First Time Stopped and Officer looked scared

This is a discussion on First Time Stopped and Officer looked scared within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by JD If he didn't know what to do with a 1911, good on him for not trying to figure it out at ...

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Thread: First Time Stopped and Officer looked scared

  1. #46
    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JD View Post
    If he didn't know what to do with a 1911, good on him for not trying to figure it out at the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Many "new" officers aren't gun people, and with the 1911 fading from most duty selections, I'm not suprised if all of them don't know how it works.
    +1 Perhaps enough 'information' made to his head (CWP....your legal, cocked/locked 1911......"I dunno this sidearm-I better NOT handle it, both of you obaying his commands-"thier not a threat")
    he was able to asertain the situation properly.
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

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  3. #47
    Member Array TonyB's Avatar
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    I think it's a symptom of the way we're taught these days......guns are bad,only cops should have them.If you,a regular citizen has one you must be up to something.Very sad.
    "Just because I'm paranoid,doesn't mean they're NOT after me...."

  4. #48
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    2 traffic stops. 2 state troopers and one county mounty. 3 times got read the riot act over my cocked and locked 45. also about open carry "in my vehicle". sure wish tn. would educate officers just a little on tn. handgun carry permit law.

  5. #49
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    I didn't see this mentioned (I apologize if it was) but, the car should have been off, windows down and hands in plain sight before the officer even got to the window.

    Not trying to be a wise guy, just offering some advice.

    I have even gone so far as to remove the keys from the ignition and place them on the dash. The officer asked, "Why did you take the keys out?" I said, "A cop buddy once suggested I do this if I were ever pulled over." We had a nice little chat and off I went with a warning.
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  6. #50
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    Quote:
    Then he asked me if he could secure my firearm for his safety.

    Wonder what would have happened if you had said "NO." How 'bout I keep it in the holster for all of our safety?

    It was a Yes - NO question. Either answer shows no agression.

  7. #51
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    Is it required by law to give him your pistol? To me that's like confiscation. I know for a fact that I'd politely say, "I'm sorry officer, I will not consent to giving you my pistol. My hands will stay on the steering wheel at all times unless you ask for something and then I'll move slowly to get it."
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  8. #52
    Senior Member Array Vaquero 45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doobie View Post
    Is it required by law to give him your pistol? To me that's like confiscation. I know for a fact that I'd politely say, "I'm sorry officer, I will not consent to giving you my pistol. My hands will stay on the steering wheel at all times unless you ask for something and then I'll move slowly to get it."
    If the state issues the license to conduct the activity (ie: carry a concealed weapon), then you can bet the state retains the right to regulate it. If you are pulled over for a violation of the law, it is certainly not YOU that controls the investigation. Unless you have the burning desire to be disarmed at gunpoint, I'd comply with the officer's instructions.

    Good luck finding a jurisdiction in the United States where you can refuse to disarm upon the request of lawful authority during an investigation. Although it may feel like "confiscation" in your mind, remarkably, sometimes it's not all about you. You'll get your firearm back if you're legal.

    Here's some New Hampshire law you should read before deciding to "refuse to consent" to being disarmed:

    TITLE LXII
    CRIMINAL CODE
    CHAPTER 642
    OBSTRUCTING GOVERNMENTAL OPERATIONS
    Section 642:2
    642:2 Resisting Arrest or Detention. A person is guilty of a misdemeanor when the person knowingly or purposely physically interferes with a person recognized to be a law enforcement official, including a probation or parole officer, seeking to effect an arrest or detention of the person or another regardless of whether there is a legal basis for the arrest. A person is guilty of a class B felony if the act of resisting arrest or detention causes serious bodily injury, as defined in RSA 625:11, VI, to another person. Verbal protestations alone shall not constitute resisting arrest or detention.

    Source. 1971, 518:1. 1983, 347:2. 1992, 85:1. 1995, 237:3, eff. Jan. 1, 1996. 2007, 191:1, eff. Jan. 1, 2008.

    Someone refusing to disarm at a traffic stop would be a HUGE red flag to me. I wouldn't hesitate to hold you at gunpoint until my backup arrives to disarm you with or without your consent. Reasonable people don't tell police officers to go pound sand (however politely) when a firearm is involved during an investigation. This isn't a game, and it doesn't matter what mental gymnastics you've made to make the law what you want it to be, rather than what it is.

    Good citizens with CCW permits are a small minority of citizens, and it only takes a few negative incidents involving CCW holders to ruin it for everyone. I'd hate to see the anti-gunners win because somebody thinks that non-cooperation with law enforcement is a good idea. Believe it or not, most LE are on your side.
    Slow is smooth.....smooth is fast.

  9. #53
    Senior Member Array rljohns's Avatar
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    In Colorado the LEO can temporarily dis-arm you, but "MUST" return it after the stop (assuming that you aren't arrested).

  10. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by doobie View Post
    Is it required by law to give him your pistol? To me that's like confiscation. I know for a fact that I'd politely say, "I'm sorry officer, I will not consent to giving you my pistol. My hands will stay on the steering wheel at all times unless you ask for something and then I'll move slowly to get it."
    Being traffic stopped is a detainment for the investigation of a crime, and a traffic citation is technically an arrest, so yes, you are required to be disarmed at the officers discretion.
    Sorry to say, your position on this will not work out to well for you.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  11. #55
    Senior Member Array Chevy-SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    The initial contact is seemingly "rude" by design, I wouldn't worry about that to much. After all, this was a police officer, not your friendly local ice cream man........
    Rude by design???? I certainly hope they don't teach that at LE Academy. That's total BS and I find it very offensive.

    One of my good friends is a long-time LEO (now detective) and I have NEVER seen him be rude. He can be tough as a pitbull when needed, but he truly respects the citizenry and is supremely cordial to all.

    Rudeness has no place in LE, IMHO.................
    'Be careful, even in small matters' - Miyamoto Musashi

  12. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chevy-SS View Post
    Rude by design???? I certainly hope they don't teach that at LE Academy. That's total BS and I find it very offensive.

    One of my good friends is a long-time LEO (now detective) and I have NEVER seen him be rude. He can be tough as a pitbull when needed, but he truly respects the citizenry and is supremely cordial to all.

    Rudeness has no place in LE, IMHO.................
    LOL. Yes, rude by design. Your opinion of whats is rude might be totally different that the next guy. More often than not, people complain about a rude cop when its nothing more than stern. That is by design. Much like a clean cut, in shape cop with a sharply worn uniform will get far more immediate respect that the slob. Again, by design. We do not become "officer friendly" until we confirm that Joe Citizen is on the up and up.

    I've got several complaints for being "rude" as does every other cop I know or work with. We have an inside joke that goes along the lines of "If you don't get complained on from time to time, your not doing your job" I know, you probably find that offensive too- just stick with me for a minute.
    People generally are not happy with the police because that are having a bad day (victim), or they just got caught doing something they shouldn't have.
    Every complaint I ever had myself was one of two kinds,

    1) It was a defensive move from the suspect. I.E., they think if they cry about a rude officer, the citation, charge or what ever will get tossed out. Sorry, it doesn't work that way.

    2) Perception- People think I was picking on them, or "rude" because I caught them speeding, with drugs or whatever. When in fact, it was a no nonsense approach to the situation. A lot of people perceive that as being "rude" So be it. I'm recorded during arrests, and each and every complaint of "rudeness" was tossed out the window. We actually have a citizen review panel that will listen to tapes if requested by the complainant. Most of the time, even they (the complainant ) will agree that they were being over sensitive once they listen to the tape again. 9 out of 10 times it just perception.

    FWIW, I have far more commendations, I've been awarded L.E. Officer of the year several times etc., for doing excellent police work than complaints received, let alone sustained. (which is none. 0, ZIP, Nothing)

    What I find offensive is someone telling me my post is BS when I do it every day for years and take the time to share a street cops perspective with the forum, for your benefit. I'm pretty sure I know what I'm talking about by now. You can take it or leave it, but call it BS, be prepared to defend that statement.
    You gathering your "BS" opinion from limited experience with your one cop buddy and passing that as a knowledgeable position is offensive to me... and a lot of BS.











    See now, was that last paragraph rude, or no nonsense?
    "Just blame Sixto"

  13. #57
    VIP Member Array ron8903's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    LOL. Yes, rude by design. Your opinion of whats is rude might be totally different that the next guy. More often than not, people complain about a rude cop when its nothing more than stern. That is by design. Much like a clean cut, in shape cop with a sharply worn uniform will get far more immediate respect that the slob. Again, by design. We do not become "officer friendly" until we confirm that Joe Citizen is on the up and up.

    I've got several complaints for being "rude" as does every other cop I know or work with. We have an inside joke that goes along the lines of "If you don't get complained on from time to time, your not doing your job" I know, you probably find that offensive too- just stick with me for a minute.
    People generally are not happy with the police because that are having a bad day (victim), or they just got caught doing something they shouldn't have.
    Every complaint I ever had myself was one of two kinds,

    1) It was a defensive move from the suspect. I.E., they think if they cry about a rude officer, the citation, charge or what ever will get tossed out. Sorry, it doesn't work that way.

    2) Perception- People think I was picking on them, or "rude" because I caught them speeding, with drugs or whatever. When in fact, it was a no nonsense approach to the situation. A lot of people perceive that as being "rude" So be it. I'm recorded during arrests, and each and every complaint of "rudeness" was tossed out the window. We actually have a citizen review panel that will listen to tapes if requested by the complainant. Most of the time, even they (the complainant ) will agree that they were being over sensitive once they listen to the tape again. 9 out of 10 times it just perception.

    FWIW, I have far more commendations, I've been awarded L.E. Officer of the year several times etc., for doing excellent police work than complaints received, let alone sustained. (which is none. 0, ZIP, Nothing)

    What I find offensive is someone telling me my post is BS when I do it every day for years and take the time to share a street cops perspective with the forum, for your benefit. I'm pretty sure I know what I'm talking about by now. You can take it or leave it, but call it BS, be prepared to defend that statement.
    You gathering your "BS" opinion from limited experience with your one cop buddy and passing that as a knowledgeable position is offensive to me... and a lot of BS.











    See now, was that last paragraph rude, or no nonsense?


    "A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on."
    - Sir Winston Churchill

  14. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chevy-SS View Post
    Rude by design???? I certainly hope they don't teach that at LE Academy. That's total BS and I find it very offensive.

    One of my good friends is a long-time LEO (now detective) and I have NEVER seen him be rude. He can be tough as a pitbull when needed, but he truly respects the citizenry and is supremely cordial to all.

    Rudeness has no place in LE, IMHO.................
    I have been accused of being rude before, but I was just being short and to the point ie. No nonsense.

    Once I find out it is Mr. Upright Citizen and not Mr. Dirtbag then I get chatty and more relaxed. Until then I treat you like you might want to kill me.
    Sometimes I wonder who the old man in the mirror is....

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  15. #59
    Senior Member Array Chevy-SS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    LOL. Yes, rude by design. Your opinion of whats is rude might be totally different that the next guy...I'm pretty sure I know what I'm talking about by now. You can take it or leave it, but call it BS, be prepared to defend that statement....

    Your choice of the word "rude" was a poor one. If you had simply said "stern" in the first place.......

    Some common definitions -

    RUDE: ill-mannered: socially incorrect in behavior; ill-bred: (of persons) lacking in refinement or grace

    STERN: firm, strict, or uncompromising: stern discipline


    I honestly cannot think of even one situation where a LEO should be "rude"........ Firm, forceful, stern, even sometimes lethal -those are OK, but "rude" - no way.............


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  16. #60
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    Like I said, rude is a matter of perception. And when human perception is involved, definition is thrown out the window.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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