Shooting discomfort

This is a discussion on Shooting discomfort within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Well, I'm looking for another daily carry piece and one of the reasons is that the Taurus Mil Pro I carry now has a very ...

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Thread: Shooting discomfort

  1. #16
    Member Array exposurecontrol's Avatar
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    Well, I'm looking for another daily carry piece and one of the reasons is that the Taurus Mil Pro I carry now has a very hard trigger pull. Went to the range the other day, put 100 rounds through it and my trigger finger was tired and sore when I finished. Dependable gun, but hard on us weak fingered types.
    God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the weaponry to make the difference.

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  3. #17
    Member Array duckhunter's Avatar
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    I shoot more often with gloves than without. Everytime I qualify or train with the M4 or M9, I wear green nomex flight gloves, and I've worn out numerous sets while deployed. Nice and thin and allow a good feel of the controls and trigger.

    While plinking, especially with lever actions and SA revolvers, I wear very thin deer skin gloves. For waterfowl and deer hunting I am almost wearing some type of glove, because it can get COLD out there!

    I guess I've never had any issues with gloves, other than once or twice getting the thumb jammed inside the shotgun mag while reloading during a smoking goose hunt. Now I just cut the tip of the right thumb off and hold it in my teeth while I reload.
    "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final." - Bill Jordan

  4. #18
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    Know what ya mean about getting the glove jammed in the mag. on a shotgun.
    I have never been bitten by a bad area on any of my guns, but the .44 does recoil back pretty hard.
    My friend cut his thumb real nasty with my PT 140. i think he let it ride a little high on the frame and bled for it.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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  5. #19
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    I just cut the tip of the right thumb off and hold it in my teeth while I reload.
    Duck - guess that proves that you are indeed a meat eater (or chewer)
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  6. #20
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    Now I just cut the tip of the right thumb off and hold it in my teeth while I reload.
    Wow! That's one tough thumb ya got there! That's why I quit goose hunting - its only great hunting when it's too cold, too wet - too miserable. I be a wimp.

    Actually, in TX we're lucky - pretty mild weather, so gloves not needed too often. They can help on the range though.

  7. #21
    VIP Member Array PatrioticRick's Avatar
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    I really don't like gloves, so I got Hogue grips and that suits me fine.
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  8. #22
    VIP Member Array maclean3's Avatar
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    I keep a neoprene wrist brace in the range bag, helps avoid the soreness and fatigue I use to get after shooting a couple hundred rounds with the .45 or .44mag (usually with Specials) - makes .38spl in the 642 somewhat of a cream puff. I also keep a first aid kit in the truck, I'm accident prone to begin with and it's nice to be able to clean and bandage hammer bite, cuts from the slide, etc. when I'm done at the range.

    I burned up my last set of deerskin gloves playing knifemaker last Spring. Keep meaning to buy another pair but every time I walk into Home Depot I get sidetracked ... something about the smell of lumber and power tools.
    Jack

  9. #23
    Member Array duckhunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry
    Duck - guess that proves that you are indeed a meat eater (or chewer)

    OK, I could have worded that a little better.

    I hold the thumb part of the GLOVE in my teeth... Although, some mornings the fingers get so frozen I probably could bite my thumb and not notice!
    "Speed is fine, but accuracy is final." - Bill Jordan

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array rachilders's Avatar
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    It would seem I hit a nerve with so many replies in so short a period of time!

    To qualify my original post just a bit... first, my "shooting" gloves are a pair of semi-fingerless, leather exercise type gloves I bought over 20 years ago. Their original use was as summer riding gloves with my motorcycles. They only go as far as the first joint past the knuckle and act more as a cushion for my palm and the web of my hand than anything else.

    Next, I usually use gloves when know I will be shooting a hundred or more rounds during a session and normally only with guns of a larger (.40 and above) caliber. Most of my 9's, 380's and smaller caliber guns don't produce enough recoil or bite for me to consider a glove necessary, though I will use a glove on occasion if I'm firing several guns of different calibers. It's just easier than taking them on and off every time I change guns. FWIW, I also prefer using the glove when I shoot my shotguns, so it's not just a pistol thing and I do wear gloves in the winter, so there is something of a practical side to using them for practice sessions.

    As I mentioned earlier, the glove is used mainly as a comfort item for extended use at the range, like shooting glasses and ear plugs. In a real life and death situation, I won't have in plugs and probably won't be wearing glasses, but I still use them when I practice. If I find that a certain gun becomes uncomfortable to shoot after only a dozen rounds or less, there is a problem with either me or the gun that needs to be resolved. However, firing several hundred rounds or more in a short period of time is a different thing altogether. Finally, no matter how well a gun fits your hand or how experienced you are firing it, at some point most guns of a certain size and caliber will cause discomfort if you shoot enough bullets through it at one time.

    The bottom line for me is when I use a glove, it's as an aide to help me shoot longer and with less discomfort. The more I shoot a gun, the more comfortable I feel in my ability to use it under more varied circumstances. Using a glove helps me practice more and allows me to concentrate on my shooting skills rather than being distracted by continuous heavy recoil or the odd bite I may get from a slide or hammer.

    I guess it all really comes down to personal preference and what you, individually, feel comfortable doing.
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  11. #25
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    When I shoot my 1911's I never have a problem. I never wear gloves. As Betty said, just not tactile enough for me.

    I've shot hundreds of rounds in a day with no bite, aches or pains anywhere. That includes 2000 rounds in 6 days at Thunder Ranch.

    My gun is a pleasure to shoot and I can do it just as long as there is ammo to fill the next mag.
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  12. #26
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Ya know ive never shot with gloves on shooting a 1911 but as i said before all extended range sessions i usually do course most of them are with a wheelie

    I also agree that while i wont be using gloves for a real life shooting neither will i be using ear plugs nor Safety glasses i see no problem in using glooves for range session as long as you do shoot your carry gun bare handed

    Ive shot as many as 100 500 smith rounds bare handed and 454 upwards of 150 let me tell ya Shooting gloves help at the end of the day

  13. #27
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    When I go to the range, I always take at least two and sometimes three of my guns. The .40 Springfield XD is my favorite and I always run at least 100 rounds through it. My .45 Para Warthog is a close second and also do at least 100. The 9mm's I'll sometimes only run 50 rounds through. The only gun that ever caused me any discomfort was a 9mm Beretta. Got bit cleaning it. Never did like the large opening in the slide over the barrel. Got rid of it and got a 9mm Springfield instead, which is just fine. If it isn't comfortable in my hand (shooting, holding, or cleaning) I don't want it.

    Now loading all those bullets can be a pain, but I got a loader for that!

  14. #28
    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSKC
    I'm with Betty. If a gun isn't comfortable, I'm not interested.

    I test-drove a very light weight .38 a while back that stung my hand with every shot. When I mentioned that to the man behind the counter, he said "That's a gun you carry a lot and shoot a little." Sorry, but I don't buy that. If putting enough rounds down range to be confident with the gun causes my hand to hurt or I start flinching, I'm never going to feel confident with the gun.SSKC
    I agree with that. I'm a big believer in the grind-n-buff. If you experience little knicks or gouges during a range session, when things are optimal, how will they go if your (hastily assumed)high-grip results in the slide plowing two not-so-neat furrows through the web of your hand, washing your grip in blood, in extremis? Light pain is a warning- something needs correcting before something major goes wrong.

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array Tom357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob72
    I agree with that. I'm a big believer in the grind-n-buff. If you experience little knicks or gouges during a range session, when things are optimal, how will they go if your (hastily assumed)high-grip results in the slide plowing two not-so-neat furrows through the web of your hand, washing your grip in blood, in extremis? Light pain is a warning- something needs correcting before something major goes wrong.
    Last year, when I joined, here, I was recovering from shredding my right hand. Nerves in the palm of my hand were right at the surface, in the new skin, and when I went shooting every shot was pins and needles. You folks suggested shooting gloves, which I tried, but I didn't feel connected to my pistol. I got a set of soft Hogue grips, and for me, that worked much better.

    I once took a P232 for a test shoot. Just the way my hands are, it wasn't a good fit. The web of my hand still has scars from the tracks the slide cut. If I had been wearing gloves, I wouldn't have been aware (or as aware) of the fit issue, and might have wasted my money and time on an ill-fitting pistol.

    RA has some good points about making long practice sessions more comfortable. I know it starts to get uncomfortable for me as I approach 200 shots. I guess I've just considered that part of training, though. As with so many other aspects of shooting, I guess it's just whatever works.
    - Tom
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  16. #30
    Member Array Shekkian's Avatar
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    My thoughts are, practicing with gloves would be very useful if you decide to get into competitive shooting.

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