Requiring my real estate agents to carry...

This is a discussion on Requiring my real estate agents to carry... within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Every one needs to be safe, I'm betting he removes it to keep clients from getting all weird on him should they see it, and ...

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 73

Thread: Requiring my real estate agents to carry...

  1. #46
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Battle Creek, Mi.
    Posts
    2,285

    Lightbulb Good for you!!

    Every one needs to be safe, I'm betting he removes it to keep clients from getting all weird on him should they see it, and possibly loose a sale...

    Which in my opinion is a real bad idea... Concealed means concealed, they would never see it if he properly has it stowed, and they are safer to boot....
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #47
    Member Array glock45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    384
    I never show a property or hold an open house without my G30SF .45 or my Ruger SP 101 .357 in my hip. Actually, I do not leave my home without a gun in my hip.
    G21SF, G30, G36, Ruger SP101 DAO, S&W 642

  4. #48
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781

    Sarah Anne Walker was found slain on the floor of a home she'd hoped to sell

    As originally reported by WFAA.com:

    At Death's Door

    Sarah Anne Walker was found slain on the floor of a home she'd hoped to sell.

    12:00 AM CDT on Thursday, July 13, 2006
    By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

    The slaying of a McKinney Real Estate saleswoman last weekend brought back painful memories for Joan Malone.

    In 1997, the Coppell Realtor was attacked and left for dead while showing a home.

    "We're all talking about this" latest assault on a home sales agent, Ms. Malone said. "There are people out there with bad intentions."

    "The only thing you can do is go with your gut feeling, and if it doesn't feel right, get out of there," she said.

    Between 1982 and 2000, more than 200 U.S. real estate agents were killed on the job, according to a safety report published by the Kentucky Real Estate Commission. Untold other agents were raped or mugged.

    On Saturday, prospective buyers who stopped to tour a McKinney model home found Sarah Anne Walker's body. She had been stabbed more than two dozen times. Police are sifting through clues to find her assailant.

    In 2002, at least four sales agents were robbed at gunpoint while showing homes in North Dallas.

    And not all attacks get publicity.

    In an industry that depends on one-on-one contact, sales agents know that they must be wary of the wrong kind of person.

    "If only we knew what an attacker looks like that's the problem," said Sherryl Wesson, an office manager for Dallas-based Ebby Halliday Realtors. "You have to be on guard all the time."

    To keep sales agents safe, Ms. Wesson said her firm asks prospects who want to see a home to meet at the agent's office and provide identification. And agents are discouraged from working alone at an open house.

    "We always like for them to have someone accompany them at an open house," she said. "You can't be a sitting duck."

    Open houses have always been problematic for agents. Along with the prospect of an assault, there is the potential for theft.

    "We've had some situations where medications were stolen, and we always caution homeowners to put things away," Ms. Wesson said. "A lot of sellers don't want their homes held open for this very reason."

    Real estate agent Harriet Shaw often sits in her car at a house tour, which gives her the chance to scope out a customer before unlocking the front door.

    Ms. Shaw said open houses can be a "setup to get hurt," but many agents are willing to take the risk to sell a property.

    "You have to have your radar on," she warned. "I've refused to show properties if the person doesn't seem right."

    Ms. Malone, who was attacked almost 10 years ago, didn't have an inkling of the danger she faced when she met a client at her office to shop for houses. Earlier she had shown several homes to the man from Euless.

    But while touring a house in Coppell, he suddenly attacked Ms. Malone, stabbing and beating her. He left her bleeding on the floor, stole jewelry and fled in her Mercedes-Benz.

    Police later captured Carl Joseph Raspante in Missouri. He pleaded guilty to attempted capital murder and got 40 years in prison.

    Ms. Malone said that even with widespread publicity about such attacks, agents remain vulnerable.

    "I read a lot of things people put out about safety, but obviously they have never worked out in the field," she said. "We are all self-employed people, and we can't have someone baby-sit us all the time.

    "All you can do is take every precaution you can take."

    Still, the industry tries to play it safe. Real estate commissions and local associates regularly offer security training to agents and publish brochures with safety tips.

    Some builders have installed electronic safeguards.

    "We have a security system in every one of our models, and our agents also have panic buttons," said Robin Rigby, corporate director for Darling Homes. "The people who install our equipment say their phones are ringing off the hook."

    Still, Ms. Rigby said it is often necessary for salespeople to work by themselves.

    "Everyone is on high alert right now, and we are looking at what additional steps we can take," she said.

    Adella Woods, who was holding a tour Wednesday for agents at a northeast Dallas home, said security concerns are a growing issue with the industry.

    "It's getting more and more dangerous," Ms. Woods, an agent with Ebby Halliday, said. "If someone walks in off the street, you don't know anything about them."

    That's why she discourages clients from holding open houses.

    "If a home is priced properly, it doesn't need an open house," she said.

    Convincing clients can be tough, though. Sellers' surveys consistently cite open houses as among the most important marketing tools.

    It's been that way for decades.

    "Our industry is focused on doing the same old thing the same old way," Ms. Shaw said. "But no one wants to get hurt.

    "When something happens like this, it's an opportunity for all of us to be reminded of the dangers."

    The report can be found at; Real Estate Agents are being killed, stabbed, mugged, raped during Open Houses on the job


    Additional reading on this subject can be found at the following:

    Every Realtor's Nightmare: Part 1
    by Mark Spencer
    Editors Note: This article was originally published on November 10, 1997.

    This four-part series focuses on the personal safety issues facing the real estate professional as illustrated by the disturbing experiences and subsequent coping responses of two Realtors who each were viciously attacked while showing homes to what they assumed were prospective buyers. One stayed in the real estate business, determined to educate other Realtors how to protect themselves from similar crimes. The other left the profession, too traumatized by her ordeal to return. Also included in Mark Spencer's informative series are life-saving tips for how Realtors -- who assume considerable risk every day -- can avoid becoming the next tragic statistic. Parts 1-4 will run in installments today through Thursday this week.
    Realty Times - Every Realtor's Nightmare: Part 1

    - Janq

    Note:
    It does not matter whether the realtor be female or male.
    Whether there be a multiple of realtors at the property and they be all female, all male, or some mix of gender and even age.
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  5. #49
    Distinguished Member Array JerryM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,967
    The title of the thread and the statement, "I think I'm going to require any agents that have their CWL and work for me to carry." is confusing if you are not going to require them to carry.

    Regards,
    Jerry

  6. #50
    Ex Member Array jahwarrior72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    the raggedy edge
    Posts
    1,438
    Quote Originally Posted by ccroom View Post
    I have a real estate investment company.
    If I haven't sold the property before I'm finished I turn it over to a real estate agent to sell it.
    It just so happens my agent has his CWL and has had it since 2003.
    He was at one of my houses doing an open house today so I stopped by to talk.
    I've really been pushing him to carry more, he usually keeps his gun under his car seat.
    We started talking guns, so he went out to his car to get his .32 and 380.
    He usually carries the .32 in a fanny pack positioned at 12 o'clock.
    When we finished talking and I was leaving he started out the door with his guns to put them back in his car.
    I said: "What are you doing?" "Put that back on." He did.
    I think I'm going to require any agents that have their CWL and work for me to carry.
    Too many times we see employers keeping their employees's from carrying.
    We have had instances here lately where realtors are kidnapped and taken to the ATM machine.
    It's just a matter of time before one of them pulls the trigger.

    jeez, i wished i could find a boss like you! i wonder if your agents will ever understand the importance of the decision you just made.

  7. #51
    Member Array mrtwice99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by bwollard View Post
    I too agree that a requirement might be a little much, but a strong recommendation and paying for their class might help out :>)
    Exactly! Strongly recommend that they carry and be willing to pay for the class and the ammo. Anyone who is remotely interested will probably take you up on it. Those that aren't interested you probably don't want carrying anyway. I agree with the other posters that some people are just not cut out for carrying.

  8. #52
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Franklin, VA
    Posts
    5,127
    Maybe you could start a pizza delivery store. I hear some delivery folks might like your policy.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  9. #53
    Member Array tflhndn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    407
    If you even decide to invest in real estate in NC and need a REALTOR, give me a call - I ALWAYS CARRY!!!

  10. #54
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Battle Creek, Mi.
    Posts
    2,285

    Talking On a side note...

    Last summer I had new roof installed on my apartment building, N when I found out the guy I was contracting to do the work had a CCW... I told him I expected him to carry his gun while on the job......
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century

  11. #55
    Member Array AgentX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    476
    Encouraging ccw seems, to me, like an invitation for a suit by someone who finds it creates a "threatening" work environment. I'd leave it untouched.

    If anyone mentions to you that they carry or asks if you have a problem with them carrying, by all means support them in their doing so. I sure wouldn't encourage it for the realtors in general.

    You might, however, have some sort of comprehensive safety and security briefing. Mention the types of safety issues/threats your agents might face and talk about awareness and countermeasures, possibly ending with "use of appropriate self-defense measures" if there's an imminent threat which can't be evaded. Make sure they're aware of risk and that you care about their well-being on and off the job, whether they carry a gun or not.

  12. #56
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Battle Creek, Mi.
    Posts
    2,285
    Quote Originally Posted by AgentX View Post
    Encouraging ccw seems, to me, like an invitation for a suit by someone who finds it creates a "threatening" work environment. I'd leave it untouched.

    If anyone mentions to you that they carry or asks if you have a problem with them carrying, by all means support them in their doing so. I sure wouldn't encourage it for the realtors in general.

    You might, however, have some sort of comprehensive safety and security briefing. Mention the types of safety issues/threats your agents might face and talk about awareness and countermeasures, possibly ending with "use of appropriate self-defense measures" if there's an imminent threat which can't be evaded. Make sure they're aware of risk and that you care about their well-being on and off the job, whether they carry a gun or not.
    To which I would reply it is within the letter of he law, and if you do not like it then you are welcome to and I encourager you seek employment someplace else...

    However a real good boss would pay for a gun (range) membership, and have a ammo expenditure reimbursement program, say of 100 rounds a month... With bonus's for those with high range scores!!
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century

  13. #57
    Member Array ccroom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Choctaw,OK
    Posts
    264
    Good idea Sheldon J. Wouldn't it be awesome to be able write that off as a business exspense.
    "You cannot invade mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind each blade of grass." - Admiral Yamamoto

  14. #58
    jp
    jp is offline
    Member Array jp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    16
    I'm an agent in Dallas. I always carry when I show and during open houses. Just too many opportunities for BG to get you in a bad place all alone. Just hope I don;tget pulled over and outed in front of a client. I'm usually xrtra carefull with a client in the car but you never know.
    Ultra Raptor

  15. #59
    Member Array tflhndn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by jp View Post
    I'm an agent in Dallas. I always carry when I show and during open houses. Just too many opportunities for BG to get you in a bad place all alone. Just hope I don;tget pulled over and outed in front of a client. I'm usually xrtra carefull with a client in the car but you never know.
    That's been my biggest fear to date....

    The biggest pain the arse has been when the buyers want to eat lunch somewhere that serves booze - it gets interesting to make excuses to go back to the car and drop the EDC in the trunk without getting made... (no carry where alcohol is sold for onsite consumption)...

  16. #60
    Member Array user's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Northern Piedmont of Va. & Middle of Nowhere, W.Va.
    Posts
    386
    You'd best call your insurance company to find out how to manage that issue. They're not going to like being liable for those agents if the agents have a negligent discharge that kills the neighbors' baby while working for you under orders to carry a gun.

    If you can show that they've got the training necessary to handle a gun properly, then perhaps you can get a rider that will cover you. Otherwise, you'll lose your business and maybe your house if some agent has a momentary stupid-attack, because the insurance company will deny your claim on the ground that you failed to advise them of the excessive risk.
    Daniel L. Hawes - 540 347 2430 - HTTP://www.VirginiaLegalDefense.com

    Nothing I say as "user" should be taken as either advertising for attorney services or legal advice. Legal questions should be presented to a competent attorney licensed to practice in the relevant state.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Bad: Real estate agents killed UPDATED
    By msgt/ret in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: September 26th, 2010, 11:25 AM
  2. Real Estate - How do you enter vacant properities?
    By Joey Diesel in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: December 27th, 2009, 12:03 AM
  3. Anyone know real estate?
    By XD in SC in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: February 26th, 2008, 05:51 PM
  4. Real-Estate Agents Please Help
    By 4my sons in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 22nd, 2007, 12:08 PM
  5. I picked the right real estate agent!
    By Squawker in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: June 16th, 2007, 01:49 PM

Search tags for this page

can a real estate broker carry a gun in florida
,

ccw for real estate agent

,

ccw realtor

,

concealed carry real estate agent

,

concealed carry real estate agents

,

real estate agent concealed carry

,
real estate agents concealed carry
,
realtor agent concealed gun shot
,
realtor and conceal carry
,

realtor ccw

,

realtor concealed carry

,

realtors ccw

Click on a term to search for related topics.