Medical disclosure!

Medical disclosure!

This is a discussion on Medical disclosure! within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am a sixty-one year old man confined to a wheelchair due to multiple sclerosis. I know that someone in my situation is a easy ...

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Thread: Medical disclosure!

  1. #1
    New Member Array rcc413's Avatar
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    Medical disclosure!

    I am a sixty-one year old man confined to a wheelchair due to multiple sclerosis. I know that someone in my situation is a easy target to those of evil intentions. This is one reason that I decided to carry…the other reason is that this is one way that I could protect my family… the only way.
    My worry is that one day that I might need an ambulance when I have no time to safely store my gun in the safe…especially if I blacked-out. I have blacked-out a few times before I carried!
    Have any of you been in this situation? Did the ambulance and/or the hospital staff cause you a problem due to disclosure of your firearm? Did they call the police? How did you handle this situation?
    I would greatly appreciate your advice!
    Thank you!
    rcc413


  2. #2
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    Welcome...

    from Central Florida!

    Don't worry about the firearm...EMT's will handle the firearm, they know what to do and who to call.
    There are some EMT's and cops here who, I'm sure, will add their $.02.

    ret
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  3. #3
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
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    I've come across many accidents and medical emergencies where a weapon was on scene. As long as it's not involved in the incident, we always tried to give it back to a responsible party who was willing and legal to accept it. If not, we secured it for the owner until they were able to recover it. Now if that party died, I have no idea how long or where it would get tied up.
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  4. #4
    Member Array Derrin33's Avatar
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    First off, WELCOME!!
    +1 to what retsup99 said. Most EMTs I know have had some kind of training in case of something like this.
    God Bless America!!

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Array sniper58's Avatar
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    Welcome from Colorado! Most will secure your weapon for the police and the police will contact your people on your emergency list.
    Tim
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  6. #6
    Member Array optikal's Avatar
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    as a paramedic, we were never taught about this, although it brings up a good point. most of the time i see a weapon its with someone i dont want having one. in that case i let the police deem what is appropriate. in the case of a licensed person to carry, i would secure it and leave it with hospital security only after making sure the security officer understands the true circumstances so not to make things difficult for the owner. i would definately keep you CCP CLOSE to the pistol and with it if possible, or at least a note stating you are a permit holder and where your permit is located.
    "If guns cause crime, all of mine are defective."
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  7. #7
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    In most cases if an ambulance is called I would guess the police will be called also.That being the case either the LEO of EMT should secure your weapon until it can be turned over to a authorized person. If it is not discovered until you are at the hospital I'm sure the emergency room personnel will notify the police.

    BTW welcome from Virginia
    Last edited by archer51; October 28th, 2008 at 01:45 AM. Reason: added welcome
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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
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    No way should an untrained paramedic be put in the position of securing a loaded weapon. This is certainly a training issue that needs to be brought up!
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  9. #9
    Member Array optikal's Avatar
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    AZ husker, just out of curiosity, what kind of training. to me each person would be different. i am VERY comfortable with multiple firearms and there safety, some of my coworkers would treat this differently i am sure, but i am curious as to what kind of training is there in securing a weapon. my ideal situation is let the police handle it, but im not willing to sit around and wait for one on scene with a critical patient, and im not going to stop and call for LE enroute if i discover it then.
    "If guns cause crime, all of mine are defective."
    Ted Nugent

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
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    You are in a hurry trying to save lives. Obviously, you're a gun lover or you wouldn't be here. Ask your risk management department what they recommend, I'll bet you open up some eyes! The vast majority of public safety employees would have no idea how to safely handle a handgun, including most Police officers. Unless it's their duty weapon, I'll bet most have never touched a handgun. If there is an officer on the scene (which there usually is), I'd leave it up to them. Let them blow it, it's not your job. In the event that you and your partner are alone, prior to PD's arrival, seek supervisory advise. You CANNOT leave an unsecured weapon on scene, yet you must transport. If it were me, and I could not get approval, I'd safely drop it in an evidence or HAZMAT bag and secure it away from the patient until you can properly hand it off. If you're not aware of "chain of custody" laws, have someone give a class! Best wishes!
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  11. #11
    Member Array snakatack's Avatar
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    Not much of a worry here. 3/4ths of our full time Paramedics and almost half of our ER staff have CCW. permits.

    Heck, we've got a gun safe in the ER. for just that reason.

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
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    CCW

    My agency has no training and no written policy. We usually give it over to the nearest LEO. Luckily there are enough "gun people" working that it's never yet been a problem. To the OP, as long as you're able to carry, do so. If by "black out" you loose control like a diabetic with hypoglycemia or some such, I'd reconsider CCW until it's under control. You surely need to carry if able If you look like the slow Gazelle, the Lions might notice. Welcome to DC!

    To my fellow medics. We developed a training class a while ago that finally was shut down by the brass. The quick and easy version was that no matter what type of firearm, what combination of safety devices, trigger mechanisms, the trigger was ultimately what made it go off and the end with the hole in it was the dangerous end. We taught (or would have if allowed) that even the people who had no gun knowledge at all would be safe if they kept away from the trigger and watched where they pointed the dangerous part. Once you convince the beginners that it won't just go off on it's own in the holster if you look at it too hard I think anyone will be safe, if not comfortable, around a firearm on scene. One other local agency had ben told that if they found a gun in a holster, leave it there as it was the safest place. They would remove the holster from the belt, sometimes with trauma shears, rather than remove the gun and attempt to clear it. I believe this worked one night with an LEO who became combative after a crash in a marked car. He was out of it and reached for a gun that wasn't there after he woke up.

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array tns0038's Avatar
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    I wrecked a motorcycle back in the 80’s, and the EMT and sheriff’s department responded. I was in and out of it, and remembering I have a pistol in my rear pocket was the last thing on my mind. I remember waking up in the emergency room, and the when the nurse undressed me she found the pistol.

    Two days later in ICU, I asked about my pistol, and after a few minutes they returned and said they had given it to a deputy and here was my receipt.

    Long story short, a month or so later I had to travel down to the main sheriffs’ department office, produce my CCL, and receipt, and pick up the pistol.


    Overall, no big deal.

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array HKinNY's Avatar
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    How about one of those medical braclets that people wear that show that they are diabetic ? Inscribe the letters CCW? How about installing a Com safe to the wheel chair?

  15. #15
    New Member Array Practical Use's Avatar
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    I recently had an emergency. I was about to leave for work, and I went dizzy, hit a wall, and split the front of my head open.

    My Colt CCO was on the dining room table. The EMT asked why I had a gun out. I said I was a competitive shooter (I live in the city, and my permit is issued by the county, and I did not choose to mention the permit - the city does not need to know!).

    The EMT asked if it was OK to clear my gun. I said sure, "Just don't point it at me when you do."

    My girlfriend showed up. They took me and left her to lock up the house and make sure the gun was secure.

    To them, once they were sure I was not some nut case, they did not really care. I live in a really nice city - one of the EMT's called later in the day to see if I was OK.

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