Competent To Carry?!

Competent To Carry?!

This is a discussion on Competent To Carry?! within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I pose this more as a challenge than a question. Since it's something I've dealt with regularly over the past 8 years, I've become especially ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Competent To Carry?!

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array JimmyC4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Minnesnowta
    Posts
    2,034

    Competent To Carry?!

    I pose this more as a challenge than a question. Since it's something I've dealt with regularly over the past 8 years, I've become especially sensitive to the fact that there are times when I, and you, should NOT be carrying due to some personal limitations.

    Let me set the stage with my situation. Since 2000, I've been through numerous therapies in treatment of multiple myeloma (cancer of the bone marrow). There are times when I am unsteady, mentally fuzzy, weak, and even somewhat confused ("chemo brain") to the point where I have to make the decision that I should not carry. I do that not only in the face of outrageous liability, but in recognition that when carrying I have incredible responsibility to make decisions and physically perform at my highest in order to avoid causing harm to innocents.

    It's not just major illness that should take any of us out of the "carry pool"--even a severe head cold or similar illness can affect our decision-making and reactions to the point where we could cause more harm than good. Medications are another culprit, sometimes bringing with them drowsiness, slow reaction, even mild disorientation or confusion.

    So, I challenge you, when you just don't feel "up to it", make the tough decision to disarm, knowing that just like there are times to put down the car keys, there are times to put down the EDC.


  2. #2
    Member Array gilliland87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    phx, az
    Posts
    328

    Well said

    I too have certain times I make the choice to not carry, some are medical related emergency situations, others are personal reasons either way though it is a choice to be made everytime. Glad to see another post reminding us all of the responsibility we carry.

  3. #3
    Member Array bigiceman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    491
    I agree that there are times when we have to be honest with ourselves and put the firearms away until the time is correct to bring them back out. That is being a responsible gun owner, and a responsible person. We have to know our limitations and not just bull through. If we cannot think clearly or perform properly there is no reason for us to put on our firearms. They will do more harm then good in those situations.
    But if you are authorized to carry a weapon, and you walk outside without it, just take a deep breath, and say this to yourself...
    "Baa."
    LTC(RET) Dave Grossman

    Revolutionary War Veterans Association Shooter Qualification: Cook

  4. #4
    VIP Member
    Array Pistology's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    South Coast LA Cty
    Posts
    2,103

    Key Rule of Gun Safety

    Use your head. Due to need to focus serious intent and to sucure and to retain the firearm and to avoid the most common cause of accident - human error, do as my HCP instructor emphasized: "Never handle a firearm when physiologically or emotionally impaired". I draw the line at my sleepiest time of day much less if I'm definitely ill. At those times, I'm looking for a reason not to handle a firearm. Knowing when to resort to a firearm ultimately means knowing when not to.
    Jimmy, you have the kind of fight that doesn't involve a firearm, and you have my support. Remember the will to survive is powerful and that you can make it. I hope that you get all of the help that you need to win your fight.
    Americans understood the right of self-preservation as permitting a citizen to repel force by force
    when the intervention of society... may be too late to prevent an injury.
    -Blackstone’s Commentaries 145–146, n. 42 (1803) in District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008)

  5. #5
    Ex Member Array JOHNSMITH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    somewhere
    Posts
    1,726
    Absolutely. It's an issue of personal responsibility. Just as you wouldn't attempt to drive you car home after downing a few too many shots at the bar, I would hope no one would try to carry when they are too "fuzzy" to do so. This is when having friends or a significant other licensed to carry comes in handy.

  6. #6
    Member Array JohnHenry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Willis, TX
    Posts
    119
    Good comments. We have a Harley group that stresses safety, particularly when riding in groups, and this is one of the things we teach as well. There are just some times when you shouldn't get on a bike. I think your arguments for carrying are the same and equally valid.
    __________________________________
    Harley rider
    Kimber CDP II Compact, SA XD SC40, Ruger LCP

    Favorites: "If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a soldier."
    Admiral Gary Roughead, CNO: "I never, ever, want to see my sailors or Marines in a fair fight."

  7. #7
    Member Array glock45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    384
    I only leave my firearm at home when I know I will be drinking or when going to the doctor. If I am just having a casual beer, I still carry.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    27,090
    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyC4 View Post
    So, I challenge you, when you just don't feel "up to it", make the tough decision to disarm, knowing that just like there are times to put down the car keys, there are times to put down the EDC.
    Everyone has such times, now and then. But, for me, if I'm not feeling up to carrying, then frankly I'm not feeling well enough to be out and about.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array preachertim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    742
    I felt bad the other day while driving and I pulled over and let my wife drive.
    The next thing I did was take off my Kahr CW40 and put it in the glove Box. I felt it was the safe thing to do.
    Why Would A Preacher ever need a Gun? Its Not for the Sheep , its for the Wolves!

    Springfield Armory Service XD 40
    Taurus PT 1911 45 acp Taurus PT 101, PT 92
    Ruger 22/45 Ruger P95 9mm, Ruger SR9
    Kahr CW 40, Heritage 22, Rossi 38 special

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Cthulhu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Brevard County, FL
    Posts
    1,154
    Some of this argument may have been covered in this thread:

    CCW with medical condition Yes/No? - DefensiveCarry Concealed Carry Forum

    If you're not responsible enough to know when you shouldn't be carrying due to a medical condition, then you shouldn't be carrying, period. But it's the shooter's responsibility to make that judgment.

    -JT

  11. #11
    Member Array OldFatMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Golden
    Posts
    34
    Jimmy- I think you are right on! After having surgery for a knee replacement, I put my carry weapon in the safe until I got off of the pain meds. Being responsible means knowing when you are impaired and taking the proper action.
    I don't carry a gun because I feel inadequate.

    I carry a gun because unarmed and facing three armed thugs, I am inadequate.

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    3,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu View Post
    Some of this argument may have been covered in this thread:

    CCW with medical condition Yes/No? - DefensiveCarry Concealed Carry Forum

    If you're not responsible enough to know when you shouldn't be carrying due to a medical condition, then you shouldn't be carrying, period. But it's the shooter's responsibility to make that judgment.

    -JT

    Very good comments on the other thread, a good read.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

    NRA Member

  13. #13
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,502
    I only partially agree. For instance in a scenario similar to this one posted above.

    "I felt bad the other day while driving and I pulled over and let my wife drive.
    The next thing I did was take off my Kahr CW40 and put it in the glove Box. I felt it was the safe thing to do."


    You are driving or you are somewhere/anywhere and you are feeling "bad" dizzy, disoriented, possibly "judgment impaired" for whatever the reason (an adverse reaction to medication.) whatever.

    You have a firearm on your person. It is safely holstered.
    That is a GREAT time just to leave it alone and NOT touch it until you get home or until you are feeling back to normal.
    If your firearm is already properly holstered it does not know that you are feeling dizzy or disoriented.
    Leave it alone until you don't feel dizzy anymore.

    Sometimes...It is far more dangerous to handle your firearm than to just leave it alone.

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    3,194
    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    I only partially agree. For instance in a scenario similar to this one posted above.

    "I felt bad the other day while driving and I pulled over and let my wife drive.
    The next thing I did was take off my Kahr CW40 and put it in the glove Box. I felt it was the safe thing to do."


    You are driving or you are somewhere/anywhere and you are feeling "bad" dizzy, disoriented, possibly "judgment impaired" for whatever the reason (an adverse reaction to medication.) whatever.

    You have a firearm on your person. It is safely holstered.
    That is a GREAT time just to leave it alone and NOT touch it until you get home or until you are feeling back to normal.
    If your firearm is already properly holstered it does not know that you are feeling dizzy or disoriented.
    Leave it alone until you don't feel dizzy anymore.

    Sometimes...It is far more dangerous to handle your firearm than to just leave it alone.
    Good point, handling it once you have an (issue) may contribute to an ND. Best to wait for it to pass if possible or wait until someone trusted can be of help.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

    NRA Member

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array hogdaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    N/E Florida
    Posts
    3,301
    [QUOTE=ccw9mm Everyone has such times, now and then. But, for me, if I'm not feeling up to carrying, then frankly I'm not feeling well enough to be out and about) +1 agree 100 %

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Least Competent Criminals
    By Sheldon J in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 20th, 2008, 01:26 PM
  2. Define Competent
    By Blackhawk6 in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: August 25th, 2006, 02:22 PM