Employment discrimination against gun owners?

This is a discussion on Employment discrimination against gun owners? within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Odds are you signed something when you were hired giving them permission to search your stuff - I know I did when I was hired. ...

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 74
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Employment discrimination against gun owners?

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,540
    Odds are you signed something when you were hired giving them permission to search your stuff - I know I did when I was hired. Thus the purse-search may not be that far out. However, you did NOT give them permission to remove anything, so their taking the gun might be the key point in this part. As an aside: +1 on finding a better way to carry!

    The big deal, so far as I'm concerned, is the passing of information to the second company. I am one of the folks who does employment verifications for our company, and we're permitted to give hiredate, termdate, and job title. We cannot say why he left us - even whether it was his choice or ours. It would seem that this reticence is probably company-lawyer-driven, suggesting they're trying to avoid liability... which suggests that YOUR previous comany stepped into a liability zone that our company wants to avoid.

    Certainly you should meet with a lawyer for their intake screening at least, to see if you have a case. Wish you the best...
    Recently updated website: http://www.damagedphotorepair.com

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #32
    Member Array grandma4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    459
    Man oh Man you have got to call the NRA as well as the Civil Liberties Union, and the Best Civil Rights Attorney there is. File a suit against them TODAY



    And welcome to the forum and to a Woman who can defend herself. We women can be proud that we can stand up and be counted in the fight for our rights as American Citizens.

  4. #33
    Member Array KSCarry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    412
    Without a doubt lawyer up. Consultations are typically free, and you can get a decent idea about the worthiness of your case. If you do go forward, I wish you the best of luck. If all is as you've stated on your original post, then it sounds like you have a solid case. Be prepared though...one or both companies will do their best to drag your name through the dirt before they pay you one cent. You'll get questioned over everything you ever did at work...you may win in the end, but it will cost you too.

    Again, best of luck. I hate to see anyone take advantage of another, and the info you posted certainly indicates that there was malicious intent on the part of your employers.

  5. #34
    Member Array ncglock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    319
    Hopyard is 100% ... Termination is never pretty but almost always leads to something better

  6. #35
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    2,736
    I was reading the first posts and all I read was that the OP should sue...rights trampled...retirement... millionare!!!

    Finally, some sane posts brought the situation to reality. Many employers reserve the right to search employees as a matter of policy (and sometimes law.) Allowing access to a firearm is never a good idea in every case. And companies providing information to future employers is standard fare.

    I think it is always wise to consult a lawyer. The story presented here might not represent the pertinent facts of the issue. And at very least it might be protection against potential prosecutions. It will be money well spent.

    I would recommend carrying the gun on your person where you have complete control, finding a job that does not disallow carry, and not telling anyone that you carry. A lawsuit against a former employer will probably result in a huge waste of time and a great expense to you.

  7. #36
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,629
    Quote Originally Posted by edr9x23super View Post
    Simple:

    LAWSUIT, LAWSUIT LAWSUIT.......

    i can unequivocally tell you that your former employer had zero business going through your purse, and for darn sure had ABSOLUTELY no business telling your current employer that you might "have a gun".

    Believe me when I tell you that every company I have ever worked for was under very strict guidelines as to what to reveal to other employers regarding their former employees. The company I work for will not even allow people listed on references to speak to businesses inquiring about employees for legal reasons. The only information my company's HR department releases to anyone are dates of employment and a basic job description.

    Please don't let them get away with this, contact an attorney and the NRA immediately.....
    + 1000 ... absolutely correct.... lawyer up !!!

  8. #37
    Member Array yzcrasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    349

    To the OP

    We might not know the whole story but this to me sounds like a company policy thing. My company has in the policy book total right to search and take anything on company property. Black and white. Also with right to work states there doesn't need to be a reason to be fired. My employer can fire me because I look funny that day if they want to..........tricky indeed.
    I say chat with a lawyer just in case but don't get your hopes up, and consider it a good life lesson..
    GOOD LUCK whatever you decide to do though, and welcome to the forum.
    ((Place funny, whitty comment here))

  9. #38
    Member Array grandma4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    459
    I have NEVER signed anything that gave my rights away for being searched. As Dolly said very correctly once "Take this job and shove it!"

  10. #39
    VIP Member Array matiki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    N.W.
    Posts
    2,918
    I am not a lawyer, but the only issue I see (although it's a huge issue) is the first employer contacting the second. I will add to the chorus that is recommending consulting an attorney. I've never worked for a company that permitted disclosure of more than: a) confirmation of employment, b) hire and termination date, c) wage at hire and termination, d) rehirable or not. We had an employee settle about two years ago because we said something along the lines of "we would never rehire a thief" (he was termed for theft). He made out like a bandit both during and after employment as a result.
    "Wise people learn when they can; fools learn when they must." - The Duke of Wellington

  11. #40
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Shelby County TN
    Posts
    11,108
    I would definitely call a lawyer and seriously consider a lawsuit against the first company for divulging the info about you to the second company and against the second company for terminating you because of it.
    ,=====o00o _
    //___l__,\____\,__
    l_--- \___l---[]lllllll[]
    (o)_)-o- (o)_)--o-)_)

  12. #41
    Member Array Sheree's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    25
    If a good lawyer says you have a case--go for it 100%. It would be good for that bunch to be reined in some. You have certainly learned a painful lesson on why keeping your gun on your person may be uncomfortable for the body, but better than wondering if someone can get it out of your purse. Not everyone thinks a woman's purse is sacred....that reminds me of how even my father would sooner pick up a rattlesnake than touch my mom's purse :)

  13. #42
    Member Array OMEGA2669's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lakewood, Colorado
    Posts
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunny View Post
    +1 on lawyer and lawsuit. They went into YOUR PRIVATE PROPERTY w.o permission and unknown to you? they TOOK YOUR PROPERTY and the TERMINATED you despite no wrongdoing? I'm no lawyer, but I'd like to think you can retire early after this goes to court. :(
    +1 Bunny
    AT3 (O-Level) United States Navy - NRA Life Member
    "Molan labe! Just try... I'll show you the strength of my conviction... and I'll sleep well that night..."

  14. #43
    Member Array Torrid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by matiki View Post
    I am not a lawyer, but the only issue I see (although it's a huge issue) is the first employer contacting the second. I will add to the chorus that is recommending consulting an attorney. I've never worked for a company that permitted disclosure of more than: a) confirmation of employment, b) hire and termination date, c) wage at hire and termination, d) rehirable or not. We had an employee settle about two years ago because we said something along the lines of "we would never rehire a thief" (he was termed for theft). He made out like a bandit both during and after employment as a result.
    Exactly. Same thing with my company. In this day and age, it's a cover your ass situation.

  15. #44
    Member Array UW Dawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    87
    These posters are giving you very good advice and I hope that you take it. What they did to you is just plain wrong.

    Even if you don't really have a desire to file a lawsuit for your own personal benefit, please do it anyway. Do it to ensure that these companies never again do this to anyone else.

  16. #45
    Member Array wolfshead's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Renton WA
    Posts
    493
    I don't think they can go through a person's personal items without a search warrant or an LEO present. I doubt company security has the right unless specifically posted "No weapons permitted beyond this point - Subject to search". Also, there was no incident where this person indicated or displayed any disturbing or threatening behaviour so I feel its unfair for them to inform the new company and create a fear psychosis.
    Vince K
    Aerospace Designer, Freemason, NRA member

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Employment requirement for CC license?
    By cyberdogg in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: June 12th, 2009, 11:45 PM
  2. Employment Opportunity
    By Patti in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 8th, 2009, 03:27 PM
  3. South Carolina Employment Rules
    By Mountainman1 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: December 15th, 2008, 01:59 PM
  4. CCW Discrimination - Investigative Report
    By ibez in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: January 11th, 2008, 09:45 PM
  5. Do you believe this? (Illegal Immigration/Employment topic)
    By amlevin in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: June 28th, 2006, 10:42 PM

Search tags for this page

bigotry against gun owners
,
can the nra help me with a disrimination issu at work
,
can you be discriminated against for being a gun owner?
,
discriminate 237.106
,

discrimination against gun owners

,
employer discrimination against gun owners
,
employer+discrimination+of+gun owners
,
employment discrimination gun status
,
employment discrimination sgainst gun
,

gun owner discrimination

,
job discrimination based on concealed carry status laws
,
prejudice against gun owners
Click on a term to search for related topics.