Quote Originally Posted by Cytoviper View Post
Ok if this true, does this mean OC or does it apply to CC also?

So I assume its ok to fly in with it in checked luggage and then carry once outside of the airport property?

Its a timely thread as I am planning to visit later this month.
Yes. You may bring your firearm, properly checked in your luggage, and once you are out of the airport you may carry it. It is against the law to carry concealed (it is unclear if this applies to OC but I would not do it) in any building on the property of the airport.

Nevada law (IANAL):
Nevada is a defacto open carry state and you may open carry if you choose. If you open carry in the high traffic tourist areas of Las Vegas you may have a visit from Metro or, Casino personnel may/will ask you to leave the property if you open carry in any casino. If anyone in authority in any private establishment asks you to leave you must leave under Nevada's trespass law.

There is no restriction on having a firearm in your car, open or concealed as long as it is not concealed on your person (unless you have a permit).

There is statewide preemption, but the Attorney General, on her web-site indicades that she may not think it applies in all cases.

NVAG

If you have a permit that is valid in Nevada:

Recognition of permits issued by other states:

Out of State Carry Concealed Weapon Permit Recognition

Effective Oct 1, 2007

In accordance with Senate Bill 237 passed by the 2007 Nevada Legislature the State of Nevada will recognize the following States' CCW permit holders:

Alaska, Arkansas, Florida (added January 3, 2008), Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan (added May 9, 2008), Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee and Utah

This law allows holders of valid permits from these states to carry a concealed weapon while in the State of Nevada. The permit must be in the possession of the issuee at all times while carrying a firearm.

Nevada Department of Public Safety - Records and Technology

NRS: CHAPTER 202 - CRIMES AGAINST PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY

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You may carry concealed in Nevada ANYWHERE except:

Buildings at the airport,
Schools (including colleges) and child care facilitys,
Public buildings (that means Government buildings) that are posted or have metal detectors.

NRS: CHAPTER 202 - CRIMES AGAINST PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY

That includes casinos, bars, clubs, restaurants, whorehouses (they are legal in parts of Nevada), ANYWHERE. They may ask you to leave for any reason, or no reason at all, and, under Nevada's trespass law, you must leave.

You may drink while carrying. The BAC limit is 0.10 (DUI is 0.08, when they lowered it to get federal highway money they did not change the limit for CCW).

NRS: CHAPTER 202 - CRIMES AGAINST PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY

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I hope this clears up any questions. Nevada laws concerning weapons are, for the most part at NRS 202.253 through 202.369.

Have fun in Nevada. Bring lots of money.

Ken


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Crimes Against the Person NRS: CHAPTER 200 - CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON

NRS 200.120 “Justifiable homicide” defined. Justifiable homicide is the killing of a human being in necessary self-defense, or in defense of habitation, property or person, against one who manifestly intends, or endeavors, by violence or surprise, to commit a felony, or against any person or persons who manifestly intend and endeavor, in a violent, riotous, tumultuous or surreptitious manner, to enter the habitation of another for the purpose of assaulting or offering personal violence to any person dwelling or being therein.

[1911 C&P § 129; RL § 6394; NCL § 10076]—(NRS A 1983, 518)

NRS: CHAPTER 200 - CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON

NRS 200.130 Bare fear insufficient to justify killing; reasonable fear required. A bare fear of any of the offenses mentioned in NRS 200.120, to prevent which the homicide is alleged to have been committed, shall not be sufficient to justify the killing. It must appear that the circumstances were sufficient to excite the fears of a reasonable person, and that the party killing really acted under the influence of those fears and not in a spirit of revenge.

[1911 C&P § 130; RL § 6395; NCL § 10077]

NRS: CHAPTER 200 - CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON

NRS 200.200 Killing in self-defense. If a person kills another in self-defense, it must appear that:

1. The danger was so urgent and pressing that, in order to save his own life, or to prevent his receiving great bodily harm, the killing of the other was absolutely necessary; and

2. The person killed was the assailant, or that the slayer had really, and in good faith, endeavored to decline any further struggle before the mortal blow was given.

[1911 C&P § 137; RL § 6402; NCL § 10084]

NRS: CHAPTER 200 - CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON

BODILY INJURY

NRS 200.275 Justifiable infliction or threat of bodily injury not punishable.

etc.

Ken