Bank calls my place of employment for asking a gun question - Page 5

Bank calls my place of employment for asking a gun question

This is a discussion on Bank calls my place of employment for asking a gun question within the Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Just my opinion but, I too think I would check with the NRA recommended lawyer for your area to see what action, if any, you ...

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 119

Thread: Bank calls my place of employment for asking a gun question

  1. #61
    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Shelby County TN
    Posts
    11,134
    Just my opinion but, I too think I would check with the NRA recommended lawyer for your area to see what action, if any, you might be able to take against the bank.

    Like I said though, that's just what I would do.
    ,=====o00o _
    //___l__,\____\,__
    l_--- \___l---[]lllllll[]
    (o)_)-o- (o)_)--o-)_)


  2. #62
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    2,736
    Quote Originally Posted by Random View Post
    I've seen a few people say this, but:



    There are a lot of comments about how the bank violated HIS privacy and HIS customer rights. That is not the case. THE BANK CONTACTED THEIR BUSINESS CUSTOMER ABOUT THE ACTIONS OF ONE OF THAT CUSTOMER'S EMPLOYEES WHILE ON THEIR PREMISES.

    IANAL, but I don't see any recourse at all, even if he is terminated directly as a result.
    This is an excellent post. You succinctly stated a conclusion that is directly on point. It is a view that everyone missed.

  3. #63
    Sponsor
    Array NelsonHolsters's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lenior NC
    Posts
    617
    Quote Originally Posted by cwblanco View Post
    I am a lawyer. I have read the question several times, and I still am uncertain about the facts given or what the specific question is. I am not in the least trying to be critical or judgmental, but perhaps if he could put in some punctuation and/or give us some more facts, we could give a better answer.

    I went to pick up my check today and my place of employment they
    ask me if I was carring a gun and if I had a permit.
    (Now the place I work at is a health care facility and are antigun) I told them now I wasnt carring at the present moment but yes I do have a permit and they proceded to tell me the bank had called them to say one of there employees had ask what there policy was on open carry in the bank which was me.
    They told me and I listened, no problem.
    Now I provide care for my wife who is disabled and being disabled she gets a disablity check (well I guess you could call it that) but anyway
    she is automactily on medicaid and they pay this company to pay me
    and as I said they are anti gun.
    So what right did the bank have to do this ?
    Do I have any recourse against this bank for violating my privacy among other things ?
    And if I lose my job do I have any recourse ?
    And yes I do have a valid NC chp.

    Better ?? :)

  4. #64
    VIP Member Array Tom G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,375
    Find another bank that dose not stick their nose in your business. If you lose your job or are demoted then I would get a lawyer.Carry concealed and you will not have any problems unless you ask if you can carry.

  5. #65
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    12,056

    More interesting now

    Quote Originally Posted by Fdisk View Post
    They told me and I listened, no problem.
    Now I provide care for my wife who is disabled and being disabled she gets a disablity check (well I guess you could call it that) but anyway
    she is automactily on medicaid and they pay this company to pay me
    and as I said they are anti gun.

    Better ?? :)
    This is more interesting now. It isn't so clear to me that you are an employee of the hospital (or whatever health care facility it is) simply because they are passing along Medicaid money to you to take care of your wife instead of Medicaid having to hire someone else directly or contract with a company to hire someone.

    So, let's first establish whether or not you are truly an employee of this health care facility the bank phoned.

    Do they take income taxes out of the check to you for the services you provide?

    Do they withhold Medicare or Social Security taxes from the check they give you for taking care of your wife?

    Are they merely passing along money to your wife for her to pay someone to take care of her and that someone happens to be you?

    More interesting, suppose they fired you. What would they then do to keep their obligations to provide Medicaid living assistance to your wife? They can't cut her off just because you had some sort of incident at the bank or violated a rule at the facility where you perhaps are employed, perhaps not.

    This is a tad more complicated than it originally seemed.

    Are you absolutely certain you are considered an employee of that facility?

    Next step, suppose they decided to fire you. How would Medicaid take care of your wife?

    Without knowing if you are truly their employee and not merely a recipient of Medicaid payments, it isn't possible to speculate further about whether or not the bank did anything wrong.

    Is the check made payable in your name or in your wife's name?

  6. #66
    PM
    PM is offline
    Senior Member Array PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    670
    First, is NC a state where you work at the whim of your employer (like KS where you can be fired and you (the employee have to prove wrongful termination). If so, you are in a bad situation as I understand it.

    Also fellow forum folks it is his employers bank (if I understand him) that did this.

    As to why you would ask . . .

  7. #67
    VIP Member
    Array gunthorp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    home office
    Posts
    2,355
    Sorry to hear of the disability of your loved one, and your taking care of her is admirable. I'm glad you're able to have the financial help. It seems you have been forthright with your employer, and you asked an honest question of the bank employee. I hope the whole matter blows over without repercussions, if you don't stirr the pot. Document events clearly, in case you suffer future harm, and competent legal advice can be based on all the facts.

    As an afterthought, I never discuss my own permit status with anyone except a LEO who specifically asks, my immediate family, or my students. I ask students to call me with any questions, and if I'm unsure, I ask the Attorney General for a written response. The problem remains that written opinions and black letter laws turn all shades of grey in court. Obscure precidents have been know to muddy even the purest spring of justice. I doubt many of us would walk into an IRS office to ask if such and such would have increased our tax liability.

    Let us know what happens.
    Liberty, Property, or Death - Jonathan Gardner's powder horn inscription 1776

    Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
    ("Do not give in to evil but proceed ever more boldly against it.")
    -Virgil, Aeneid, vi, 95

  8. #68
    Sponsor
    Array NelsonHolsters's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lenior NC
    Posts
    617
    Quote Originally Posted by gunthorp View Post
    Sorry to hear of the disability of your loved one, and your taking care of her is admirable. I'm glad you're able to have the financial help. It seems you have been forthright with your employer, and you asked an honest question of the bank employee. I hope the whole matter blows over without repercussions, if you don't stirr the pot. Document events clearly, in case you suffer future harm, and competent legal advice can be based on all the facts.

    As an afterthought, I never discuss my own permit status with anyone except a LEO who specifically asks, my immediate family, or my students. I ask students to call me with any questions, and if I'm unsure, I ask the Attorney General for a written response. The problem remains that written opinions and black letter laws turn all shades of grey in court. Obscure precidents have been know to muddy even the purest spring of justice. I doubt many of us would walk into an IRS office to ask if such and such would have increased our tax liability.

    Let us know what happens.
    Normally i dont discuss my permit status but after the bank called my work and they ask me i told them.

    But hear is something interesting I called the NRA today
    they transferred my call and the lady I spoke with said in NC it is normally not allowed to open carry in a bank and it was better I ask before I did or more than Likely I would have had allot more trouble but she also said if the bank wasn't posted I probly wouldn't have been prosecuted.

    The NRA said dont try to open carry in a bank.

    So legal or not i got it from the NRA and your welcome to call there is an option for the call to be transferred for legal advise.

  9. #69
    New Member Array DrTodd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Tallmadge Township, MI
    Posts
    12

    Should the bank call?

    Not necessarily a "legal" answer, but rather an "ethical" one. This comes from the May 10 New York Times ethicist column:

    I am a bank teller. When I work the drive-through window, every week or two customers present a state ID instead of a driver’s license, often acknowledging that they have no license. As a teller, I must keep bank information confidential. As a citizen, I worry about the dangers of unlicensed drivers. May I report them to the police? NAME WITHHELD, WISCONSIN

    You may not. As you note, you have a privileged relationship with your customers. It is because they can rely on you to protect their privacy that they are willing to disclose all sorts of personal information. Your duty to safeguard customer privacy would be superseded if someone presented a serious imminent danger to others — if someone were driving blindfolded while firing a crossbow and steering with his feet, for instance. But being unlicensed does not in itself constitute a sufficient threat to warrant your calling the cops.

    You may register a protest — a phone call to the highway patrol, a query to some sort of columnist — if you do not disclose privileged information.

    It is impressive that unlicensed drivers regularly use the drive-through and cheerfully acknowledge law-breaking rather than simply park and do their banking indoors — a stirring example of either sheer bravado, stunning dimwittedness or a robust determination to avoid exercise, even by walking from the parking lot to the bank.

  10. #70
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    12,056

    State IDs--re Dr.Todd

    Quote Originally Posted by DrTodd View Post
    Not necessarily a "legal" answer, but rather an "ethical" one. This comes from the May 10 New York Times ethicist column:

    I am a bank teller. When I work the drive-through window, every week or two customers present a state ID instead of a driver’s license, often acknowledging that they have no license. As a teller, I must keep bank information confidential. As a citizen, I worry about the dangers of unlicensed drivers. May I report them to the police? NAME WITHHELD, WISCONSIN

    You may not. As you note, you have a privileged relationship with your customers. It is because they can rely on you to protect their privacy that they are willing to disclose all sorts of personal information. Your duty to safeguard customer privacy would be superseded if someone presented a serious imminent danger to others — if someone were driving blindfolded while firing a crossbow and steering with his feet, for instance. But being unlicensed does not in itself constitute a sufficient threat to warrant your calling the cops.

    You may register a protest — a phone call to the highway patrol, a query to some sort of columnist — if you do not disclose privileged information.

    It is impressive that unlicensed drivers regularly use the drive-through and cheerfully acknowledge law-breaking rather than simply park and do their banking indoors — a stirring example of either sheer bravado, stunning dimwittedness or a robust determination to avoid exercise, even by walking from the parking lot to the bank.
    While this is not anywhere near closely related to the o.p.'s question,
    the teller in the scenario you (Dr. Todd) posted has made numerous inappropriate conclusions about the offering of a state ID.

    I hold a perfectly good DL, CHL, and state issued ID. When I am asked for ID by anyone other than an officer for something related to driving, I show my state ID. That is because I don't want to risk losing either my DL or CHL.

    So, just because a customer drives up to a bank and perhaps sends a state issued ID through the pneumatic tubes at the drive up window to the teller, does not mean that they are driving illegally. It means they don't want to risk the dummy behind the glass losing their DL, sending it to the wrong driver by placing in the wrong pneumatic tube and so forth.

    I use state issued ID at the airport, and it is perfectly acceptable. I did one time get asked for a second ID and (though I don't typically do it) I gave my CHL. The bank employee wouldn't accept that but was perfectly happy to take a SAMS card or a AAA card. Go know.

    The "ethicist" responding in the NY Times article apparently didn't think through his/her answer carefully. Yes, it would be unethical to make a report to the police in that circumstance, as it was unethical to call the o.p.'s employer, but the teller in the story posted by Dr. Todd was completely mistaken about her conclusions. Had she phoned the police she likely would have just wasted their time, and hers, and her employers.

  11. #71
    Ex Member Array Oldskoolfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    In a secured zone.
    Posts
    464
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    While this is not anywhere near closely related to the o.p.'s question,
    the teller in the scenario you (Dr. Todd) posted has made numerous inappropriate conclusions about the offering of a state ID.

    I hold a perfectly good DL, CHL, and state issued ID. When I am asked for ID by anyone other than an officer for something related to driving, I show my state ID. That is because I don't want to risk losing either my DL or CHL.

    So, just because a customer drives up to a bank and perhaps sends a state issued ID through the pneumatic tubes at the drive up window to the teller, does not mean that they are driving illegally. It means they don't want to risk the dummy behind the glass losing their DL, sending it to the wrong driver by placing in the wrong pneumatic tube and so forth.

    I use state issued ID at the airport, and it is perfectly acceptable. I did one time get asked for a second ID and (though I don't typically do it) I gave my CHL. The bank employee wouldn't accept that but was perfectly happy to take a SAMS card or a AAA card. Go know.

    The "ethicist" responding in the NY Times article apparently didn't think through his/her answer carefully. Yes, it would be unethical to make a report to the police in that circumstance, as it was unethical to call the o.p.'s employer, but the teller in the story posted by Dr. Todd was completely mistaken about her conclusions. Had she phoned the police she likely would have just wasted their time, and hers, and her employers.
    This is the same conclusion I came to. Many people have state issued ID cards to use daily here in my town as it is a college town. I think it was wrong to assume that they are breaking the law simply because they did not use their drivers licenses.

  12. #72
    VIP Member
    Array Miggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Miami-Dade, FL
    Posts
    6,258
    Good morning ladies and gents. Your friendly neighborhood Mod has just spent way too much time cleaning this thread. Due to the fact that I am an evil-ill-tempered human without my required level of coffee, I was about to shut down this thread for good due to the unnecessary comments and attacks. Since I am now sipping on a hot cup of java, I am giving this thread a reprieve but it will be kept under a watchful eye.

    Keep it polite and on topic.
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

    Ego will kill you. Leave it at home.
    Signed: Me!

  13. #73
    Member Array mykeld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by retsupt99 View Post
    L-A-W-Y-E-R...
    Quote Originally Posted by chambered View Post
    some people are so bored with their own lives; they have to meddle in yours.
    that sucks I hope it works out well.
    Quote Originally Posted by puncho View Post
    You have rights, exercise them...
    Dude, I'm unhappy with NRA but if this happened to me, I'd call them.
    Good luck. Let us know what a lawyer says.
    Mykel

    more later...

  14. #74
    Member Array xd45in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    SW Indiana
    Posts
    19
    Why OC? I carry into my bank all the time(concealed) with no problems.
    The old Dont ask Dont tell ............
    I think OC can just cause problems from the Sheeple.I do understand that OC is Your Right,but why fuel the fire.......JMO
    When I leave my house in the morning........I take all of my Rights with me.

  15. #75
    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Western Colorado
    Posts
    4,554
    Quote Originally Posted by xd45in View Post
    Why OC? I carry into my bank all the time(concealed) with no problems.
    The old Dont ask Dont tell ............
    I think OC can just cause problems from the Sheeple.I do understand that OC is Your Right,but why fuel the fire.......JMO
    AMEN! There is nothing wrong with exercising your rights but there is also nothing wrong with choosing your battle ground. The bank wouldn't be my choice of places to prove the point. I have however been carrying concealed in my bank for years. No one knows of course.

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. What The...? Robber Calls Place He Just Robbed To Complain?
    By JoJoGunn in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: August 3rd, 2010, 09:07 AM
  2. Wife's work place question
    By TN_Mike in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: July 2nd, 2009, 07:58 PM
  3. FFL License question... hope this is the right place
    By tbmccord in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: May 9th, 2009, 07:11 PM
  4. South Carolina - Bank Carry Question
    By Sejune in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: April 25th, 2009, 07:34 PM
  5. Death Threat at my place of employment - RANT
    By DMan in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 29th, 2008, 03:21 PM

Search tags for this page

bank employee violated privacy
,
banks ask for place of employment
,
do i have to provide my bank with my place of employment
,
does the bank have the right to ask me about the details of my place of employment
,

lawsuit pneumatic tube drive through

,

work at a bank carry a gun

Click on a term to search for related topics.