Studied, trained, have permit, am I ready?

This is a discussion on Studied, trained, have permit, am I ready? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I am well on my way in becoming qualified and responsible in my quest to carry a concealed pistol. My question is this: How qualified ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Studied, trained, have permit, am I ready?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    1,644

    Studied, trained, have permit, am I ready?

    I am well on my way in becoming qualified and responsible in my quest to carry a concealed pistol. My question is this: How qualified do I need to be to safely carry a concealed pistol?

    I am fairly new to shooting, but here is what I have done in the past 6 months:

    -obtained permit
    -obtained G19 and supertuck
    -learned safe handling and operation
    -joined range, practiced often
    -studied my State's laws on concealed carry
    -studied my State's laws on use of force
    -studied (a limited amount) Federal firearm law
    -Fired 500 rounds of plinker ammo through my Glock
    -Fired 100 rounds of Federal HST (what I intend to carry)

    -Thought about and improved my situational awareness and avoidance skills
    -Swallowed my ego
    -tried to think through scenarios where I might have to draw or fire my pistol
    -come to terms with the possibility of shooting or killing someone
    -anticipated the effects of adrenaline and stress on my skills
    -voraciously studied DefensiveCarry.com!


    My shooting skills are not fabulous, but are decent and I am improving. I have been through a few coachings and they have helped greatly. I can reliable print every round on a paper plate at 7 yards or a NRA slow fire pistol target (3 foot square) at 25 yards. I am not going to win any medals for speed, but I am reliable.

    I am not looking for anyone's permission or a green light to carry. What I am looking for is any training or info that I have missed or shortcomings in the training I have done.

    Any suggestions?

    Would you trust me to be sitting next to you in a restaurant?

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,399
    You are doing well and probably start carrying but I would suggest looking for some type of class to go too.
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array havegunjoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,206
    You need to fire at least 501 rounds of plinker ammo and 110 rounds of Federal ammo. (Just kidding) Was any of your "LEARNING" or "STUDYING" from a qualified or certified instructor? What does WA require? If nothing, than I guess you are "QUALIFIED" by their standard. The learning process never stops however.
    DEMOCRACY IS TWO WOLVES AND A LAMB VOTING ON WHAT TO HAVE FOR LUNCH. LIBERTY IS A WELL ARMED LAMB CONtestING THE VOTE.

    Certified Instructor for Minnesota Carry Permit
    NRA Pistol and Personal Protection Insrtuctor
    Utah Permit Certified Instructor

  5. #4
    Member Array ImChad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The Great State of Indiana
    Posts
    136
    Gees, you've got me beat by far. In Indiana you don't have to jump through any hoops at all. I went to the police station, filled out paper work that THEY filled out for me, paid 50.00 and walked out. three weeks later I recieved my permit in the mail. For an extra 50 I could have (and will next time) gotten a LIFETIME permit. With, no training at all. I carry most all of the time and I did all my training by going to the shooting range and asking the old timers questions. then, I spend time at home dry firing. I've lobbed 10,000 rounds in the last year and I'm a great shot. If something should happen where I need to defend myself, I'm more than confident that I'll only hit my target.

    Now, as far as a restaurant goes, I don't care what my fellow hoosiers think. I'm not out to defend anyone but my family. I know this is brash, and somewhat bluntly rude to say, but I have no desire to protect anyone but those i'm responsible for. You never know in a split second who the victim and the attacker really is. I may see someone holding a gun out who looks like a criminal but my just be defending thierself. In a restaurant setting, my first action will be to try and flee if something goes wrong. I refuse to protect those who don't feel the need to protect theirself.
    They can't take your right to own a firearm. They can ask with force and you can answer any way you choose.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Array dunndw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    1,123
    Never stop learning.
    I've been carrying for 10+ years and I STILL take classes. Take them from different instructors...everyone teaches differently.
    Look for a NRA Personal Protection Inside the Home and Outside the Home classes in your area. Those will help with your situational awareness and help in training you in the basics of shooting from retention, from cover, etc.

    Always be a student
    "If I was an extremist, our founding fathers would all be extremists," he said. "Without them, we wouldn't have our independence. We'd be a disarmed British system of feudal subjectivity."

  7. #6
    Ex Member Array AVIVIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    192
    I think you are probably more prepared than many. (not many HERE, many in general). But big props for taking the responsibility.

    You could stand to put a lot more ammo down range, but its good for now, just keep training as long as you are comfortable and confident with your weapon.

    The things that are more difficult to train for are the one that you will experience in real life. Moving targets, people shooting back, distractions. Get someone to throw fire crackers at you or something. If you have your own space to shoot, you can make a fairly simple moving target rig.

    I think you're good to go. Have confidence and trust yourself.

  8. #7
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    yes
    Posts
    1,644
    Quote Originally Posted by ImChad View Post
    Gees, you've got me beat by far. In Indiana you don't have to jump through any hoops at all.
    Well, it's $55.25 here for the permit but there are no training requirements. As far as the State of Washington is concerned I am qualified. This is more for my own standards.

    I have taken a basic NRA pistol class. I may sign up for some more classes as time and $ allow.

    I plan to keep training, just looking for more suggestions...

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,164
    There is no finish line, but you thus far have the right mindset. Read "In the Gravest Extreme" by Ayoob and/or "The Concealed Carry Handbook" by Byrd.
    Spend few minutes learning about my journey from Zero to Athlete in this mini documentary!
    Then check out my blog! www.BodyByMcDonalds.com

    Cupcake - 100 pound loser, adventurer, Ironman Triathlete.

  10. #9
    jfl
    jfl is offline
    Distinguished Member Array jfl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Palm Beach County, FL
    Posts
    1,485
    I don't think we are ever ready; we train, think, train more, read, but it is only when the SHTF that we find out.
    I hope to never find out !!!

    A required reading for my students is: Principles of Self Defense by Jeff Cooper; it does not discuss techniques but mind-set, which I believe is paramount.

    I am not really qualified to give you advice, I'll just quote Andy Stanford of OPS:
    -avoidance
    -de-escalation
    -deterrence
    The first rule of a gunfight: "Don't be there !"
    The second rule: "Bring enough gun"

    jfl
    (NRA Life Member/Instructor - GOA - IDPA - GSSF - ex-IHMSA)

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    4,244
    Congratulations on your dedication and realization of the tremendous responsibility of carry. I'd suggest starting to carry right now and forget it's there. Many new guys are continually checking their weapon by feeling, looking in mirrors or windows as they pass, or tugging on their cover garments. Just let the proper concealment tools do their job. Becoming comfortable with the gun on your side is the best thing you can do right now.
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  12. #11
    VIP Member
    Array GunnyBunny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Victoria, B.C.
    Posts
    3,887
    Check out Firearms Academy of Seattle, Inc. 360-978-6100 . After reading about the experiences of others I plan on going there myself when time (and $) allows. One of their guest instructors is Massad Ayoob.
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array AllAmerican's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chesterfield, Kakalaki del Sur
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Husker View Post
    Congratulations on your dedication and realization of the tremendous responsibility of carry. I'd suggest starting to carry right now and forget it's there. Many new guys are continually checking their weapon by feeling, looking in mirrors or windows as they pass, or tugging on their cover garments. Just let the proper concealment tools do their job. Becoming comfortable with the gun on your side is the best thing you can do right now.
    I like this advice alot so thanks.

  14. #13
    Senior Member Array PointnClick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    721
    Wow, Nutz... this coulda been my post. I have a little experience on you and I've about doubled what you have shot at the range, but otherwise, this is me... I've talked to my wife extensively about this decision, and the more you think about the responsibility, the heavier that pistol really is.

    Know what I have learned...? You and I have begun a 21st century martial art... no different than fencing, Roman wrestling, or karate... our art is the same. A thousand years ago, this was the way of the sword. You and I have learned the basic blocks, attacks, and parries of our martial art. Mental discipline, muscle memory, tactics, learning new maneuvers, and further study will be required, and only practice and work will make us Masters...

    So let's tighten up the knots on these White Belts of ours and get back out on the mat for some easy throws...

    "Who is to say that I am not an instrument of karma? Indeed, who is to say that I am not the very hand of God himself, dispatched by the Almighty to smite the Philistines and hypocrites, to lay low the dishonest and corrupt, and to bust the jawbone of some jackass that so desperately deserves it?"

  15. #14
    Senior Member Array jualdeaux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Waponi Woo
    Posts
    1,045
    There is a lot of good suggestions listed so far. i especially agree with the "take a defensive handgun class, read some of the books listed and just start to carry and get used to it being there."

    My only added suggestion would be to practice at more than just a static range, specifically something like IDPA. I'll never say that it is a replacement for proper training, it isn't, but it does let you practice things like drawing from concealment, shooting in various positions, shooting on the move, etc. It is also much more fun. At least to me.
    Bend the knees, smooth is fast, watch the front sight.

  16. #15
    Member Array detroit9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    123
    Nobody knows if they are ready until the moment comes. I would suggest you take as many classes as you can reasonably afford. Choose classes put on by qualified trainers. I always strongly suggest a good force-on-force class that will put you through some scenarios. You will be suprised how differently you react while under stress. You may be a great marksman while standing on the range but things change when you are moving, getting shot at, etc. Never stop training. The day you think you are fully prepared is the day you quit learning.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Have you trained for malfunctions like this?
    By mercop in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: September 15th, 2009, 03:40 PM
  2. The myth of the highly trained LEO?
    By Chiller2 in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: July 20th, 2009, 10:40 PM
  3. Anyone trained by Massad Ayoob? $800 for 40 hrs
    By 1boredguy in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: December 27th, 2008, 11:49 PM
  4. Even trained LEO's can forget the RULES:
    By JonInNY in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 3rd, 2008, 07:46 PM
  5. US firefighters being trained to spot terrorists
    By Janq in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: December 3rd, 2007, 12:30 AM

Search tags for this page

how do i know im ready for my permit

Click on a term to search for related topics.