I Had to Shoot - Page 3

I Had to Shoot

This is a discussion on I Had to Shoot within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by CleaningAccident 1. Disarm the BGs lifeless body. Preferably by kicking the weapon away from him so as not to leave your prints ...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 34 of 34

Thread: I Had to Shoot

  1. #31
    Senior Member Array gddyup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Derry, NH
    Posts
    988
    Quote Originally Posted by CleaningAccident
    1. Disarm the BGs lifeless body. Preferably by kicking the weapon away from him so as not to leave your prints on his weapon.
    2. Inform any witnesses not to touch anything and to remain at the scene until Police arrive. (This is best accomplished while still holding your weapon of "self defense"). Remove magazine, open breach and place weapon on the ground within your reach. Do NOT discuss the incident with any witnesses.
    3. Dial 911 immediately and report a shooting and give the location. Repeat the report and location, then hang up. Do NOT converse with the 911 dispatcher. The dispatcher will call back. Answer no questions other than the location and your name. Hang up.
    Your call is being recorded.
    Your call is being recorded.
    Your call is being recorded.
    4. Make note of the location of your casings and the body and ask witnesses to do the same.
    5. Call your attorney.
    6. When the officers arrive, state "everything happened so fast, I was in fear for my life". Repeat this until the officers are tired of asking you. Do not even admit to being the shooter. DO NOT testIFY TO THE OFFICERS.
    7. Do NOT discuss the incident with anyone, at anytime, before you speak to your attorney. ANYTHING that you say to ANYONE, other than your attorney, will absolutely be used as evidence AGAINST you.

    I disagree with a couple things here.

    1.) NEVER get close to the BG. Keep him/her covered from an advantagous position. Approach puts you in a bad position! If you shot him/her, you shot for a reason. The BG is down and you are now in a position of advantage. Don't give it up!

    2.) NEVER disarm yourself before help has arrived! Wait until PD is on-scene and then follow their commands. You may be able to re-holster as they are arriving and if that's the scenario then do so. DO NOT relenquish control of your weapon until help has arrived! When PD is on scene make it known that you are the victim and keep your hands where they can be seen. No sudden movements!

    3.) Make sure you are the one who calls for help. Tell them who you are, what you look like, and what you are wearing. Make it known that YOU are the victim and have used your weapon in defense of your life. Say nothing more.

    4.) The only thing you say to the PD when they arrive on scene is that your are the victim and fired in defense of your life. You feared for your life. NEVER say you thought or anything even close to that. You WERE in fear of your life. Say nothing else and then contact your lawyer.


    Everything else in this post sounds like good advice.
    Firefighter/EMT
    "You've never lived until you've almost died. For those who fight for it, life has a flavor the protected will never know" - T.R.

    <----My LT was unhappy that I did not have my PASS-Tag at that fire. But I found the body so he said he would overlook it. :)


  2. #32
    Member Array Kahrma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    39
    One thing I haven't seen mentioned, but that was suggested by an instructor in one of the CCW courses I attended -

    Ask to be seen by a physician, regardless of wether or not you've been physically injured. Inform the officer that you don't feel well and need to see a doctor. This will most likely be true, given the gravity of the situation, adrenaline dump, etc. As far as life events go, a self-defense shooting is pretty high up on stress meter. LEO's and other armed professionals often require medical/psychological support following traumatic calls - a civilian would be even more likely to.

    What do you tell the doctor? Pretty much the same thing that you tell an officer - that you can't discuss any details until you've spoken to your lawyer, but that you've just been through a traumatic event and feel physically ill.

    Another thing I have'nt heard mentioned - remember that 911 calls are recorded. Get on the phone as soon as possible and stay on until help arrives. In some situations (home invasion?) you may be able to get on the phone before shots are even fired. The recorded call could document exchanges leading up to the shooting which could help with your defense (Go away! I'm armed and I will shoot! Do not come through that door! GO AWAY!). After the shooting, ask for an ambulance for the BG - you're still dealing with a human life, no matter what the BG was doing 2 seconds before the trigger was pulled.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Array gddyup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Derry, NH
    Posts
    988
    If you do decide to see your doctor, which is another very good point made here, then you could, in confidence, relate more of the issue of thevent with him to help you "climb down the ladder" from the stress. Doctor-Patient privelage should cover you in any legal matter. What you say to your doctor will not be used against you in court.

    Doctor-Patient Privelage
    Firefighter/EMT
    "You've never lived until you've almost died. For those who fight for it, life has a flavor the protected will never know" - T.R.

    <----My LT was unhappy that I did not have my PASS-Tag at that fire. But I found the body so he said he would overlook it. :)

  4. #34
    Member Array Bryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    334
    All good advice. I would add it is your responsibility to keep your weapon secure until you are properly relieved of it by the LE's. If there is no treat probably a good idea to re-holster and let the LE's dis-arm you while you hands are up(tell them you have a permit and where the gun is on your body). Also if you can take several deep breaths and review (in your mind)what exactly happened as psychological trauma can make the events fuzzy after time has passed. Do not write anything down that would be evidence. This is just my opinion that is in addition to the previous advice given. Unfortunately Doctor-Patient Privileges have been compromised before so be careful if you decide to talk.
    -Diplomacy: The art of saying nice dogie until you can find a rock.
    -The truth is a three edged sword.
    -Your brain is your primary weapon everything else is just a tool.
    -When the only tool you have is a hammer then everything starts to look like a nail.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Road Rage Good Shoot / Bad Shoot
    By Hot Wing in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: July 13th, 2010, 06:54 PM
  2. Simple Shoot - No Shoot test Online
    By First Sgt in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 265
    Last Post: July 12th, 2010, 04:18 PM
  3. Interesting shoot no shoot at the local Wally World.
    By Riccur in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: January 27th, 2010, 12:47 PM
  4. Good Shoot/Bad shoot? Pastor Killed
    By Rustynuts in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 3rd, 2009, 09:50 PM
  5. To shoot or not to shoot...ammo shortage
    By wormy in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: June 15th, 2009, 04:51 AM

Search tags for this page

i had to shoot defensivecarry

Click on a term to search for related topics.