They just ignored me and went about their business. I worry about the average officer unloading a person's weapon, because most have no idea how to clear anything other than their own issued gun. Especially a 1911, because it has to be made unsafe in order to clear it.
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  15. #30
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    any time I interact with LE during a stop , ect I will inform , whether I am carrying or not.
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