how often are you practicing drawing from a concealed holster? - Page 2

how often are you practicing drawing from a concealed holster?

This is a discussion on how often are you practicing drawing from a concealed holster? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; You mean, like today....

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Thread: how often are you practicing drawing from a concealed holster?

  1. #16
    Member Array JAG45's Avatar
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    You mean, like today.

  2. #17
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    every day!
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Array patkelly4370's Avatar
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    With Laser Lyte insert, I practice drawing and firing, 2-handed aimed and 1-hand from hip, at various distances.
    This is usually 2 out of 3 days.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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  5. #19
    VIP Member Array dangerranger's Avatar
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    Why not give a few min each time you empty and clean your gun? For me that's once a week or every other week. DR

  6. #20
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    Two or three pulls before I head out the door every morning.
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  7. #21
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    Used to for hours a week for several years but not in a long time to just draw. Now it's only when I'm pushing and testing the speed from concealed to first shot live fire.. Last summer, I was pulling .90-1.1 seconds to first shots at 64. All those years of practicing drawing from concealed helped.
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  8. #22
    Member Array Danielst's Avatar
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    every second day for 15 minutes,.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array Goldy49's Avatar
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    Pretty much everyday.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doogie View Post
    wait....didn't I just see an article on why you should not touch your EDC gun so not to have an AD?
    LOL, I practice maybe once a week. I use a SIRT most of the time so heh heh - no problemo. I do however break that rule with my 19, 26, Ruger LC9s and 1911 so ya kind of got me.
    Typos are for the entertainment of the reader. Don't let it go to your head

  11. #25
    Distinguished Member Array Chuck R.'s Avatar
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    I try to get in a few minutes daily, using a laser cartridge and a PACT timer set on a PAR time. I have a dry fire "range" with targets set up in my gun room/ basement. My normal dry fire routine (a lot of this is geared towards competitions):

    * 5-10 presentations from a ready position, Don’t press the trigger.
    * 8-10 correct draw strokes with no trigger press. Do these perfectly and develop a “groove”. NO SHORTCUTS! Present the gun from the holster and aligned with the target.
    * 8-10 correct draw strokes but still without pressing. Add speed but keep them smooth.
    * 8-10 draws adding trigger prep (taking up slack) but still not pressing off the shot. As the weapon rises into the line of sight, take up the slack, pick up the front sight and FOCUS on the front sight. HOLD IT. FOLLOW THROUGH. Do everything right to the edge of discharge but don’t break the trigger. Mentally, pause and verify that everything is as it should be and make a conscious decision about if you could get a perfect hit if needed.
    * 8-10 draws just like the previous one but add complete trigger press. As you press, monitor the front sight for movement. Go for perfect execution with no front sight dip or bounce. Get perfect sight alignment and picture.
    * Do 8-10 presentations with turns, both 90 and 180 degrees.

    General: Perform reloads and malfunction clearance drills. Add movement in all directions while performing the drills. Concentrate on staying on target while minimizing bouncing.
    Do presentations with your eyes closed to develop an index. Focus on the exact spot you wish to hit. Close your eyes and present the weapon. Open your eyes and see where you are actually aiming. Consider making postural adjustments so that you are better indexed.
    Present while sitting and every other position imaginable — kneel, prone, non-dominant hand, sitting at a table, supine, etc.

    I also practice the above with a hand held light, especially when I see a couple SOs are working the next match as they are prone to having low-light stages......

    I also have a range out back and last year went through a little over 20K in 9mm alone. I find the dry firing lets me make the most of my ammo/range time, even with shooting a couple times a week it's beneficial.

    Chuck
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  12. #26
    Senior Member Array MB53's Avatar
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    only when I have a mirror handy....
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  13. #27
    New Member Array talkalot's Avatar
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    I only practice drawing when I'm at the range, so like twice a month on average. I'm sure I would improve if I practiced more often but I don't really see the need. I can draw and be on target in 1-2 seconds which is fast enough. The way I look at it is this: if the bad guy has a gun pointed at you, it's very unlikely anyone could draw, aim, and shoot before he shoots so you best chance of survival is to cooperate and wait for an opportunity to draw or flee. If he has some other non-gun weapon, 2 seconds is plenty fast.

    That said, the faster the better. I should probably make it a habit to practice drawing, but for me it's tough because I can't carry on days I work so my gun is usually in my car or in some kind of bag.


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  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkalot View Post
    I only practice drawing when I'm at the range, so like twice a month on average. I'm sure I would improve if I practiced more often but I don't really see the need. I can draw and be on target in 1-2 seconds which is fast enough. The way I look at it is this: if the bad guy has a gun pointed at you, it's very unlikely anyone could draw, aim, and shoot before he shoots so you best chance of survival is to cooperate and wait for an opportunity to draw or flee. If he has some other non-gun weapon, 2 seconds is plenty fast.

    That said, the faster the better. I should probably make it a habit to practice drawing, but for me it's tough because I can't carry on days I work so my gun is usually in my car or in some kind of bag.


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    Lets hope so anyway, right?
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  15. #29
    Member Array Jacksinthe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkalot View Post
    I only practice drawing when I'm at the range, so like twice a month on average. I'm sure I would improve if I practiced more often but I don't really see the need. I can draw and be on target in 1-2 seconds which is fast enough. The way I look at it is this: if the bad guy has a gun pointed at you, it's very unlikely anyone could draw, aim, and shoot before he shoots so you best chance of survival is to cooperate and wait for an opportunity to draw or flee. If he has some other non-gun weapon, 2 seconds is plenty fast.

    That said, the faster the better. I should probably make it a habit to practice drawing, but for me it's tough because I can't carry on days I work so my gun is usually in my car or in some kind of bag.


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    "Don't draw on a drawn gun" only applies when the threat isn't actively paying attention to you.

    Compliance doesn't mean safety and there are so many examples of how complying still gets you killed. We also have plenty of examples of how 1 on 1 situations where the bad guy has a gun drawn already takes his attention away from the victim for just the blink of an eye and see our defenders take action with their own weapon.

    No such thing as "plenty fast", IMO.
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    I train daily even if all I can squeeze is 5 minutes and if I'm tired, I just go slow without mistakes so I only program good draws into my autonomic response.

  16. #30
    Member Array Holmes375's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkalot View Post
    I only practice drawing when I'm at the range, so like twice a month on average. I'm sure I would improve if I practiced more often but I don't really see the need. I can draw and be on target in 1-2 seconds which is fast enough. The way I look at it is this: if the bad guy has a gun pointed at you, it's very unlikely anyone could draw, aim, and shoot before he shoots so you best chance of survival is to cooperate and wait for an opportunity to draw or flee. If he has some other non-gun weapon, 2 seconds is plenty fast.

    That said, the faster the better. I should probably make it a habit to practice drawing, but for me it's tough because I can't carry on days I work so my gun is usually in my car or in some kind of bag.
    I don't practice drawing from concealment simply to become faster, per se. I'm probably as fast as I'm ever going to be. My goal is to maintain an ingrained auto-response that sees my weapon put into play without fumbling. It promotes confidence and efficacy that I'll need in a highly stressful and dynamic scenario. This is good for me and those around me... except for the bad guy, of course.
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