How much prep for carry?

This is a discussion on How much prep for carry? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Conan, You must be a reloader! That is a lot of practice each week. Also, it sounds like you have a great range to go ...

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Thread: How much prep for carry?

  1. #16
    Member Array Cyklopz's Avatar
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    Conan,

    You must be a reloader! That is a lot of practice each week. Also, it sounds like you have a great range to go to as no ranges around here allow those kinds of practice sessions.

    Cy

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  3. #17
    Member Array Conan's Avatar
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    I am not a reloader, but I have a friend that does it for me, for cost of supplies! The range is great it has small private ranges that are burmed on 3 sides making it possible to do this stuff! We still only shoot toward the back but we have some options as to position and movement within the walls of the range.
    I carry a gun because cops are too heavy!
    Take my advice, Don't take my advice!

  4. #18
    Senior Member Array Macattack's Avatar
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    The best way to prepare is to practice and when you get it go down to wally world for some nachos. No matter how much you prepare, It will feel like everyone can see you printing and you will have to force yourself to not keep touching it to make sure its there.\

    After a few weeks or a month, you get comfortable and it becomes as routine as carrying a wallet.

    Good luck
    -Mac
    "In those days, there was a lot more respect for other people and it showed in peoples values.... Today the word value means nothing more than something you get on the $1 menu at McDonald's." -BARK'N

  5. #19
    Member Array bluedaisy's Avatar
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    For me, I had to really get in the mental mindset. The 'what if's', and scenarios played out. I always figured I'd pull the trigger if it came down to my life or theirs, but I had to be sure I was ready to do that.

    The biggest part of it for me was definitely the mental aspect...realizing that yes, it is either them or me (or my kids), and what ramifications there would be on my life and theirs if I did or did not pull the trigger. It is highly likely that my young children would be witnessing everything, and that also has an impact.

    Learning the gun is the easy part. Training you mind isn't always so cut and dry.
    "Let me control the textbooks, and I will control the state." - Adolf Hitler

  6. #20
    Member Array TonySoprano's Avatar
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    Well as far as training I'm ex military and LEO. Weapons if a semi auto 1,000 rounds fired of carry ammo without any malfunctions, Revolver has to go 500 rounds of carry ammo.
    I also hit the range weekly and fire 100 round course of fire with each gun.

  7. #21
    Member Array Purdue54's Avatar
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    I agree with BlueDaisy in the previous post. The physical aspects of self protection are one thing; the mental are another. I am a 30 year infantry/ranger/sf veteran who knows the physical aspects well. I work equally on the mental aspects as well. It doesn't hurt to consult your lawyer too. Additionally, I consider myself a pretty good hand-to-hand fighter but I'm looking into a martial art for conditioning and better preparation. Firearms are the last resort. One last recommendation, go find a United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA) or an IDPA (can't remember what it stands for) match and shoot in them. They generally create good shooting scenarios that put you under pressure and cause you to execute many reloads and immediate action drills. More to think about!

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array cwblanco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluedaisy View Post
    For me, I had to really get in the mental mindset. The 'what if's', and scenarios played out. I always figured I'd pull the trigger if it came down to my life or theirs, but I had to be sure I was ready to do that.

    The biggest part of it for me was definitely the mental aspect...realizing that yes, it is either them or me (or my kids), and what ramifications there would be on my life and theirs.
    The desire to survive is a basic animal/human instinct that really does not require conditioning. Be assured that when circumstances arise where there is no question about the threat, the target, and the absolute need to take action, nature has already created the mindset for you.

    The more difficult challenges are recognizing the threat and the immediate need to take action, plus being proficient in the use of the weapon.

    I do not subscribe to the touchy-feely notion that it takes special conditioning to take action against one who is trying to kill you. On the other hand, when innocents get caught up in the fray and are harmed (sometimes referred as collaterals or collateral damage), only the non-human mind would not be disturbed about it.

    I suspect that those who have served in LEO/combat situations will know what I am talking about.

  9. #23
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    The best thing I did was to take a 4-day pistol self-defense class. This was the beginning of my CCW and the instructor instilled the idea of developing muscle memory on a number of fronts.

    Other than that important step, I would just strap on that sidearm and start wearing it around the house and everywhere else you go...you'll soon get used to it.

    Always remember the 'finger' thing...it's your last safety!

    Stay armed...remember the 'finger'...stay safe!
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

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  10. #24
    Member Array Cyklopz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the comments everyone. Any other words of advice out there?

    I've been around guns since I was a kid but did not shoot much, every now and then I would get to shoot something and even went to a range and rented guns a couple of times along the way. I wanted a gun(s) for SD since I turned 21 but never felt I was in a position or quite mentally ready for the burden until now. At 41 I'd say its way past time but then again its never to late. Still, I want to take precautions, consider as many aspects as possible, prepare as best I can and hope I never have to employ a gun to defend myself. I will be looking for professional training as best I am able. My wife has even said that a "vacation" to Thunder Ranch or similar could be fun. Until then I'm going to try to find some local training on pistol and shotgun and get to the range as much as I can.

    Cy

  11. #25
    Member Array Lnd Svyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwblanco View Post
    To begin with, I will assume that you have done a lot of reading, and of course have a good grasp of the safety rules - always an absolute must. Have more than a casual familiarity your handgun -- everything from loading to disassemby and reassembly. More familiarization including dry firing, and repeated loading, chambering, unloading, and then of course, range firing to the extent that your time and budget will permit.

    Walking around with an empty holster is akin to non-swimmer developing a swimming mindset by wearing his bathing suit without getting into the water. The bathing suit does not develop the "mindset." It is the conquering of the "real water" that develops the mindset.

    At least initially, open carry is a snap when compared to concealed carry which is an art in and of itself. Confidence in carrying concealed comes from frequently carrying the real thing, and overcoming the feeling that everyone knows that you are carrying. Without proper concealed carry clothing and a proper holster, it is difficult to develop this confidence. The more you carry, the less sef-conscious you become, and eventually you are totally at home with the concealed carry environment.

    I have to disagree with open carry being a snap. I was 46 years old before I saw a civilian openly carry. Open carry is LEGAL in Virginia. I WANT to OPENLY CARRY. It is easier. I am sick and tired of HIDING my RIGHT to CARRY. At the end of the day, one has to realize that the criminal element is not deterred one way or the other. The only thing that matters here is:

    1. We have the right to defend our lives (self-preservation) and anyone (democrats, perhaps) who says differently is wrong; and,
    2. The general public are not conditioned to that right of self-defense (and erringly think that the police will protect them--not true; they are, however, good at tracking down the people who killed you).

  12. #26
    Member Array Cyklopz's Avatar
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    I would say that the Police are sometimes good at cleaning up the mess after a situation has occurred. Now, I respect the police a lot but they are not really able to protect us on the front end as there are simply to few of them, to many of us and to many of the BGs who are not always easy to spot.

    The police have one of the toughest jobs in the world, are underpaid, understaffed and don't really have the tools they need to do the job.

    Anyway, it'll be more practice both at the range and at home for me. My first holster came along with a new belt so at least I can start to practice carrying around the house (or open) and draws until my class in two weeks.

    Thanks again everyone.

    Cy

  13. #27
    Senior Member Array jofrdo's Avatar
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    So many responders in this thread seem to have had a lifelong familiarity with guns and aren't fully answering the question posed in the original post. For me, getting to the point where I armed myself was a gradual process of realizing my vulnerabilities and the fact that I am on my own when it comes to self defense. By the time I actually got the permit and carried in public the first time, I had gotten to the point that I didn't care what others might think or say; I armed myself because it was just too important not to. Carrying wasn't stressful to me. Rather, it was a relief to finally have the tool at hand if it became necessary to use it.

    Sorry if the following becomes somewhat of a confessional.

    I was raised with no firearm exposure. Although my dad had his dad's 19th century muzzle loader and his childhood .22 rifle in storage in our house, he never took them out to show them to my siblings and me. I didn't grow up anti-gun; I was just neutral. As I got into my mid 40's, I began to feel more vulnerable. Any youthful feeling of imortality was long gone, and an arthritic knee reminded me that I could no longer run from danger.

    At the same time, I was becoming more political. As a Jew, most of my friends are full-left liberals. I started getting fed up with the expectation that I should embrace the full left-wing agenda just because of my religious affiliation and became more interested in some of the hot button issues. When my rabbi and his wife invited us to attend the Million Mom March in 2000, I was able to tell them "no way, those people want to disarm law-abiding Americans."

    It was after that mild confrontation that I became interested in guns and started buying gun magazines at the newsstand. A coworker mentored my wife and me at a commercial range; it was the first time I had ever held a gun in my hands! I went back to the range a couple of times to shoot rental guns, and before long, I was shopping for a used carry gun. A friend sold me a .22 snubbie for a nickel (but I had to put about $70 into getting it to work right). She had paid $0.04 for it so she made a profit on the resale! It wasn't my first choice of a carry gun but the price was right and it got my feet in the water while I saved for the purchase of a more sufficient piece.

    My wife and I went together to take the Handgun Safety class, I applied for a permit and joined a private gun club so I could shoot when it was convenient to me. An instructor at the club loaned me a copy of Massad Ayoob's book "In the Gravest Extreme" so that I could get my mind right. That book taught me about the civil liabilities that come with even a justified self defense shooting, and really sobered me up to the great responsibility that comes with making the decision to shoot someone. It almost made me decide against carrying.

    I keep reading on self defense and guns to keep current and to keep my mind sharp. Many say that during an incident, one's training will kick in. I'm convinced that that's not just true of physical skills, but also for mental and situational awareness. Reading about others' self defense encounters, on this forum and in books and magazines, will help me be able to assess threats and respond appropriately when a real threat situation happens.

  14. #28
    Senior Member Array PaulG's Avatar
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    I grew up around guns but was never interested in them.

    For most of my life, I never fired anything except an occassional .22 caliber rifle and not much of that.

    In 2003, at 52 years of age, I decided to get a permit and arm myself.

    I took an NRA basic pistol class. In this class, I fired a .22, a 9mil and a 45 (Sig).

    At that time, I was amazed by the power of the 9 and 45. The recoil really surprised me.

    At that point, I was kinda afraid of the guns. My plan to carry was put on hold until I could get some training.

    I bought a Kimber Custom TLE II but wouldn't even keep it loaded at home because I was so uncomfortable with shooting.

    I started going to the range regularly (at least once a week and lots of $$$). I got comfortable with handling the gun pretty quickly.

    Then I heard about a IPSC class being offered for rookies wanting to shoot in IPSC matches.

    It was a 12 week class that went over everything from drawing from a holster to shooting on the move and shooting at moving targets; from behind barracades, etc.

    When I finally got my permit, the first time I carried, I carried in an IWB holster with an open dress shirt over a T-shirt to cover the gun.

    I thought everyone at Safeway just KNEW I was carrying. I was fairly tense. I figured that I better keep doing this to get over the concern.

    Now, I have learned that even when I open carry, most of the people don't notice my gun.

    I generally forget I have one on now.

    Keep training and carrying. You will get better and better at shooting and less concerned about carrying.
    fortiter in re, suaviter in modo (resolutely in action, gently in manner).

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array cwblanco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lnd Svyr View Post
    I have to disagree with open carry being a snap. I was 46 years old before I saw a civilian openly carry.
    The original statement was that open carry was a snap when compared to concealed carry. When I carried openly in the military, there was an instant adjustment. Getting comfortable with concealed carry required all kinds of trial and error gimmicks to determine which works best to carry comfortably without printing.

    Oh well, just say that we disagree on that point.

  16. #30
    Senior Member Array wjh2657's Avatar
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    30 Years in the USMC
    6 years in RVN
    Gunsite in early eighties.

    Current:
    shoot at indoor range with carry ammo every two weeks.
    Shoot .22 S&W 317 (J Frame) almost every day into bullet trap.

    Pocket carry and that is the way I practice.

    I try to keep eye and hand coordinated, don't want to forget how to do it when I really need it. I carry J Frame S&Ws and it takes a lot of practice just to be good enough.
    Retired Marine, Retired School Teacher, Independent voter, Goldwater Conservative.

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