Texas Senate authorizes students, professors to carry guns on campus - Page 3

Texas Senate authorizes students, professors to carry guns on campus

This is a discussion on Texas Senate authorizes students, professors to carry guns on campus within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Total Votes = 1709 Yes, given the recent violence at schools this legislation makes sense 9.303 % Yes, students, teachers, visitors should be able to ...

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Thread: Texas Senate authorizes students, professors to carry guns on campus

  1. #31
    Senior Member Array Chevyguy85's Avatar
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    Total Votes = 1709
    Yes, given the recent violence at schools this legislation makes sense
    9.303 %
    Yes, students, teachers, visitors should be able to defend themselves
    38.97 %
    No, this is insane legislation
    29.13 %
    No, it will only lead to more violence
    22.58 %


  2. #32
    Distinguished Member Array ErnieNWillis's Avatar
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    Now lets make a serious push for open carry!

  3. #33
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Lets hope the politicians dont look at that poll. That is 51.71% against it!
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

  4. #34
    Member Array Greybeard's Avatar
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    What was in my "Inbox" this morning:

    --- On Fri, 5/22/09, W. Scott Lewis <scott@lewiscr.com> wrote:

    From: W. Scott Lewis <scott@lewiscr.com>
    Subject: Texas Senate Bill 1164 (Clarifications and a Final Update)
    Date: Friday, May 22, 2009, 1:09 AM

    Attention Texas Supporters of Concealed Carry on Campus:

    Thank you for bearing with us yesterday as we sent out more SB 1164 updates than most people could keep up with. As you probably noticed, the updates were put out in such rapid succession and passed through so many hands (NRA to TSRA to SCCC to me to you) that some of the notices picked up errors along the way (i.e., incorrect bill numbers), and some of the notices contained information that quickly became useless (i.e., some phone lines became so jammed that it soon became pointless to try to call those numbers). We were all doing our best to keep you updated on the latest twists and turns in this rapidly developing situation, and that, unfortunately, came at the cost of a little confusion and a lot of full inboxes. Now that the confusion has cleared, I want to update you on exactly where we stand.

    As you probably know by now, Texas Senate Bill 1164, better known as the “guns on campus,” “campus carry,” or “concealed carry on campus” bill, was passed by the Texas Senate Wednesday afternoon. The bill now has until 11:59 PM Saturday to be scheduled for a floor vote in the Texas House and until 11:59 PM Tuesday to receive a preliminary vote in the Texas House.

    Just prior to adjournment yesterday (Thursday, May 21, 2009), the bill received its first reading (a formality) in the Texas House of Representatives and was assigned to the House Committee on Public Safety. According to Rule 4, Section 11(a) of the “Rules and Precedents of the Texas House,” the Public Safety Committee is not required to hold a public hearing on SB 1164 because they already held a public hearing on House Bill 1893, which was “substantially the same” as SB 1164. That means that the Public Safety Committee could vote on SB 1164 in an informal meeting as early as this morning (Friday, May 22). The Public Safety Committee can report favorably or unfavorably on the bill, but because they previously voted favorably on HB 1893, they’re expected to vote favorably on SB 1164 (more on this below).

    If the Public Safety Committee reports favorably on the bill, that report will go to the House Committee on Calendars. It’s then up to the Calendars Committee to schedule the bill for a vote by the full House of Representatives. This is the most crucial step of the process. As previously stated, the deadline to schedule bills for a floor vote by the full Houses is 11:59 PM this coming Saturday. If the Calendars Committee doesn’t schedule SB 1164 for a vote before that deadline, the bill dies. And that’s not the only way the Calendars Committee could kill the bill. They could also place SB 1164 so far down the House calendar that there is no possible way the House will reach it by 11:59 PM this coming Tuesday, which is the deadline for bills to receive the first of two required votes in the House.

    The only way to be certain that the House will reach SB 1164 before the Tuesday deadline is for the Calendars Committee to place SB 1164 on the House MAJOR calendar, rather than the House general calendar. Bills on the major calendar are always voted on first. This means that we need to vigorously and persistently push the members of the Texas House Committee on Calendars to place Senate Bill 1164 on the House MAJOR calendar AS SOON AS IT GETS TO THEM.

    For the reasons mentioned above, the members of the Calendars Committee should be the first legislators you contact (starting with Committee Chair Brian McCall of Plano).

    THE TEXAS HOUSE COMMITTEE ON CALENDARS (firmly but politely push these members to place Senate Bill 1164 on the House MAJOR calendar AS SOON AS IT GETS TO THEM):

    Texas House of Representatives (click on a Representative’s name or photo to view his or her contact info).

    After contacting the members of the Calendars Committee, you should call the three members of the Public Safety Committee who have indicated that they’re not entirely sure how they’ll vote on SB 1164. The fact that the Public Safety Committee passed HB 1893 is no guarantee that it will pass SB 1164. The vote on HB 1893 was close, and our opponents are focusing on these members of the Public Safety Committee, in an effort to kill the bill before it ever reaches the Calendars Committee.

    MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SAFETY WHOM YOU SHOULD CONTACT:

    Rep. Tryon D. Lewis - Texas House of Representatives: Member Tryon D. Lewis

    Rep. Phil King - Texas House of Representatives: Member Phil King

    Rep. Hubert Vo - Texas House of Representatives: Member Hubert Vo

    Finally, if none of the Representatives mentioned above represent your district, you should also contact YOUR State Representative:

    Congress.org - Elected Officials

    When you contact your State Representative, be sure to mention that you live in his or her district. When it comes to controversial bills like this, legislators hear from voters from all over the state, so you want to make sure and let your Representative know that you’re actually one of his or her constituents. The opinions of constituents always carry a lot more weight with legislators.

    Also, when talking to any legislator about this issue, be sure and mention if you happen to be a college student, a college professor, a college employee, or a parent of a college student (or soon-to-be college student). The opinions of people personally affected by bills typically carry a little more weight with legislators.

    The links above contain the phone and fax numbers for both the Representative’s Capitol offices and their district offices. Unless you live in a Representative’s district, you should try contacting his or her Capitol office first. The links also contain forms for emailing the legislators. Emails to legislators are often dismissed as less significant than phone calls and faxes or not read at all, so email should only be used if you can’t reach a Representative’s office by phone or fax or if you want to supplement your call or fax to the Representative.

    Thanks again for all you’re support and hard work. We’re almost to the finish line, so don’t let up now!

    Sincerely,

    W. Scott Lewis

    Former National Media Coordinator for Students for Concealed Carry on Campus (SCCC)

    PS. As always, anyone who is unfamiliar with or unsure about this issue can review the "Students for Concealed Carry on Campus Handbook: Texas Edition" here:

    studentsforconcealedcarryoncampus.com (PDF version)

    SCCC Handbook: Texas Edition - Non-fiction, Books, and Statistics (Flash version)
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  5. #35
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    Voted!

    Guns on college campuses
    Do you support proposed legislation that allows guns to be carried on college campuses across Texas? Read story
    Total Votes = 1800
    Yes, given the recent violence at schools this legislation makes sense
    9.166 %
    Yes, students, teachers, visitors should be able to defend themselves
    41.11 %
    No, this is insane legislation
    28.11 %
    No, it will only lead to more violence
    21.61 %
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  6. #36
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    We need all Texans here to hammer our Legislators for the next few hours/days and let the guys and gals from the other 49 states do the "easy" work of hitting the polls.

    It's crunch time, do or die for this legislation in Texas right now. Many of us are making the "target specific" phone calls and sending the faxes just now, not just hitting the internet polls. Please do the same. Some more specific info. as just posted by another member at TexasCHLforum.com

    Re: TWO URGENT ACTION ITEMS: Parking lots & Campus-Carry
    by CWOOD » Fri May 22, 2009

    In calling/faxing/visiting members of Calendars Committee regarding SB730 (parking lot storage) and SB1164 (campus carry) please keep in mind some of the members of this committee authored/coauthored the house companion bills .

    SB730
    Companion HB1301 was authored/coauthored by the following members of Calendars Committee:
    Vice-Chair: Lucio III
    Members:Cook
    Kuempel (still in hospital from heart attack)
    McReynolds

    SB1164

    THIS BILL IS STILL IN HOUSE PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE. FOR A LIST OF MEMBERS OF THIS COMMITTEE CLICK HERE:

    http://www.legis.state.tx.us/Committees ... eCode=C420

    Chair Merritt (supported HB1893)
    Vice-chair: Frost (supported HB1893)
    Members: Burnham
    Driver (wrote HB1893)
    King,Phil (supported HB1893)
    Lewis
    Caraway
    Rodriguez,Eddie (my rep and very anti)
    Vo

    If it gets out of Public Safety Committee, then it will go to Calendars Committee.

    Companion HB1893 was authored/coauthored by the following members of Calendars Committee:
    Vice-Chair: Lucio III
    Members: Cook
    Geren
    Keffer
    Kolkhorst
    Kuempel (in hospital)
    McReynolds

    Please acknowledge their support when asking for action on getting these two bills to MAJOR calendar.

    CWOOD
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  7. #37
    Member Array Greybeard's Avatar
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    It appear the Parking Lot Bill has been scheduled for the numero item on Saturday's "secondary" Calendar - but NOT on the MAJOR Calendar. If and when the Dems quit trying to delay things over an unrelated I.D. bill ...

    Regarding the Campus Carry Bill, this was in my "Inbox" minutes ago:

    Dear Supporters:

    I'm aware that the subject of my last email said, “Final Update,” so I hope you’ll excuse this brief postscript to that final update.

    The Texas House of Representatives typically works through about four or five pages of their overall calendar each day. There are currently three and a half legislative days left until the deadline for Senate bills to receive their first vote in the House. The House currently has 30 pages of unresolved calendar to get through.

    Do the math—there is no way that SB 1164 will receive a House vote prior to the deadline (11:59 PM Tuesday, May 26) UNLESS the Calendars Committee places it on the House MAJOR calendar, which would put it on approximately page three of the overall House calendar.

    When you call and fax the members of the House Calendars Committee, politely but adamantly push them to place Senate Bill 1164 on the House MAJOR calendar. Also, as soon as you get a chance, please contact the office of House Speaker Joe Straus (V: 512-463-0686 / F: 512-463-0675), and ask him to ask the Calendars Committee to place SB 1164 on the House MAJOR calendar.

    Sincerely,

    W. Scott Lewis

    Former National Media Coordinator for Students for Concealed Carry on Campus (SCCC)
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  8. #38
    Ex Member Array Oldskoolfan's Avatar
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    How would they enforce it? I mean will they do like Utah and make it so that state schools cannot expel you for possession of a firearm on campus?

  9. #39
    Ex Member Array Oldskoolfan's Avatar
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    And does this apply to private schools?

  10. #40
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    Private schools would have possibility to "opt out". But ... things ain't looking real rosy at the present.

    On a 5-2 vote, the House Public Safety Committee just approved the Campus Protection Act from the Senate, but the following does not help us at all on the Campus Carry or Parking Lot bill deadlines.

    Democrats use 'chubbing' stalling strategy

    By KELLEY SHANNON Associated Press Writer © 2009 The Associated Press

    May 22, 2009, 1:11PM

    AUSTIN, Texas — Talkative House Democrats used stalling tactics Friday to prevent passage of a voter identification bill they oppose that's scheduled for debate this weekend.

    Democrats — who'd warned they would put up a fight to stop the voter ID measure — began talking at length on non-controversial legislation to use up the clock. The Legislature adjourns June 1, and a number of bill passage deadlines are arriving in the next few days.

    The Senate already passed a Republican-pushed bill requiring voters to show a photo ID or two non-photo ID alternatives when they cast a ballot. Democrats say that would prevent people without those forms of identification from voting and suppress turnout. If Democrats are going to stop the legislation, it will have to be in the House, where the chamber is almost evenly divided by party.

    Veteran Rep. Delwin Jones, R-Lubbock, said Democratic opponents of the voter ID bill were trying to pressure fellow lawmakers to negotiate the legislation, in turn threatening scores of unrelated bills. The delay tactic, using the rules to eat up time, is known as "chubbing."

    "In lieu of the filibuster, the House chubs," Jones said. "It keeps a lot of bills from being considered, which puts a lot of pressure on the members who have bills they want to pass."

    The House gaveled into session 30 minutes late Friday. Then, after the usual prayer, pledge and welcoming remarks, legislators started in on a long "local and consent" agenda. It's supposed to be a non-controversial agenda of bills that usually breezes along.

    But Democrats made it clear they planned to ask lots of questions on those bills and use up all the time permitted — 10 minutes per bill — to slow down the House's work pace.

    One Democratic lawmaker during his questioning about a proposed municipal utility district in Waller County brought up a House leadership scandal from the 1970s. Another, questioning a Republican doctor representatives on his legislation, asked about the best remedies for nasal congestion.

    Rep. Sid Miller, R-Stephenville, raised a technical point to try to prevent the whole local and consent agenda from being considered so that the House could return to major pending bills, like changes to the top 10 percent college admissions law and, potentially, voter ID, slated for Saturday. He later temporarily withdrew that technical challenge.

    "Hopefully we can get back to the people's business and see less chubbing," Miller pleaded, to no avail.

    Republicans huddled to talk strategy at the back of the House chamber and in an adjoining conference room, where former Speaker Tom Craddick joined them. The Republicans told news reporters to leave the room.

    Rep. Mike "Tuffy" Hamilton, R-Mauriceville, said Republicans were taking a wait-and-see approach, for now.

    Speaker Pro Tempore Craig Eiland, a Galveston Democrat, presided over the House early Friday instead of Republican Speaker Joe Straus, as is usually done for a local bill agenda. Eiland reminded lawmakers they had a full three minutes to explain their bills if they wanted to take all the available time.

    At one point during the morning stalling, Democratic Rep. Mike Villarreal of San Antonio asked Eiland with a smile: "Mr. Speaker, are we going to break for lunch?"

    Lawmakers were told there would be no formal lunch break; there was complimentary shrimp waiting for them in the recently remodeled legislators' lounge.

    ___

    Associated Press writers Jay Root and Jackie Stone contributed to this report.
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  11. #41
    Ex Member Array Oldskoolfan's Avatar
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    Well I can support it as long as private universities have the right to opt out.

  12. #42
    Senior Member Array tbrenke's Avatar
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    Yes, given the recent violence at schools this legislation makes sense
    9.287 %
    Yes, students, teachers, visitors should be able to defend themselves
    42.33 %
    No, this is insane legislation
    27.37 %
    No, it will only lead to more violence
    21.00 %
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  13. #43
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    Is this going to just make CCing on campus not illegal, or does it say that you have a right to CC on campus and can't get expelled?

    A lot of states don't criminalize it, but I think outside of UT there's only a few that specifically allow it.

    The problem is these universities are run(typically) by antis, who alert the authorities anytime they hear any pro-gun speech.
    "The right of the whole people, old and young, men, women and boys, and not militia only, to keep and bear arms of every description, not such merely as are used by the militia, shall not be infringed, curtailed, or broken in upon, in the smallest degree..."
    Nunn v. State GA 1848

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by press1280 View Post
    Is this going to just make CCing on campus not illegal, or does it say that you have a right to CC on campus and can't get expelled?

    A lot of states don't criminalize it, but I think outside of UT there's only a few that specifically allow it.

    The problem is these universities are run(typically) by antis, who alert the authorities anytime they hear any pro-gun speech.
    I do believe that in Texas it is illegal to CCW on campus. This would legalize it for people.

    My question is the same as the second part of your question. If it is legal but they throw you out if caught, it seems to be rather pointless for the students. However it will be useful to those who are not students, faculty, or other employees but the people who spend the most time on the campus will not benefit from it since they would be either expelled or fired. So let us hope that Texas makes it clear that no consequences shall be faced by lawful CCWers for having a firearm on campus.

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