A Rude Pro 2nd Amendment Supporter Harassed My Daughter - Page 10

A Rude Pro 2nd Amendment Supporter Harassed My Daughter

This is a discussion on A Rude Pro 2nd Amendment Supporter Harassed My Daughter within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by ExSoldier The tactic actually served a multitude of purposes. Folks from different IDPA clubs might get together on a given evening and ...

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Thread: A Rude Pro 2nd Amendment Supporter Harassed My Daughter

  1. #136
    VIP Member Array rodc13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExSoldier View Post
    The tactic actually served a multitude of purposes. Folks from different IDPA clubs might get together on a given evening and hit several of the offending restaurants in an evening and finally come to rest in an establishment that was not offensive in such ways to fellowship with each other, have a great meal and discuss upcoming matches. By mixing the clubs and nights the restaurant managers and wait staff never saw the same folks twice and it tended to lend credence to the little game.

    The chain gave up the policy before we go to try these variations: Have the wives get together for a "coffee" to discuss church or community projects and hit the places and point out the signs while exclaiming that their husbands had been talking about that just the other night and they certainly weren't going to undercut their spouses and their own long held beliefs....

    Then we were thinking of having the college kids do the same thing.... and maybe make it a Fraternity thing.....
    Very valid and effective tactics, Ex.

    It's all a question of whose ox is being gored. The OP just didn't like that his daughter happened to be on the wrong end of a political tactic against the business's controversial anti-self defense position.

    Then again, some people are opposed to any type of political statement that might be interpreted as "rude" or "offensive". As John Adams said (regarding circumstances that were really difficult), "This is a revolution, damn it! We've got to offend somebody!"

    Hardly comparing Mr. & Ms. X to John Adams, but political statements, demonstrations, boycotts, etc. are often interpreted as rude or offensive, typically by the person or group they're directed against. Comes with the territory. Support a bad policy, accept the consequences.
    Cheers,
    Rod
    "We're paratroopers. We're supposed to be surrounded!" Dick Winters


  2. #137
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExSoldier View Post
    The tactic actually served a multitude of purposes. Folks from different IDPA clubs might get together on a given evening and hit several of the offending restaurants in an evening and finally come to rest in an establishment that was not offensive in such ways to fellowship with each other, have a great meal and discuss upcoming matches. By mixing the clubs and nights the restaurant managers and wait staff never saw the same folks twice and it tended to lend credence to the little game.
    Yes, the little game. It is so altruistic of you to disrupt business for the sole reason of making a political statement. Sounds like tactics Code Pink might use.

    It is so disingenuous for people to play childish games so a business owner can make more money. "We'll show him how much money he is losing!" What nonsense. The bottom line is you are trying to change company policies by intimidation. If you don't want to buy a product from a particular place then don't. But don't pretend you care a whit about how much money the business might lose. It is childish politics.

    Why not organize a community townhall and discuss the issues with the people? Because that is not as much fun a wasting people's time playing high school pranks.

  3. #138
    Member Array flor1's Avatar
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    Makes the case for there being know excuss for bad manner's. I also think you should be proud of your daughter. She seemed to handle the situation in a professional manner.

  4. #139
    Member Array waynesan's Avatar
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    Well, I thought you all would be interested in the final update on this situation. I guess every angle has been discussed and a lot of opinions shared and I think we all benefited from it.
    Today, Mr. and Mrs. X called my daughter at the store and told her they had decided to purchase the glasses. They came in and while they did not apologize directly, Mrs. X did tell my girl out of Mr. Xs hearing, that "he gets riled up sometimes." And that was that.
    I guess he dicided that the product he wanted wasn't worth a boycott after all.
    Raising children is like being pecked to death by a chicken every day.

  5. #140
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    Excellent outcome for the daughter, must be a good value-added product, and they decided to buy them notwithstanding their personal feelings on RKBA where a sign prohibits.

    Some will debate that matter (RKBA), but they made a personal decision based on their convictions and all of thhe facts.

  6. #141
    Member Array Tye_Defender's Avatar
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    Anytime you have the potential customer in front of you, you have a chance to turn it into a sale. I have heard the average sale is made after the third "No".

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock and Glock View Post
    To those whom work for yourselves, invest in fuel to meet a client, invest your time in meeting them, understanding their needs and desires, invest in doing all of the pricing work and the specs, invest in building a proposal and presenting the proposal to the client. The client then tells you, "my brother-in-law is going to do the project and I just wanted to keep him honest"...........Did you get a fair shake, a fair chance to sell yourself? I think not!
    Maybe you would consider me rude, but I have done similar things to this several times. A couple examples:
    A few years ago, I went into a specialty store to look at telescopes. Wal-Mart had a telescope from Meade that I thought was cool, this specialty store sold Meade products so I went in to get information (since I did not know much about telescopes) to help me decide whether it was worth the extra money to buy the more expensive Meade telescope from Wal-Mart or a cheaper one from Wal-Mart. The people at the specialty store were very helpful and I was able to get enough information to make a decision.
    Another time: When I was moving from California, one of the people I used to work with had become a Real Estate Agent and I needed to sell my house. Since he was kinda new at this, I also called a second guy to come talk to me so I could get some ideas that might help my ex co-worker and I market my house. The second guy showed me how he marketed using the internet, open houses, etc. and gave me lots of great ideas on how to sell my house.

    Now the people whose time I "wasted/stole" from were both sales people. The real estate agent was on commission and had to drive over (so no money without a sale), the specialty store person was not (so got paid whether the sale was made or not, but store did not). Both gave me great information, which is what I was looking for, so I got out of the interaction what I was looking for. They were both sales people, so what they were looking for in the interaction was a chance to make their sales pitch, and they got that. Both of us got what we should reasonably expect.

    In terms of the original post, the daughter had her chance to make her sales pitch. It would truly be rude if the people had come in and simply discussed the policy for an hour with the salesperson and monopolized her time and did not allow her to give her sales pitch. If she was working for a company where she had to drive to the clients house, it would be rude to ask her to come over and then yell at her about the policy and not allow her to make the sales pitch. To allow her to make her pitch and then not buy because of any reason, is not rude. Every second you have talking to the customer is another second to make the sale.

    Now that it is all over, isn't your daughter happy that she had the chance to give her pitch? Does she feel she was rude to bad mouth a potential customer and then take their money when they decide to buy? (Sorry, that was "way harsh". I am not saying that she is rude or hypocritical. If she does feel bad she should let it go and learn from the experience. Especially if she will continue in a sales type job.)

    Oh and by the way, the specialty store that sold the telescopes did make the sale. I initially just wanted to get information about what terms like aperture meant, and what effect different focal lengths had. I figured it would be a couple minute conversation. After talking to them for a couple minutes, I decided to talk for a couple more. They spent nearly 30 minutes with me, showing me each part of a telescope and explaining what it did. I bought from them ($100 more than I planned to spend at Wal-Mart) because I realized I needed what they were selling. Not telescopes, even Wal-Mart has those. They were selling relationship and support for a hobby I was getting into. They turned a quick, 2 minute, conversation into a sale because I gave them time to do their sales pitch.

    That's all I owe a sales person who has given me information. A chance to give the pitch. Mr. and Mrs. X gave the OP's daughter a chance to give the pitch. They didn't have to say why they weren't buying, it would have been perfectly fine for them to just say "never mind" and walk out, but they had the courtesy to express their reasons. I sometimes don't say why I'm not buying. I'll say I want to think about it or just say thank you and walk out. If I say why I'm not going to buy, it's because I want the sales person to do something about it. Like lower the price a little, or throw in free oil changes for the year, or whatever. Give the sales person a chance to sell. In this case they wanted the sales person to tell the store owner/manager that their policy was irritating people. After that had been done, they bought what she was selling. Sounds like a normal sales transaction to me.

    Another BTW, the Realtor who's time I "wasted" is the one that sold my house and got the commission (California house during the boom, several thousand dollars, well worth the drive over I think).

    Every second you have with a customer is a chance to make the sale. Remember that.

  7. #142
    VIP Member Array rodc13's Avatar
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    Tye, that's a very thoughtful post. Thanks for giving your perspective.

    The worst situation for a sales person is when the customer doesn't give a reason for their actions. Then, there's no opportunity to turn things around. As you said, this couple did provide their rationale, and then came back when they reconsidered.

    Hopefully, the OP's daughter has learned a valuable lesson from this experience.
    Cheers,
    Rod
    "We're paratroopers. We're supposed to be surrounded!" Dick Winters

  8. #143
    Senior Member Array wjh2657's Avatar
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    I support the Second Amendment by being a member of the NRA, being a card carrying Libertarian and supporting Gun-friendly political leaders and reps.

    I do not "support" it by browbeating clerks in stores or screaming threats at people who have nothing to do with my Second Amendment rights. There also people out there with property rights and that includes merchants. Our rights end where theirs begin. I simply turn around and walk out when I see the signs, he doesn't want me in his store (my gun is part of me) and I don't need to give him my money, they don't get my business. The exceptions are those areas that are covered by state law. The gun goes in the Trunk lock box if I want to have a glass of wine with my meal. I can live with that.

    Many in the public have a picture of us CCWers as: beer guzzling, wife-beating, loudmouthed, arrogant domestic terrorists. That is not helping promote 2dA rights.

    I'm a well educated (graduate) country boy , a Veteran, reasonable, a non-abusive father and grandfather, and I carry a gun. I carry that gun without arousing any ire in other citizens who choose not to carry and without making a public spectacle of myself.

    That's my way. I don't say you have to follow it. If however, you get arrested for refusing to leave a place that doesn't want you and argue the law with the LEO just before you call him a stupid MF (1st Amendment rights!) do not expect my sympathy. Abusive and arrogant behavior is in bad taste and counter productive no matter how right your cause is.

    Follow the Marine Corps rule. Greet every stranger with a smile, a kind word, a firm handshake and be formulating a plan on how to kill him if he proves to be a threat. To be shot by somebody who is smiling at you is even more unnerving!

    I don't feel carrying makes me any taller or tougher nor changes the rules of polite society. Don't confuse your car (or Truck) or your gun with your reproductive equipment!
    Retired Marine, Retired School Teacher, Independent voter, Goldwater Conservative.

  9. #144
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    Tye:

    I won't pass judgment on you. You made a great post with well thought out ideas and points. My goal, whether selling my consulting services or my wife's products at her store, is to build a relationship and later close the sale. One of the selling points (at her store) if customers or prospects brought up Wal-Mart, Bass Pro Shops, Internet shops etc. was the exact same as that which turned you into a loyal customer of the specialty shop - a relationship as well as a problem solving advice center. It worked pretty well most of the time - my wife had over 1,500 regular customers buying seed from her, which is pretty much a commodity, which is price sensitive. Not bad. The other stuff (bird feeders, etc. we had superior quality that stood out), optics was always the toughest......Oh well, its all fun.....

    I agree with all of your post actually. I interviewed four different Realtor groups to select which would get the listing on our house two months ago. But, I told all four up front that the presentations were competitive, and that three others were being interviewed before we made a selection. That kept all of us honest and up front, with all of the ideas on the table.

    Anyway, good post, Tye.

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